What is Avascular Necrosis/Osteonecrosis 

Who Gets Avascular Necrosis and What Causes It?As many as 20,000 people develop AVN each year. Most are between ages 20 and 50. For healthy people, the risk of AVN is small. 

Most cases are the result of an underlying health problem or injury. Possible causes include:

Dislocation or fracture of the thigh bone (femur). This type of injury can affect the blood supply to the bone, leading to trauma-related avascular necrosis. AVN may develop in 20% or more of people who dislocate a hip.

Chronic corticosteroid use. Long-term use of these inflammation-fighting drugs, either orally or intravenously, is associated with 35% of all cases of nontraumatic AVN. 

Although the reason for this is not completely understood, doctors suspect these drugs may interfere with the body’s ability to break down fatty substances. 

These substances collect in the blood vessels making them narrower and reduce the amount of blood to the bone.

Excessive alcohol use. Much like corticosteroids, excessive alcohol may cause fatty substances to build in the blood vessels and decrease the blood supply to the bones.

Blood clots, inflammation, and damage to the arteries. All of these can block blood flow to the bones.


Other conditions associated with nontraumatic AVN include:

* Gaucher’s disease, an inherited metabolic disorder in which harmful quantities of a fatty substance accumulate in the organs

    * Sickle cell disease and other clot disorders like Factor V , Factor iii, eNOS

* Pancreatitis, inflammation of the pancreas

* HIV infection

* Radiation therapy or chemotherapy

* Autoimmune diseases

* Decompression sickness, a condition that occurs when the body is subjected to a sudden reduction in surrounding pressure, causing the formation of gas bubbles in the blood

Symptoms of Avascular Necrosis

In its early stages, AVN typically cause no symptoms; however, as the disease progresses it becomes painful. 

At first, you may experience pain when you put pressure on the affected bone. Then, pain may become more constant. 

If the disease progresses and the bone and surrounding joint collapse, you may experience severe pain that interferes with your ability to use your joint. 

The time between the first symptoms and collapse of the bone may range from several months to more than a few years

Published by ChronicallyGratefulDebla

The body always knows what to do to heal itself. The challenge is listening and doing what your body needs. I was diagnosed with Osteoarthritis in 2012, Avascular Necrosis aka Osteonecrosis in my knee in 2014 and Factor V Leiden hetero, and Spondylolisthesis 2016 Health Advocate-Health Activist-World Changer Love photography, cooking, hiking, walking ,traveling and learning to live a new normal since my diagnosis. My Links Facebook Main Profile https://www.facebook.com/debbie.briglovichandio Main Blog www.ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com Twitter - https://twitter.com/debbiea001 Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/debbiea_1962 and https://www.instagram.com/chronicallygratefulme Support Group Avascular Necrosis/Osteonecrosis Support Int’l https://m.facebook.com/groups/DeadBoneDiseaseAvn Awareness for Avascular Necrosis & Other Conditions of The Bone and Joints https://www.facebook.com/AvascularNecrosisAndBoneDiseaseAwareness/ Avascular Necrosis Awareness Day November 29 – working with elected officials to get this recognized in all states https://www.facebook.com/AwarenessByDebla/ Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis Knowledge and Education https://www.facebook.com/AvascularNecrosisEducation/ Facebook Link https://m.facebook.com/ChronicallyGrateful.Me/

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