What is Spondylolithesis?

I was diagnosed April 2016 with Spondylolithesis in my L5 S1

Spondylolisthesis is a condition in which one bone in your back (vertebra) slides forward over the bone below it. …


 This causes me intense back pain and numbness or weakness in one or both legs.
It’s crazy how depending where or how I sit my legs yes both legs go numb

You have pain when you walk, pain when you sit, pain when you stand somedays it’s overwhelming 

I’m a grade one at least I was  in April 2016

Well let’s say since 2012

You see I had a back issue in 2012 went to my former dr

Who ordered Xray on my back, I was told I had OA 

I was never told I had Spondylolithesis or any slippage 

I found out I had Spondylolithesis and a par fracture in 2016 under the care of my new amazing PCP. 
In my opinion if you want better health care see a woman doctor. 

Xray from April 2016 above 

Xray from 2012

A commonly adopted method of grading spondylolisthesis is the Meyerding classification, based on the ratio of [overhanging part of the superior vertebral body] to [anteroposterior length of the adjacent inferior vertebral body]: 
grade I: 0-25%

grade II: 26-50% 

grade III: 51-75% 

grade IV: 76-100%  

grade V (spondyloptosis): >100%

I went to p t a few times for Spondylolithesis in 2016

It helped some but pain never really went away. 

Here are some videos I use at home as well

#Spondylolithesis 

#ChronicLife

#ChronicPain

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2 thoughts on “What is Spondylolithesis?

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  1. After reading your ABOUT page I see you have multiple conditions that contribute to various symptoms. I hope you find the following beneficial.
    A grade 1 non traumatic spondylolisthesis typically is asymptomatic. I have seen and treated many patients with various forms of spondylolytic conditions that were diagnosed as a causative a factor in their symptomatology. Commonly, my examination did not come to this conclusion. Degenerative changes causing mechanical dysfunction typically produce inflammatory changes that create the pain you discuss. In your case, the nerve outlet does not appear compromised, although inflammation in this region can stimulate nerve pain. PROPER exercises done CORRECTLY can help support the region and reduce symptomatic pain. Correcting the biomechanical dysfunction (if one exists ) (commonly, but not always) below the level of the spondylolisthesis restores proper motion correcting the ROOT CAUSE of the inflammation. This also helps reduce the speed of progressive degeneration and helps to stabilize a grade 1 status.

    THIS IS NOT A DIAGNOSIS OR TREATMENT RECOMMENDATION.

    It is my attempt to share clinically relevant information you can discuss with a qualified licensed chiropractic physician preferably one with advanced biomechanical and neurological training (if you choose to.) Most traditional family doctors have limited expertise in these areas. This should not be taken in a disparaging manner. Most chiropractic physicians have limited training in pharmacology. Each discipline offers a different type on health care service; both of which are relevant and important.

    I hope you find this information helpful as you manage your ongoing health maladies. Wishing you many pain free days filled with joy and happiness.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you , yes I do follow several stretching exercises I learned while in p t.
      They help some. But from all the muscular skeletal issues I have Spondylolithesis seems to be the one that just is constant discomfort..

      Thanks for your information, I appreciate it very much.

      Have a wonderful day.

      Liked by 1 person

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