Chilled to the Bone: Tips for Icy Aches and Pains and Calcium and Vitamin D

As winter creeps ever closer, Ohioans are about to be reminded that they live in a state where temperatures reaching down to the teens and single digits with the wind chill.

Pain can become worse if you live in cold climates especially bone pain. We have to eat very healthy and try to move even if its indoors.

Ways to ease pain but pain free mmmm not always

How to Ease Worsening Winter Joint Pain

Aching joints can cause pain any time of the year, but sensitivity tends to spike when temperatures drop. Winter weather conditions tend to keep people indoors and inactive. Combined with the increased chill, a sedentary lifestyle can worsen joint pain and rheumatic conditions during the winter months.

But the next time you feel a snowfall coming on from the ache in your knee, turn to one of these six reliefs for winter joint pain.

  1. Dress Warmly

Wear extra layers in the areas you’re prone to aching joints. An insulated pair of gloves or fleece-lined pants will keep you warm and relieved.

  1. Keep Active

A study published in the Journal of Physical Activity revealed that sedentary time in Chicago increased by over three hours between November and June. Staying active is an essential part of fighting joint pain, so pursue indoor activities like the treadmill, elliptical or stationary bike. If you’re aching but not arthritic, consider yoga or Pilates.

  1. Warm Up in Water

Swimming in a heated pool is a great way to get some necessary winter exercise while soothing your bones. Warm baths can also ease the pain, but give your body temperature time to normalize before going outside!

  1. Eat Well

Ease aching joints during the cold months with a balanced diet of lean protein, fats and fiber. Drink lots of water and eat at least two portions of fish a week, keeping your saturated fat, refined carbohydrates and sugar intake as low as possible.

Supplements for vitamin D, C and K can sometimes help, as well as fish oil, cod liver oil and some over-the-counter anti-inflammatory options like aspirin. Consult your primary care physician for more information.

  1. Treat with a Massage

Winter is especially rough when you have a rheumatic condition. Take this time to treat yourself to a massage to ease cramped muscles, or explore acupuncture for a nontraditional approach to joint pain.

  1. Stay Safe

The cold does enough damage to your joints without getting an injury involved. Wear solid and supportive boots when you go out, and be extra careful of ice!

7. Heat Wraps!! I love Thermacare Heat wraps they help ease joint pain and warm the joints all at the same time.

8. Curcumin  – Its great but not everyone can take it so check with your doctor.I take Terry Naturally Curamed 375  Brand  It contains a clinically proven curcumin that is significantly better absorbed than turmeric or plain curcumin products.

Now For the Vitamin D – Don’t Forget Your D and Calcium 

Known as the sunshine vitamin, Vitamin D plays an important role in your bone health.1 It is mostly made by the body through exposure to sunlight. This is unique to vitamin D since most vitamins come from the foods you eat. Having too much or too little vitamin D in your body can affect the amount of calcium in your bones and can take a toll on your overall bone health:

Low levels of vitamin D can lead to decreased bone mass (osteoporosis) which can increase your risk of fractures.

Too much vitamin D can lead to calcium deposits in the kidneys (kidney stones), or calcium build-up in other soft tissues like the heart, lungs, and blood vessels.

More than 90% of a person’s vitamin D requirement tends to come from our casual exposure to sunlight. This poses some unique challenges for those  of us whose environments limit our exposure to the sun.

When sun exposure are limited, you can get vitamin D naturally from a few foods, including egg yolks or fatty fish such as salmon or mackerel.

This winter, increase your vitamin D intake and keep your bones strong by reading nutritional labels and seeking out products during your regular grocery shop that are fortified with vitamin D. It also never hurts to add a little bit more sunlight to your day!

The best way to get more calcium is from your diet. You probably already know that dairy products — such as milk, cheese, and yogurt — provide calcium. Other foods that are high in calcium include:

Spinach – Kale – Okra – Collards – Soybeans – White beans

Some fish, like sardines, salmon, perch, and rainbow trout

Foods that are calcium-fortified, such as some orange juice, oatmeal, and breakfast cereal

Foods that provide vitamin D include:

Fatty fish, like tuna, mackerel, and salmon

Foods fortified with vitamin D, like some dairy products, orange juice, soy milk, and cereals

Beef liver – Cheese – Egg yolks

To get vitamin D from food, fish is a good option. Three ounces of cooked salmon has more than 450 international units (IU) and theres supplements as well.

How Much Do You Need?

Here’s how much calcium and vitamin D you need every day, according to the Institute of Medicine.

**If your low your doctor may have you take more until you are in normal range**

Calcium

Children 1-3 years old: 700 milligrams (mg)

Children 4-8 years old: 1,000 mg

Children 9-18 years old: 1,300 mg

Adults 19-50: 1,000 mg

Women 51 to 70: 1,200 mg

Men 51 to 70: 1,000 mg

Women and men 71 and over: 1,200 mg

Vitamin D

Age 1-70: 600 IU

Age 71 and older: 800 IU

winter.

references

https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/InteractiveNutritionFactsLabel/factsheets/Vitamin_and_Mineral_Chart.pdf

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/how-much-vitamin-d-to-take#section3

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2 thoughts on “Chilled to the Bone: Tips for Icy Aches and Pains and Calcium and Vitamin D

Add yours

  1. I love how informative you are especially with that of Man’s first medicine herbs. ( I vote YEAH! on legalization but that IS NOT a Marijuana reference) lol Laugh, not cry!

    May I mention for you or others a new supplement for me, it is MSM & CoQ10.

    I could tell a difference in my circulation in a matter of days. Especially to my painful legs.

    I believe I was over-treated with Steroids causing my AVN. I wasn’t on them daily or really a lot. I know it warns of some things, but No where did I see Steroids will eat your bones and joints, they ache like a hungry stomach does for food.
    Yessss, lol I have quite a few Blogs, I apparently kept signing in different ways. I am working on consolidating. @Goldenrule4all @Elementelcircumspection @stacesonshine I think!

    Like

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