All About Our Knees Part 2

Types of Pain

What are the different types of knee pain?

Knee pain has many causes. Some of the most common include:

Osteoarthritis

Arthritis is a chronic condition that causes joint inflammation. Symptoms include redness, warmth, swelling, tenderness and pain. Up to 30 percent of the population may have knee osteoarthritis, or “wear and tear” arthritis. This is the gradual breakdown of the cartilage in the knee. Also called degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis usually develops over years and often is found in patients who have had a knee infection or injury and those who are overweight.

As cartilage wears away, the bones around it can grow thicker and develop bony spurs. This can lead to increased friction between the bones and disrupted movement in your knee. This also can lead to problems with the synovium, a membrane in your knee that produces a liquid to keep your cartilage slippery. This membrane can become inflamed and make too much fluid. This results in swelling, or “water on the knee.” In the most severe cases, the knee can become deformed as the continued friction wears away the bone.

Common symptoms of osteoarthritis include pain, stiffness, tenderness, a limited range of motion and a grating sensation when you bend your knee. The pain is usually worse after activity.

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis can affect joints on both sides of the body (both knees, both hands and/or both wrists). In rheumatoid arthritis, your body’s cells attack your own tissues. While in most people symptoms develop gradually over years, they can appear rapidly. Rheumatoid arthritis affects three to five times more women than men and often presents between the ages of 20 and 50.

Rheumatoid arthritis may be related to a combination of abnormal immunity and genetic, environmental and hormonal factors. Over time, rheumatoid arthritis can cause cartilage to wear away, swelling in the synovium, and excess fluid in the knee. In later stages, bones can rub against each other.

Bursitis

Bursitis is the inflammation of any of the fluid-filled sacs (bursae) protecting the body’s joints. This is usually caused by repetitive motions or by a stress such as kneeling. Sometimes, a sudden injury can cause bursitis.

Tendonitis

The tendons – rope-like tissues connecting muscles to bone at the knee and other joints – can become painfully inflamed by repetitive and strenuous movement. Tendonitis is a common sports injury, caused by overuse of the same parts of the body. Patellar tendinitis, or “jumper’s knee,” is an inflammation or irritation of the tendon between the knee cap and the shin bone.

Baker’s cyst

A lump behind your knee could be a Baker’s cyst. A Baker’s cyst, also called a popliteal cyst, is a fluid-filled pocket that causes swelling and tightness behind the knee. Often, it is not painful. A Baker’s cyst is typically associated with arthritis or a cartilage tear, conditions that can cause your knee to produce too much fluid. The key to treatment is to find the underlying cause of the fluid accumulating in the Baker’s cyst.

Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS)

Knee pain or discomfort while walking up and down stairs, jumping or squatting may be symptoms of patellofemoral pain syndrome. This common knee problem is felt toward the front of the knee. It can cause a grinding sensation when bending or straightening your leg, and can cause your knee to occasionally buckle. Sometimes called “runner’s knee,” patellofemoral pain syndrome may be caused by a kneecap that is not aligned properly, overuse, injury, excess weight or when the cartilage in the knee cap is worn significantly.

Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis

Osteonecrosis of the knee (also known as avascular necrosis) is a painful condition that occurs when the blood supply to a section of bone in the femur (thighbone) or tibia (shinbone) is disrupted. The pain varies from no pain to severe hot pain. Like bathe feeling of being hit in knee with a hot iron or sharp stabbing lightening bolt pain. Treatment can vary depending on stage from Prp injections to Total Knee Replacement.

SPONK Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the knee comes on suddenly.

Published by ChronicallyGratefulDebla

The body always knows what to do to heal itself. The challenge is listening and doing what your body needs. I was diagnosed with Osteoarthritis in 2012, Avascular Necrosis aka Osteonecrosis in my knee in 2014 and Factor V Leiden hetero, and Spondylolisthesis 2016 Health Advocate-Health Activist-World Changer Love photography, cooking, hiking, walking ,traveling and learning to live a new normal since my diagnosis. My Links Facebook Main Profile https://www.facebook.com/debbie.briglovichandio Main Blog www.ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com Twitter - https://twitter.com/debbiea001 Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/debbiea_1962 and https://www.instagram.com/chronicallygratefulme Support Group Avascular Necrosis/Osteonecrosis Support Int’l https://m.facebook.com/groups/DeadBoneDiseaseAvn Awareness for Avascular Necrosis & Other Conditions of The Bone and Joints https://www.facebook.com/AvascularNecrosisAndBoneDiseaseAwareness/ Avascular Necrosis Awareness Day November 29 – working with elected officials to get this recognized in all states https://www.facebook.com/AwarenessByDebla/ Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis Knowledge and Education https://www.facebook.com/AvascularNecrosisEducation/ Facebook Link https://m.facebook.com/ChronicallyGrateful.Me/

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