How to Limit Our Joint Pain When the Seasons and Temperatures Change

Can you feel that storm coming in your knees? Back pain increases with a cold front? So can lots of people with arthritis. Some doctors think that these stories of weather causing joint pain are old wives’ tales, but science is backing up the phenomenon.

Are You Weather Sensitive?

Some people are definitely more sensitive to weather and specifically the changes in the weather than others. .

So it is more important that we take steps now to limit the onset of more pain and potential and joint damage. Here are a few helpful ways to try and

limit our seasonal symptoms:

• Increase vitamin consumption—a good diet is foundational to your fight against joint pain and damage, but diet may not be enough. Some studies suggest that arthritis patients don’t get enough Vitamin D, so it is important to load up on Vitamin D-rich foods.  Many experts recommend that you take pill supplements of Vitamins D, E, A and K for optimal joint health.

• Stay hydrated I am terrible at getting enough water especially if it’s cooler dehydration puts unnecessary stress on our joints. Drinking liquids regularly ensures that there is enough lubricant in your joints and that your joint tissue is operating at peak performance. There is also some evidence that lack of hydration may make you more sensitive to pain.

• Remain warm—it is important to keep your joints as protected from the cold as possible.  Wear extra layers when going outside to mitigate any damage the cold may inflict on you. I personally love Thermacare Heat wraps I buy them in bulk because when winter hits this is the only thing I truly can count on to keep my joints warm for hours . I put one on and go shopping a small walk and don’t feel as if my joints are going to snap.

• Maintain activity levels—you may not feel like going for a walk in a rain or snow storm, but you should still keep active. Lack of use can lock up joints and aggravate pain symptoms, so continue with your stationary bike or yoga even in the cold weather months.

• Warm water—whether it is swimming in a heated pool or soaking a hot bath, water can do wonders for your joints.  The penetrating warmth can loosen stiff joints and alleviate joint pain.  After soaking, gradually re-acclimate to the cold to prevent a shock to your system.No doubt I miss taking a bath so for me a warm shower also helps.

• OTC medications—depending on how severe your joint pain is, your doctor may recommend over-the counter medications like Tylenol or aspirin. Many of these medications can prove just as effective at relieving pain and inflammation as more potent prescription drugs.  Always discuss all of the drugs you take with your physician beforehand. And now they have Voltaren gel sold over the counter to rub on sore bones.

• Massage therapy—many patients suffer from muscle pain as well as pain from their joints.  Long-term pain can produce muscle contractions, but a massage can help relax tense muscles as well as stiff joints. There is also a powerful endorphin rush following a massage that will provide considerable pain relief.

• Restful sleep—many people experience changes in sleep patterns when the day shortens or lengthens.  Maintaining a restful sleep schedule is critical to healthy joints and pain mitigation.  Stick to your regular sleep schedule as much as possible. If you are having difficulty, discuss your remedy options with your doctor.

• Physical therapy—if you are not already seeing a physical therapist for your joint health, then a new season may be the ideal time.  Not only will you learn more about how to limit joint damage and optimize your health, but the therapy sessions should improve your joint function and pain symptoms.

• Remember Always talk to your pcp or ortho before starting or stopping anything new.

Disclaimer this blog is for entertainment purposes only and is never to be taken as medical advice.

Wishing you all a pain free day

Autumn In Millcreek Park Youngstown Ohio
by Deb Andio
17 October,2020

World Arthritis Awareness Day

There are over 360 million people worldwide that live with some form of arthritis.

Fast Facts

  • In the United States, 23% of all adults—over 54 million people—have arthritis.
  • About 24 million adults are limited in their activities from arthritis, and more than 1 in 4 adults with arthritis report severe joint pain.
  • Arthritis commonly occurs with other chronic diseases, like diabetes, heart disease, and obesity, and can make it harder for people to manage these conditions.

Does the Key To Anti-Ageing Lie in Our Bones?

This is not my Story at al but because I am an advocate for all issues with bones and joints I wanted ti share this

Osteocalcin, a hormone produced in the bones, could one day provide treatments for age-related issues such as muscle and memory loss.

The Guardian

  • David Cox

GettyImages-103227116.jpg

Bones are live organs, which play a role in regulating a range of bodily processes. Photograph: Doug Armand / Getty Images.

Gérard Karsenty was a young scientist trying to make a name for himself in the early 1990s when he first stumbled upon a finding that would go on to transform our understanding of bone, and the role it plays in our body.

Karsenty had become interested in osteocalcin, one of the most abundant proteins in bone. He suspected that it played a crucial role in bone remodelling – the process by which our bones continuously remove and create new tissue – which enables us to grow during childhood and adolescence, and also recover from injuries.

Intending to study this, he conducted a genetic knockout experiment, removing the gene responsible for osteocalcin from mice. However to his dismay, his mutant mice did not appear to have any obvious bone defects at all. “For him, it was initially a total failure,” says Mathieu Ferron, a former colleague of Karsenty who now heads a research lab studying bone biology at IRCM in Montreal. “In those days it was super-expensive to do modification in the mouse genome.”

But then Karsenty noticed something unexpected. While their bones had developed normally, the mice appeared to be both noticeably fat and cognitively impaired.

“Mice that don’t have osteocalcin have increased circulating glucose, and they tend to look a bit stupid,” says Ferron. “It may sound silly to say this, but they don’t learn very well, they appear kind of depressed. But it took Karsenty and his team some time to understand how a protein in bone could be affecting these functions. They were initially a bit surprised and terrified as it didn’t really make any sense to them.”

Almost 15 years later, Karsenty would publish the first of a series of landmark papers that would revolutionise our perspective on bone and the skeleton in general. We used to view our skeleton as primarily a mechanical structure whose main role is to serve as a scaffold for the rest of the body. But our bones are very much live organs, which we now believe play a role in regulating a whole range of vital bodily processes ranging from memory to appetite, muscle health, fertility, metabolism and many others.

“The idea that bone is just a simple organ that’s separated from everything else as a mineralised tissue, and that doesn’t communicate – that’s changed,” says Thomas Clemens, professor of orthopaedic surgery at the Johns Hopkins Center for Musculoskeletal Research. “Karsenty has ushered in the idea that bone is involved in communicating with other tissues in the body that wasn’t really understood or investigated before.”

We now know that bones communicate by participating in a network of signals to other organs through producing their own hormones, proteins that circulate in the blood. Karsenty’s mice eventually led him to realise that osteocalcin was in fact one such hormone, and understanding its links to regulating so many of these functions could have future implications in terms of public health interventions.

“The idea that bone could produce a hormone affecting metabolism or even your liver initially came as a bit of a shock,” says Ferron. “People did not expect that. But other scientists have since replicated the results, and even discovered new hormones also produced by bones. It’s opened up a completely new field in bone research.”

Reversing Age-Related Decline

As we age, all of us inevitably lose bone. Research shows that humans reach peak bone mass in their 20s; from then onwards, it is a slow decline that can eventually lead to frailty and diseases such as osteoporosis in old age.

Over the past decade, new findings have suggested that this reduction in bone mass may also be linked to the weakening of muscles – referred to in medical terms as sarcopenia – as well as the memory and cognitive problems that many of us experience as we grow older. This appears to be connected to the levels of osteocalcin in the blood, through its role as a “master regulator”, influencing many other hormonal processes in the body.

“Osteocalcin acts in muscle to increase the ability to produce ATP, the fuel that allows us to exercise,” says Karsenty. “In the brain, it regulates the secretion of most neurotransmitters that are needed to have memory. The circulating levels of osteocalcin declines in humans around mid-life, which is roughly the time when these physiological functions, such as memory and the ability to exercise, begin to decline.”

But intriguingly in recent years, Karsenty has conducted a series of experiments in which he has shown that by increasing the levels of osteocalcin in older mice through injections, you can actually reverse many of these age-related ailments.

“Osteocalcin seems to be able to reverse manifestations of ageing in the brain and in muscle,” he says. “What is remarkable is that if you give osteocalcin to old mice, you restore memory and you restore the ability to exercise to the levels seen in a young mouse. That makes it potentially extremely attractive from a medical point of view.”

Scientists have also found that for humans, one way of naturally maintaining the levels of this hormone in the blood, even as we age, is through exercise, something that makes intuitive sense, as physical activity has long been known to have anti-ageing properties. Ferron is hoping that these findings can be used to support public health messages regarding the importance of staying active through middle age and later life.

“If you exercise regularly, then it stimulates your bone to make more osteocalcin, and that will have these beneficial effects on muscle and brain,” he says. “From epidemiological studies, we know that people who are very active tend to have less of a cognitive decline with age than sedentary people. With time, maybe people will be more aware of this connection, and think of their bone health as being just as important as other aspects of staying healthy.”

Ongoing research in this area also suggests that exercising more during the teenage years and early adulthood can continue to have a protective effect on bone and other aspects of health much later in life.

“I think this could reinforce the message that it’s important for people to be active during adolescence and early adult years,” Ferron says. “This means they reach a higher peak bone mass, which will protect them from age-related problems linked to osteocalcin decline.”

Utilizing Bone Hormones To Develop New Drugs

Osteocalcin is not the only bone hormone to have caught the attention of scientists, however. At the Mayo Clinic, Sundeep Khosla has been studying a hormone called DPP4, which is made by cells on the outer layers of bone, called osteoclasts, and appears to play a role in how bone regulates blood sugar.

Khosla is particularly interested in this hormone because the drug denosumab – which is clinically prescribed to osteoporosis patients to try and slow down the rate of bone loss – seems to have a positive effect on DPP4 as well. In a study of osteoporosis patients taking denosumab published earlier this year, he noticed that those also suffering from diabetes experienced an improvement in their symptoms.

“This shows that maybe this drug can treat both osteoporosis and diabetes at the same time,” says Khosla. “We’re now looking to follow up on these observations and test this through a randomised control trial.”

However, osteocalcin, with its potential to prevent many aspects of age-related decline, remains the major topic of interest in bone research. Given that so many people ignore public health guidelines regarding exercise – in 2017, the British Heart Foundation reported that around 20 million adults in the UK are insufficiently active – Karsenty is working on a means of artificially increasing the levels of osteocalcin in the blood and has even filed a patent on using it to treat cognitive disorders.

“This is not easy, but what we are hoping to do is to deliver osteocalcin perhaps through developing a molecule which regulates osteocalcin,” he says. “We’re exploring various ways of doing this, but the idea would be eventually to have something which could be used to treat age-related diseases such as sarcopenia and memory decline. This is really going to profit the elderly the most, but anyone with a decline in muscle function, because of a hip fracture or another condition, could also benefit from this treatment.”

Ferron says that such a treatment would differ from current medications designed to improve bone health in osteoporosis, as they only work by blocking bone loss. A drug targeting osteocalcin would aim to achieve wider health benefits through stimulating bone gain.

However, there are still plenty of hurdles to overcome. For example, simply injecting a form of osteocalcin is unlikely to be sufficient to achieve a therapeutic benefit in humans.

“Treatments like that tend to be more costly and more difficult as protein injections don’t have a very long half life,” says Ferron. “My lab is developing a stabilised form of osteocalcin so it can stay longer in the body, but the best solution would be to have some sort of small pharmacological molecules that could be put in a pill to target the receptor of osteocalcin to stimulate its activity. So that’s the idea I see for the future.”

But Karsenty’s findings have also led scientists to ponder a somewhat profound question: how did bones develop the ability to produce hormones such as osteocalcin in the first place?

The scientist himself believes that the answer lies deep in our evolutionary past. “I think that evolution has invented osteocalcin as a survival hormone,” he says. “Because to escape predators, you need your bones to be able to signal to your muscles to run, which is mediated by osteocalcin. To survive, you also need to remember where to find food or where a predator was an hour ago, and such memory processes are regulated by osteocalcin. More and more, we think that it evolved as a hormone to help animals escape danger.”

David Cox is a freelance health journalist and former neuroscientist.

Not All Pain is Created Equal

Not All Pain is Created Equal

When we hear the word arthritis, we think of our grandparents talking about their joint aches. We had no idea it could happen to children and people of all ages.

There are more than 100 types of arthritis and related diseases, and not all arthritis pain is alike. It can originate in different areas of our body, triggering chemical and electrical signals that move from the area of pain or injury up to brain and back to let us know that hurt

I have a high tolerance for pain so when I am hurting, I know it’s bad. Everyone’s threshold and tolerance for pain is unique. Then, there are days I bump my hand or arm and I see stars. I just don’t understand it….

Living and coping with chronic pain can be the hardest part of living with a joint disease. It can disrupt every part of our life and many parts of your life can also affect your pain.

Facts on Pain

  • As many as 75 percent of those 65 and older report persistent pain from arthritis and other chronic conditions.
  • Almost four out of five older adults have multiple chronic conditions besides arthritis, like diabetes, heart disease and obesity. And the combination can heighten pain and discomfort.
  • Women are more likely to develop chronic pain and often feel pain more intensely than men.
  • In the United States, 23% of all adults—over 54 million people—have arthritis. About 24 million adults are limited in their activities from arthritis, and more than 1 in 4 adults with arthritis report severe joint pain

National Prevalence

  • From 2013–2015, an estimated 54.4 million US adults (22.7%) annually had ever been told by a doctor that they had some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia. Learn more about national arthritis statistics.
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Throughout September, I want to help bring attention to living with chronic pain and the suffering arthritis frequently causes. Let your family and friends know it’s Pain Awareness Month and ask them to help spread the word about how important it is to find more effective treatments and a cure for all forms of joint pain and arthritis.

Most of all, make sure you take care of yourself.

Tips on taking care of yourself and living with arthritis

References

Managing a flare – Arthritis Foundation- https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/managing-pain/pain-relief-solutions/tips-for-managing-an-arthritis-flare

Exercise and kids with JA – https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/physical-activity/getting-started/best-exercises-for-children-with-ja

Arthritis , Autoimmune and Rheumatology Research Cure Arthritis https://curearthritis.org/arthritis-research

God will never give us a schedule so full that’s there is no time for him

You want success meditate in Gods word in the day and in the night. Just 10 minutes a day

It will change your life

Essentials of Meditation on Gods Word

Reading

Believing

Absorbing it

Applying to life

Obeying

I acknowledge that he is my God and I commit myself to God.

Read

Joshua 1:9

Just read it and absorb it.

Watch what God will do in your life .

How many blessings have we missed because we think we got everything handled.

It takes courage to be obedient to god.

Because sometimes we just don’t understand it. But keep reading just 5-10 minutes 2x a day

Read proverbs- if you read one proverb a day it will take you a month,

the book of psalms will take 6-8 months

Try it I know it will change your life.

2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, guaranteeing and protecting women’s constitutional right to vote.

The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, guaranteeing and protecting women’s constitutional right to vote.

This historic centennial offers an unparalleled opportunity to commemorate a milestone of democracy and to explore its relevance to the issues of equal rights today.

The Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative, a collaboration of women-centered institutions, organizations, and scholars from across the US, works to ensure that this anniversary, and the 72-year fight to achieve it, are commemorated and celebrated throughout the United States.

From 2019-2020, the US will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment and women’s constitutional right to vote.

Suffragists began their organized fight for women’s equality in 1848 when they demanded the right to vote during the first women’s rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York. For the next 72 years, women leaders lobbied, marched, picketed, and protested for the right to the ballot.

The U.S. House of Representatives finally approved the Susan B. Anthony Amendment, which guaranteed women the right to vote, on May 21, 1919. The U.S. Senate followed two weeks later, and the 19th Amendment went to the states, where it had to be ratified by 3/4ths of the-then-48 states to be added to the Constitution. By a vote of 50-47,

Tennessee became the last state needed to ratify the 19th Amendment on August 18, 1920. Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby issued a proclamation declaring the 19th Amendment ratified and part of the US Constitution on August 26, 1920, forever protecting American women’s right to vote.

Today, more than 68 million women vote in elections because of the courageous suffragists who never gave up the fight for equality. Explore the resources below to learn more about the story of the 19th Amendment and women’s fight for the ballot.

The Suff Buffs- Learn More About Great Women

vote

Dealing with Joint Pain in the Pandemic

How do I deal with my knee and back pain until the orthopedic doctors start seeing patients again?

There are a variety of non-operative treatment options for pain. No one treatment is going to help everyone, and patients need to find the treatments that seem to work the best for them.

Medications I personally cannot take NSAIDS so I reach for

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is an over-the-counter option that is safe and effective for me.

For many Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) – e.g. Ibuprofen and naproxen – may also be helpful. Prescription NSAIDs are also an option to discuss with your health care provider.

Some say medical marijuana helps them. I’ve never tried it so I cannot comment.

Supplements, such as glucosamine/chondroitin, are generally safe and may be helpful in reducing some arthritic pain. Also talk to you doctor about curcumin supplements tablets .

I drink Turmeric tea aka golden milk it is a natural anti-inflammatory agent.

Exercise helps me. I’m not talking about running or walking a marathon.

Just 1-2 miles once or twice a day. Makes me feel good especially in summer. My joints love the heat.

I have a daily exercise regimen, specifically designed for me and my knee osteonecrosis osteoarthritis, and this back pain that is really an out of the blue pain.

With osteonecrosis moving is critically important for maintaining strength in muscles supporting the joints , reducing pain and it’s also great for stress.

It is important to be as active as your joints allow and find a variety of stretching and strengthening exercises that you perform daily, without increasing your pain.

A good source for exercise instruction for arthritis may be found at you ortho office maybe they can email you some ideas.

Crutches, a walker, ice/heat treatments and a knee brace may also be helpful in managing your hip and/or knee pain.

Weight Loss and Diet

The covid 19 is a little saying that explains what is happened to many since the pandemic.

And extra 19 pounds can cause the joints to really hurt.

Many patients with osteonecrosis and arthritis are carrying a few extra pounds and weight loss reduces stress across our joints.

We put 3-5X our body weight across our hip and knee joints with activity, particularly stair climbing and getting in and out of a chair. Every 10 pounds of extra weight carried results in 50 pounds of weight bearing pressure across the hips and knees!

A healthy diet is important for general health and weight loss, and some may find benefit from focusing on an “anti-inflammatory” diet. The anti-inflammatory diet is a diet which includes tomatoes, olive oil, green leafy vegetables, nuts, fatty fish, and fresh fruit, particularly blueberries, strawberries, cherries and oranges. Foods thought to cause inflammation, and to avoid, include white bread and pastries, French fries, soda, margarine and red meat.

In summary: stay active, eat healthy, maintain social distancing as instructed and maintain a positive attitude.

Please know that your orthopedic provider and all pcp ‘s are also anxious to get back to “business as usual” and help you to resolve your arthritic pain!

Check out my other posts on great recipes

Please follow like and share to get updates on my latest posts

Wishing you love, good health and a pain free day

Love

Deb

https://flexitarianforlife.wordpress.com/

http://www.ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com

All About Knee Pain part 6 of 6

Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy is a relatively minor surgery performed with the use of a miniature camera (arthroscope). Arthroscopic knee surgery is commonly used to diagnose and treat knee pain. This surgery takes about an hour. During the procedure, an orthopedic surgeon can repair tissue and cartilage tears, or scrape and cut away bone and cartilage fragments to ease knee pain. Advances in arthroscopy have made this process more accurate and effective than ever before.

Recovery – In most cases, arthroscopy is an outpatient procedure. Patients often can return to office work within a week and to a normal lifestyle within a month or two. Physical therapy is important for recovering mobility.

Benefits – This surgery involves small incisions for the arthroscope and other tools, meaning a quicker recovery. Arthroscopy can provide relief from knee pain and improve mobility, allowing patients to return to a normal, active lifestyle with greater comfort.

Who is a candidate? – Patients with knee problems such as ACL tears, meniscus tears and cartilage wear are good candidates for arthroscopic surgery. The surgery can be performed on patients of all ages, depending on the condition of the knee.

Risks – Knee arthroscopy is a safe procedure with few complications. Risks may include swelling, stiffness, bleeding, blood clots, infection or continuing knee problems

There are three compartments to the knee. In a resurfacing, only the damaged areas are replaced.

Focal Knee Resurfacing

For the right patients, resurfacing is a great alternative to a knee replacement. This newer procedure replaces only a specific area of the knee cartilage surface. Broken down cartilage is removed and replaced with a custom-made, metal implant that is cemented to the bone.

Recovery – Patients are encouraged to walk soon after surgery. Many are able to drive after a week or two. Physical therapy is an important part of getting back mobility in your knee.

Benefits – Knee resurfacing may be the wave of the future in treating severe knee pain. It is less invasive than a knee replacement. Because less bone is cut away, patients are left with more of a “real knee.” It also can feel more natural than a knee replacement because the implant is custom-made to fit a patient’s knee. Recovery can be shorter than it is with a knee replacement.

Who is a candidate? – Knee resurfacing may be ideal for younger, more active patients. It can be effective for patients with focal cartilage defects and early to mid-stage osteoarthritis.

Risks – Possible (but rare) complications of surgery include blood clots, infection and nerve damage. Long-term complications may include continued pain, infection or a loosening of the implant.

Durability – Knee resurfacing is a new procedure and is predicted to last 10 to 15 years.

Partial knee replacement

Partial knee replacement may be an option for you if parts of your knee are free of disease or injury. This minimally invasive procedure may be possible when just one or two of the three compartments of your knee are damaged. In a partial knee replacement, cartilage and bone is shaved away and replaced with an implant in the affected compartment(s). This means a smaller incision and a shorter recovery time than with a total knee replacement.

Recovery – Patients usually can start moving the knee the day after surgery. Physical therapy is key to recovery and regaining mobility. Patients can be back to full activity in about a month. However, high-impact exercises, jogging and running are discouraged because implants have a surface that can wear.

Benefits – Compared to a full knee replacement, a partial knee replacement has a shorter recovery time, less post-operative pain, less blood loss during surgery and a smaller incision. In addition, more of the patient’s healthy bone and soft tissues are preserved, which means you could a have better range of motion and knee function than you would with a full knee replacement. Patients who have partial knee replacements also are still candidates for a full knee replacement, if needed, down the road.

Who is a candidate? – The ideal candidate has osteoarthritis that is severe (but not advanced) and whose pain can no longer be managed with conservative treatments. This is not a procedure for patients with significant deformity.

Risks – Possible (but rare) complications of surgery include blood clots, infection, nerve damage and other risks. Long-term complications may include continued pain, infection, and a failure, loosening or dislocation of the prosthesis.

Durability – Approximately 85 percent of knee implants will last 20 years.

Total knee replacement

When all of the parts of a knee need repair, total knee replacement may be the best option. This involves removing brokendown cartilage and bone and replacing it with the right artificial joint for you. This prosthesis is made of plastic and metal and provides fluid and free movement. It is attached to the bone with acrylic cement or can be press-fit, allowing bone to grow into the implant. Surgeons also perform any needed ligament repair. To work properly, the new joint needs support from the patient’s muscles and ligaments.

Total knee replacement in our aging and active culture is increasingly common. By 2030, it is estimated that more than 3 million total knee replacements will be performed each year.

Recovery – Following a total knee replacement, most patients spend only one to two days in the hospital however, many are done as an outpatient procedure. Patients can stand and move the joint the day after surgery and use a cane, walker or similar aid for several weeks. Physical therapy is crucial to restore motion to your joint. After six weeks, most patients are able to put full weight on their knee with the use of a cane. Full recovery and rehabilitation typically takes about six months. Patients are able to return to an active lifestyle, except for highimpact activities, such as running and jumping.

Benefits – Most patients experience dramatic improvement and relief from pain within weeks of surgery.

Who is a candidate? – Total knee replacement can be a good option for people with painful knee deformities, severe degenerative changes, or advanced or end-stage arthritis.

Risks – The risk of complications is rare in total knee replacement surgeries, occurring in less than 2 percent of patients. Your surgeon may prescribe blood thinners to prevent blood clots after surgery. Some patients notice some loss of motion, stiffness or pain. For a very small percentage of patients, the joint may fail. Studies have shown this is more common in obese patients.

Durability – Doctors have been performing total knee replacements since the early 1970s, and it is one of the most successful surgeries for knee arthritis. New data suggest that contemporary knee replacements may last more than 30 years. Approximately 85 percent of knee replacements done 20 years ago are still functioning well.

All About Knee Pain Part 5 of 6

Part 5 knee

Treatments

Conservative care

Many types of knee pain can be relieved and/or resolved with conservative treatments such as:

Rest When the knee is injured or is inflamed, as in bursitis, tendonitis or arthritis, it’s important to rest the joint and avoid overuse. That may mean keeping the knee straight (extended) or in positions that limit bending.

Ice/heat Applying ice or cold packs to the knee can reduce inflammation and swelling, especially after an injury. Once swelling is gone, heat may be used to help relax and loosen tissues – although ice is the primary treatment.

Pain relievers Over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medicines can help relieve knee pain, including ibuprofen (Advil®) and naproxen (Aleve®).

Weight loss Your doctor may recommend that you lose weight to reduce pressure on your knee.

Braces In general, knee braces wrap around the knee and leg and help limit unwanted movement while supporting the knee. They are commonly used when knee ligaments are weak, and help to keep the knee from “buckling.” Braces will provide support during healing, but are not a primary treatment for arthritic degeneration.

There is a variety of braces. Functional braces are designed to support knees that have suffered an impact-related injury. Rehabilitative braces provide support when recovering from a surgery or injury. Uploading/offloading braces are used by patients with arthritis and help to stabilize the knee when standing up or sitting down

Physical therapy

Once your doctor diagnoses the cause of your knee pain, physical therapy may be the next step. Physical therapists can show you specific exercise programs that will help you recover from the injury and decrease the pain you are experiencing. They also may demonstrate low-impact stretches and exercises that can strengthen muscles in your knee, improve stability and flexibility, and reduce pressure on the joint. They can advise you on helpful lowimpact aerobic exercises, such as swimming and cycling, that won’t aggravate your knee pain. Physical therapy also is an important part of recovery after knee surgery.

Injections

I personally am not a fan of these. I personally get more pain when o have had them. And they can lead to faster break down of bone tissue and can lead to Osteonecrosis.

Steroid (or more commonly known as cortisone) shots can be placed inside the knee to reduce pain and inflammation.

Another nonsurgical procedure that can provide relief from knee pain is viscosupplementation. Administered in the doctor’s office, this treatment involves injecting a lubricant into the knee. The filler lubricates and adds cushioning to the joint, allowing bones to move more easily and reducing friction.

In some cases, relief from viscosupplementation can last for months. It can be a viable, though short-term, solution for mild to moderate osteoarthritic knee pain.

Prp injections

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy uses injections of a concentration of a patient’s own platelets to accelerate the healing of injured tendons, ligaments, muscles and joints. In this way, PRP injections use each individual patient’s own healing system to improve musculoskeletal problems. I have had this and I had a good result. Healed no but a better outcome and mobility than I had.

Meet Brotha Anthony

This is Anthony Glover and he is a an inspiration and sets a standard that all men should measure up to.

He is the founder of Useful Hands PHX it is an outdoor program designed to empower young men while on their journey to Manhood through hands-on introductory skill training.

From Car care to cooking to pitching a tent to gardening to using a drill etc…

Anthony Glover, simply known in his community as “Brotha Anthony,” is a Phoenix, AZ native. He has made his presence felt in his community through spoken word poetry, event hosting and mentoring of young men with “Fight For Life, No Excuses” Manhood Training Program located in South Phoenix.

He is also the Program Director of “Thunderbirds On The Rise,” a mentoring program for male students of TG Barr Elementary, also located in South Phoenix.

Brotha Anthony desired to find another unique way to connect with and guide young men on their journey to Manhood, especially as it pertains to creating great use and value with their hands.

Ultimately, he envisioned Useful Hands PHX and has plans on teaching young men for many years to come.

This is a fantastic idea, So many young men today don’t have a father figure to look up to and some that do have dads maybe they don’t know all these life skills either.

I find this to be a wonderful idea that can help so many young’s men learn life skills they will always use.

Maybe you could be a volunteer or start your own

To learn more or to donate see link below

Useful Hands phx

Cabbage -Don’t Overlook This Inflammation Fighting Veggie

1. Lowers the Signs of Aging

Cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables contain a high amount of Vitamin C and E, which help in the production of collagen, the compound which keeps the skin elastic and wrinkle-free. Vitamin A along with Vitamin D protects the skin and gives you a youthful skin.

  1. Helps Fight Free Radicals

Cabbage is rich in antioxidants Antioxidants help fight oxidative damage caused by free radicals and prevent a whole range of ailments.

  1. Speeds Up the Recovery Process

Cabbage leaves are used as a poultice. Using these leaves can ease skin eruptions caused by acne, psoriasis, eczema, ulcers, wounds,insect bites and rashes. Grated leaves or blended leaves can be applied directly over the affected area with some dressing for faster healing.

  1. Improves Complexion

Cabbage can also help acne and other skin conditions. Some steamed cabbage leaves compressed in a cotton cloth can be placed on the affected area overnight for best results. The levels of potassium and Vitamin A also improve complexion.

  1. May Provide Relief From Allergies

Cabbages and other cruciferous vegetables of its kind contain anti-inflammatory properties. They are rich in sulforaphane and glutamine which are powerful anti-inflammatory agents. Regular consumption can ease health conditions worsened by inflammation such as allergies, irritation, fever, joint pain and skin disorders.

  1. May Prevent Cancer

The Brassica vegetables such as cabbage contain a significant amount of glucosinolates that have strong anti-cancer properties. These compounds scavenge free radicals which are bad for health and contribute to cancers of different kinds. Red cabbages are particularly loaded with compounds such as sinigrin, lupeol and sulforaphane with anti-cancer properties.

  1. Good for the Digestive Tract

Cabbage is high in fiber, which makes it healthy for the digestive tract. Eating cabbage can provide relief from constipation. This is very effective in treating constipation and related gastrointestinal disorders.

  1. Promotes Weight Loss

As cabbage is loaded with essential nutrients and contains almost no calories or fats, hence it is perfect for people who are on a weight loss diet. If you don’t like to eat cabbage in the form of vegetable, you can drink cabbage juice.

  1. Protects the Eye

Vitamin A which is an essential nutrient for our eyes is present in cabbage and helps maintain good vision. The beta-carotene, an antioxidant present in cabbage is also helpful in preventing macular degeneration and delay the onset of cataracts.

  1. Improves the Health of Hair

Cabbage being rich in many of the essential nutrients helps maintain healthy hair and prevents hair fall. It also prevents dry hair and protects the hair strands from physical damage. Vitamin C which is found in cabbage is essential for the production of the protein keratin which primarily makes up the hair and nails in the body.

  1. Improves the Health of the Heart

Red cabbages are rich in compounds called anthocyanins which give them their characteristic purple color. Studieshave shown a link between diet consisting of foods rich in these compounds and lowering of heart disease. Along with this, cabbages are also good sources of potassium and calcium essential for healthy functioning of the heart.

  1. Good for the Brain

Cabbage is also brain food. Vitamin K and anthocyanins in cabbage promote mental function and focus. Vitamin K is also important to protect the nerve cells from damage and prevent degenerative diseases. Cabbage is also a rich source of iodine which is an essential nutrient for the brain.

  1. Helps Strengthen the Bones

Cabbages are abundant sources of nutrients that are necessary for building strong bones. They are loaded with calcium, magnesium, and potassium which are all essential for strengthening the bones. Eating cabbage may also help in warding off diseases such as osteoporosis.

  1. Regulates Blood Pressure

Red cabbage is an abundant source of anthocyanins which is known to lower blood pressure. Eating cabbage regularly helps maintain normal blood pressure and decreases the risk of heart diseases.

  1. Good for Diabetic Patients

The potassium present in cabbage is not only good for lowering blood pressure but helps maintain blood sugar levels. It also improves mental well being by reducing stress and anxiety.

16. Boosts Immunity

Being loaded with Vitamin C and antioxidants, cabbage helps boost immunity. It supports the immune system and fights off various diseases.

17. Helps Treat Peptic Ulcer

The presence of anti-inflammation compounds such as glucosinolates helps reduce peptic ulcers in the stomach. Cabbage juice is a remedy for ulcers. It eases the inflammation in the stomach lining and speeds up the recovery process.

 

Tips to Select and Store Cabbage

To get the most out of cabbage, you must first choose the best ones from the market. Here’s how to pick good cabbages:

  • Cabbages are available all year round in supermarkets. Look for ones that are large, dense, and firm. They should have colorful leaves that are crisp and shiny without bruises, blemishes, or insect bites. They must also feel heavy for their size.
  • Tightly packed leaves at the bottom of the cabbage indicate freshness. If they are starting to separate from its stem, the cabbage is old. Don’t buy it if it seems old.
  • Shredded cabbage or which is already cut in half should be avoided as they would have lost their Vitamin C content.
  • To retain their freshness and Vitamin C level, it’s essential to keep them cold in a refrigerator.
  • Cabbages that are stored in plastic bags in a refrigerator can be stored for a week or two.
  • Cabbages with loose leaves will not last too long and are best stored in a cool dark place.
  • In case you need half a cabbage, the other half should be wrapped in a plastic bag with some water sprinkled on the cut side and refrigerated.
  • Another way to store cabbage effectively is to freeze it. First, shred the cabbage and blanch the shreds for two minutes. Filter out and freeze the shreds in an airtight container.

How to Cook Cabbage

You can include cabbage in soups, salads, and casseroles. It can be boiled, fried, stuffed, steamed or even eaten raw. Here are some healthy ways to cook cabbages:

  • A simple cabbage dish can be made by boiling some water and adding chopped cabbage to it. Add sugar and sprinkle some meat seasoning and simmer for 35 minutes.
  • Grated cabbage can be cooked in milk for 3 to 4 minutes and seasoned with pepper and salt.
  • A low-calorie cabbage dish involves cooking cabbage leaves in a mixture of mustard and cucumber juice. Steamed cabbage and other vegetables can be diced and added to it. Cook until the cabbage is a little crispy.
  • Shred red cabbage into fine pieces and add sliced apples and a bit of vinegar. Cook for 1 minute.
  • To make stuffed cabbage rolls, remove the core and stuff it with vegetables of your choice. Cook for 3 minutes until it is soft and serve with a spicy sauce.
  • For a quick and delicious dish, stir-fry sliced cabbage with ginger, garlic, chillies and a bit of soy sauce.

Are There Any Side Effects of Eating Cabbage?

Cabbages also have a few side effects like any other vegetable, some of them include:

  • Foodborne illnesses
  • Bloating
  • Goitre
  • Flatulence
  • Colic in babies

FAQs

  1. What Are the Different Varieties of Cabbage?

There are 7 varieties of cabbage – red cabbage, Choy sum, Bok choy, Savoy cabbage, Napa cabbage, Cannonball cabbage, January king cabbage.

 

2. Apply to sore joints.

You can place a leaf of cabbage on a sore joint and it will help pull out the inflammation, I have done this and felt the benefits.

 

**If Pregnant talk to your doctor about eating cabbage too often**

 

The information is provided on this website is for entertainment and general information purposes only.

While I aim to provide up-to-date information, I make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose.

You are reading of the information on this website is of your own free will and you are taking the provided information at your own risk.

The information we provide is for entertainment purposes only. I am  not providing medical, legal or other professional advice.  And will not be liable for anything you choose to do on your own. In fact I always suggest you talk to your own doctor before trying anything.

All about Knee pain part 4 of 6

 

Part 4 knees

How is knee pain diagnosed?

 

When diagnosing any knee pain, the physician will take your medical history and perform a thorough physical examination.

To help your doctor best understand your knee pain, you’ll need to provide the following information:

• A description of your knee pain (aching, tenderness, burning or swelling)

• Where the pain is located and when it occurs

• When the pain started (and if it is the result of an injury or accident)

• Anything that makes the pain worse or better

Your doctor also may order imaging tests to view the joint, which may include the following:

X-rays – An X-ray can show if there are certain problems, such as deterioration or fracture, within your knee.

MRI – In some cases, your doctors may order a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. An MRI provides significantly more detail about the soft tissues in your knee, such as the cartilage on the surface of the bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles.

CT scan – Computerized tomography scans combine X-ray views from multiple angles, creating a two- or three-dimensional, cross-sectional image. These images show “slices” of bone and soft tissue.

 

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All About Our Knees Part 3 of 6

Part 3 knee

Knee injuries can be the result of sports, falls or trauma. They typically involve the ligaments that hold two of the bones of the knee – the femur and tibia – together. Here are some of the most common types:

Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are among the most common and dreaded sports injuries. Your ACL keeps your knee from moving too far out of position. Changing directions too quickly or hyperextending the knee can tear the ACL. Women are more prone to tearing the ACL. Surgery is often necessary to repair damage to an ACL.

A stretch or tear of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is typically caused by a hit or blow to the outer knee. Pain is felt along the inner knee. Bracing and conservative treatment, such as rest and physical therapy, are usually sufficient to heal these injuries.

The meniscus is crescent-shaped cartilage between your thigh bone (femur) and lower leg bone (tibia). You have two of these cushions in each of your knees, inner (medial) and outer (lateral). The medial one is most often injured. These injuries often are caused by sudden twisting, resulting in swelling, pain and locking of the knee. Arthroscopic surgery may be necessary to remove the torn fragment when conservative treatment does not help.

All About Our Knees Part 2

Types of Pain

What are the different types of knee pain?

Knee pain has many causes. Some of the most common include:

Osteoarthritis

Arthritis is a chronic condition that causes joint inflammation. Symptoms include redness, warmth, swelling, tenderness and pain. Up to 30 percent of the population may have knee osteoarthritis, or “wear and tear” arthritis. This is the gradual breakdown of the cartilage in the knee. Also called degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis usually develops over years and often is found in patients who have had a knee infection or injury and those who are overweight.

As cartilage wears away, the bones around it can grow thicker and develop bony spurs. This can lead to increased friction between the bones and disrupted movement in your knee. This also can lead to problems with the synovium, a membrane in your knee that produces a liquid to keep your cartilage slippery. This membrane can become inflamed and make too much fluid. This results in swelling, or “water on the knee.” In the most severe cases, the knee can become deformed as the continued friction wears away the bone.

Common symptoms of osteoarthritis include pain, stiffness, tenderness, a limited range of motion and a grating sensation when you bend your knee. The pain is usually worse after activity.

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis can affect joints on both sides of the body (both knees, both hands and/or both wrists). In rheumatoid arthritis, your body’s cells attack your own tissues. While in most people symptoms develop gradually over years, they can appear rapidly. Rheumatoid arthritis affects three to five times more women than men and often presents between the ages of 20 and 50.

Rheumatoid arthritis may be related to a combination of abnormal immunity and genetic, environmental and hormonal factors. Over time, rheumatoid arthritis can cause cartilage to wear away, swelling in the synovium, and excess fluid in the knee. In later stages, bones can rub against each other.

Bursitis

Bursitis is the inflammation of any of the fluid-filled sacs (bursae) protecting the body’s joints. This is usually caused by repetitive motions or by a stress such as kneeling. Sometimes, a sudden injury can cause bursitis.

Tendonitis

The tendons – rope-like tissues connecting muscles to bone at the knee and other joints – can become painfully inflamed by repetitive and strenuous movement. Tendonitis is a common sports injury, caused by overuse of the same parts of the body. Patellar tendinitis, or “jumper’s knee,” is an inflammation or irritation of the tendon between the knee cap and the shin bone.

Baker’s cyst

A lump behind your knee could be a Baker’s cyst. A Baker’s cyst, also called a popliteal cyst, is a fluid-filled pocket that causes swelling and tightness behind the knee. Often, it is not painful. A Baker’s cyst is typically associated with arthritis or a cartilage tear, conditions that can cause your knee to produce too much fluid. The key to treatment is to find the underlying cause of the fluid accumulating in the Baker’s cyst.

Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS)

Knee pain or discomfort while walking up and down stairs, jumping or squatting may be symptoms of patellofemoral pain syndrome. This common knee problem is felt toward the front of the knee. It can cause a grinding sensation when bending or straightening your leg, and can cause your knee to occasionally buckle. Sometimes called “runner’s knee,” patellofemoral pain syndrome may be caused by a kneecap that is not aligned properly, overuse, injury, excess weight or when the cartilage in the knee cap is worn significantly.

Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis

Osteonecrosis of the knee (also known as avascular necrosis) is a painful condition that occurs when the blood supply to a section of bone in the femur (thighbone) or tibia (shinbone) is disrupted. The pain varies from no pain to severe hot pain. Like bathe feeling of being hit in knee with a hot iron or sharp stabbing lightening bolt pain. Treatment can vary depending on stage from Prp injections to Total Knee Replacement.

SPONK Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the knee comes on suddenly.