Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Life

What It Really Means to “Pace Yourself”

What It Really Means to “Pace Yourself”

We hear it all the time but what does it mean…….

Embracing flexibility instead of rigidity for those of us living with chronic joint pain.

In the study, patients reported that key components of pacing themselves included:

  • Breaking down tasks into mini tasks
  • Saying ‘no’ or learning to
  • Being kind to themselves self care is a must
  • Using rest breaks
  • Doing something each day
  • Developing a structure or plan
  • Gradually building up activities – people who run marathons don’t just run marathons: they train and pace themselves- we need to pace our self –
  • Stop feeling guilty if you need to rest
  • Respect your limits
  • Love the body you have
  • Don’t be so proud as to not get that handicap placard or license plate. Not all disabilities are visible

People chronic conditions like osteonecrosis, osteoarthritis, ra, fibromyalgia etc, We tend to feel the Zip and then the Blah: if we do too much in one day, even if they feel okay at the moment. For example, I woke up with a little or a lot more energy and without as much pain, and I try to get all tasks done in one day….. only to pay for it in pain days later. So we must learn to pace ourselves

Tip

Pacing isn’t always about avoiding doing too much. It’s also about staying out of a cycle of doing too little or nothing at all. We must keep moving. And figuring out how to stay physically active is one of ways we can promote self-care, and reduce stress as well. 

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness

How to Limit Our Joint Pain When the Seasons and Temperatures Change

I was asked about weather and joint pain so I thought I would RE-post this from October 2020.

Can you feel that storm coming in your knees? Back pain increases with a cold front? So can lots of people with arthritis. Some doctors think that …

How to Limit Our Joint Pain When the Seasons and Temperatures Change
Posted in Advocate, Arthritis, Awareness

Ways to help stop the Zoom Intruders

As an advocate for arthritis and a Facilitator to the Live Yes Connect Group and Founder of the International Support group Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis Support Int’l

I use Zoom a lot: as a person back in school I again use Zoom a lot: talking with family , friends and attending other meetings yep zoom again ! So it’s great to have tips to have a more secure meeting, because we all know there will be some clown or troubled individual- intruding in a meeting.

Here are things I do and have learned in my zoom calls to stop ZB aka Zoom Intruders

Ways to have a safe meeting.

Always always always make sure your Zoom Account is up to date. Here’s how – Sign in to Zoom desktop client. Click your profile picture then click Check for Updates. If there is a newer version, Zoom will download and install it.


Create a waiting room –

The Waiting Room is just like it sounds: It’s a virtual staging area that prevents people from joining a meeting until the host is ready. Meeting hosts can customize the Waiting Room settings to gain further control over which participants join a specific meeting and when.

When it comes to video conferencing security best practices, Waiting Rooms are extremely useful for protecting meetings that have external participants

Only have one person screen share
Stop other participants from screen sharing
Click the arrow next to “Share Screen” in the host controls at the bottom of the Zoom screen, then select “Advanced Sharing Options” and make sure the option to “Who Can Share?” is set to “Host Only”.

Lock the room once meeting starts or with in a couple minutes after it starts – If you start a meeting and everyone you expect to join has, you can lock the meeting from new participants. While the meeting is running, navigate to the bottom of the screen and click Participants. The Participants panel will open. At the bottom, choose More > Lock Meeting.

If a non welcome person comes in You can kick them out.

To kick someone out: During the call, go to the Participants pane on the right. Hover over the name of the person you want to boot and when options appear, choose Remove.
By default, an ousted guest cannot rejoin. What to do if you make a mistake? You can allow a booted party to rejoin. Enable this feature by going to the web portal and navigating to Settings > Meeting > In-Meeting (Basic). Toggle on the setting called Allow removed participants to rejoin.

Disable Someone’s Camera
Hosts can turn off any participant’s camera. If someone is being rude or inappropriate on video, or their video has some technical problem, the host can open the Participants panel and click on the video camera icon next to the person’s name.

Prevent Animated GIFs and Other Files in the Chat
In the chat area of a Zoom meeting, participants can share files, including images and animated GIFs—if you let them. If you’d rather not, then be sure to disable file transfer. It’s on by default, so you have to actively disable it.
For your own meetings, open Settings in the Zoom web app (it’s not in the desktop app). On the left side, go to Personal > Settings. Then click In Meeting (Basic). Scroll down a little farther until you see File Transfer. That’s where you can disable it.

Turn off File Transfer
This will stop jerks from uploading porn through the in-meeting text-chat function. Go to Account Management > Account Settings > Meeting > File Transfer.
The Zoom blog posting has many more tips, including a few that are for paid Zoom accounts only, such as making the meeting invitation-only and requiring attendees to log in with a password.

I know many accounts are free so there is a time limit of I think 60 minutes . But there are excellent ways to secure a meeting.

Some will always fall through the cracks but it’s an excellent way to have a more secure meeting.

Wishing you a happy pain free day 🌸

Deb

Posted in Arthritis, Chronic Pain, Pain

Not All Pain is Created Equal

Not All Pain is Created Equal

When we hear the word arthritis, we think of our grandparents talking about their joint aches. We had no idea it could happen to children and people of all ages.

There are more than 100 types of arthritis and related diseases, and not all arthritis pain is alike. It can originate in different areas of our body, triggering chemical and electrical signals that move from the area of pain or injury up to brain and back to let us know that hurt

I have a high tolerance for pain so when I am hurting, I know it’s bad. Everyone’s threshold and tolerance for pain is unique. Then, there are days I bump my hand or arm and I see stars. I just don’t understand it….

Living and coping with chronic pain can be the hardest part of living with a joint disease. It can disrupt every part of our life and many parts of your life can also affect your pain.

Facts on Pain

  • As many as 75 percent of those 65 and older report persistent pain from arthritis and other chronic conditions.
  • Almost four out of five older adults have multiple chronic conditions besides arthritis, like diabetes, heart disease and obesity. And the combination can heighten pain and discomfort.
  • Women are more likely to develop chronic pain and often feel pain more intensely than men.
  • In the United States, 23% of all adults—over 54 million people—have arthritis. About 24 million adults are limited in their activities from arthritis, and more than 1 in 4 adults with arthritis report severe joint pain

National Prevalence

  • From 2013–2015, an estimated 54.4 million US adults (22.7%) annually had ever been told by a doctor that they had some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia. Learn more about national arthritis statistics.
  •  

Throughout September, I want to help bring attention to living with chronic pain and the suffering arthritis frequently causes. Let your family and friends know it’s Pain Awareness Month and ask them to help spread the word about how important it is to find more effective treatments and a cure for all forms of joint pain and arthritis.

Most of all, make sure you take care of yourself.

Tips on taking care of yourself and living with arthritis

References

Managing a flare – Arthritis Foundation- https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/managing-pain/pain-relief-solutions/tips-for-managing-an-arthritis-flare

Exercise and kids with JA – https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/physical-activity/getting-started/best-exercises-for-children-with-ja

Arthritis , Autoimmune and Rheumatology Research Cure Arthritis https://curearthritis.org/arthritis-research

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Patient Leader, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards, WEGOHealthAwards2020

I Am A Nominee In The WEGOHealth Awards 2020

I am so honored to share that I am a nominee in the WEGOHealth Awards for Best In Show – Community and Patient Leader Hero

#WEGOHealthChat #WEGOHealthAwards #PatientLeader #Osteoarthritis #Osteonecrosis #Grateful www,ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com and  https://avascularnecrosiseducation.com

 

My WEGOHealth Profile Link    Deborah Andio WEGOHealth Profile Link

Voting will begin in July and link will be posted then to vote.

Until then if you wish to nominate me or read about WEGOHealth or take the time to nominate other amazing hardworking Advocates please go to link below

WEGOHealthAwards Vote – Review Nominees – How It Works -The Judges

 

My Nominations

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Hearing Loss, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Link-Between Hearing Loss and RA

When we think of hearing loss, you may associate it with your loved one who’s always asking you to repeat yourself, or the friend who may struggle to follow conversations.

Hearing loss is often caused by exposure to excessive noise and is even linked to the natural aging process. But did you know that hearing loss isn’t just caused by your loud job, or the blaring music at the concert ?

Along with lesser known causes of hearing loss like smoking and diabetes, a recent study found a link between hearing loss and rheumatoid arthritis.

 

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease that affects many seniors, though young people can also suffer from the disease. Around 1.5 million Americans have RA, and this number continues to rise. RA is an autoimmune disease, which means that the immune system turns against the body. Rather than protecting the body from sicknesses by warding off viral and bacterial infections, the immune system attacks the joints, causing swelling, inflammation, and pain. RA can damage cartilage and tissue around the joints, disform the joints, and even damage the bone. It becomes painful to move the affected joints, and leads to reduced mobility, and difficulty performing normal daily tasks.

Linking Hearing Loss and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Clinical trials looking at the links between hearing loss and arthritis found far higher rates of hearing loss among those with arthritis. Those with RA were more likely to have sensorineural hearing loss, hearing loss associated with the ear and not the brain. Delicate cells in the inner ear are damaged in this type of hearing loss, and once these cells are damaged, they don’t regenerate. You’ll be unable to hear certain sounds in the environment, since the cells in the ear responsible for those sounds have been destroyed.

A 2006 study found that around 43% of those with RA had hearing loss! And a study from the Mayo Clinic, reported that even though they weren’t able to detect measurably higher rates of hearing loss among those with RA, their patients with RA were far more likely to perceive that they had hearing loss.

 

How does RA Lead to Hearing Loss?

Researchers are still unclear on the how rheumatoid arthritis and hearing loss are linked. However, it’s clear that RA can attack other body systems, not just the joints, so the cells in the ear can also be affected by this disease.

Another link could be the drugs used to treat the pain that goes hand in hand with arthritis. Many studies have found that common pain killers, such as ibuprofen (Advil) and acetaminophen (Tylenol) can cause hearing loss. Even taking these pain killers two or more days per week was linked to worse hearing health, while those who took pain killers six days a week had a 24% higher risk of hearing loss than those who didn’t take pain killers. Those suffering from RA often take a lot of painkillers just to get through the day, and these drugs are known to reduce blood flow and deprive the cells in the inner ear of the oxygen and nutrients they need to survive.

Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis

While doctors can’t cure RA, they all agree that treating the disease as soon as possible is essential for good health outcomes. Treating RA stops inflammation, prevents further joint damage or deformity, and relieves pain. It also improves overall well-being by allowing for increased mobility and physical function. Treatments include medications to ease symptoms, as well as to reduce inflammation and slow joint damage.

Self-management is also important when it comes to RA, and your doctor will help you be proactive in managing the disease and maintaining your overall quality of life. Eating well, exercising often and resting, using heat pads, and learning relaxation techniques all play a role in self-management.

Treating Hearing Loss

If you’ve been struggling to hear, and think it may be linked to your RA, call your local hearing center.

May is Arthritis Awareness Month

Posted in Advocate, Arthritis, Awareness, Meditation, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain

How I Use Meditation and Palming To Help My Pain

So I have been meditating for over 18 months. It has helped me learn to quiet my mind. Focus on my breathing and start taking back some control of my pain.

It sure did pay off last week.

I fell after another bowman lost her balance her cane went sliding and she also grabbed onto me as for me to stop her fall.

That did not happen.

As with any time I am feeling pain I try to meditate the pain away.

Sometimes it works fantastically sometimes it just calms me which is also good.

Here are the steps I take to help meditate my pain away

Step 1: Stabilize your mind

Step 2: Identify the area where you feel pain.

Step 3: Focus your mind to the pain sensation in the area.

Step 4: Notice if the pain sensation changes.

Step 5: If your mind wanders, gently bring your mind back to the object of your meditation, which is a focused awareness on pain.

Mind stabilization can be achieved with mindfulness meditation, described as “a simple mental exercise, which develops mindfulness and concentration by paying attention on a chosen object (for example, taste of food or activity you wish to focus on) and holding the attention for a period of time. Mindfulness meditation does not necessarily require sitting but can be practiced while eating, walking, running, commuting, and doing other activities. This mental exercise also helps develop an ability to sustain mindfulness for prolonged time.”

Here are helpful tips for quieting an unquiet mind:

  • Meditate for only two minutes (gradually move to 3,4,5,15… minutes)
  • Use a timer to remind you of an end of a meditation session.
  • Instead of trying to stop, welcome it whatever arises.
  • If you cannot concentrate on the object of your meditation, pay attention to the thoughts and stories occurring in your mind instead.
  • If you cannot meditate while sitting, meditate while walking,hiking,running,laying down at night, eating etc….

Say to your self

I am

Breathe in I breathe out am – do this a few times then add I am pain free, I am healing, I am well.

When I’m finished doing this for a few minutes at the end I rub my hands together get them warm and gently place the palms of my hands on my eyes. It feels so good. You can then rub your head.

Feeling the energy in your body going to help your pain.

Palming helps the eyes

Palming: Palming, which was originally invented by Tibetan yogis, is done in darkness with the palms cupping the eyes. Palming soothes the optic nerve, which is often irritated. Sit in a darkened room with your elbows leaning on a table. Relax your back and shoulders, rub your hands together vigorously to warm them, then place your palms over your eyes. Don’t press the eye sockets and don’t lean on the cheekbones. Visualize total blackness, the most relaxing color for the brain, and breathe deeply. Let the blackness permeate everything: your eyes, your whole body, the room you sit in, the city, the state, the continent, the planet, the stars, the universe.

You may see all kinds of lights, which is an indication of irritation in the optic nerve. In fact, you may not see total darkness until you have completed several palming sessions. Palm for as long as is comfortable.

Meditation and Palming

I find this not just relaxing but I feel centered , calm , content and I have less pain when I do this 2x a day, for just 10 minutes.

Here are the links I used and still use sometimes

I am – guided meditation by Wayne Dyer https://youtu.be/BoE4QjMiHys

Palming for relaxing and helping eyes

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Bone and Joint Health, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Osteoporosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Joint Pain and Our Government

It’s that damn pain that may creep up slowly on you with a dull, discomfort in one or several of your joints.

Or it might be like a raging inferno it like a thief in the night, to steal your joy or try to…. the pain comes on suddenly without any warning, bringing on that stabbing intensity as sharp as a knife.

The pain might come and go, or it may last hours, days, weeks…. This pain is arthritis, and it’s likely you know someone living with it or you may be living with it yourself.

It is not just a grandparents issue.

I have been living with arthritis for over 20 years, I think I was 35-36 when I was diagnosed with osteoarthritis, only years later to be diagnosed also with osteonecrosis in 2014 and spondylolisthesis for over 5 years. It can really be exhausting from always dealing with some sort of pain.

Arthritis can be crippling. Some people even need a stair-lift just so they can move freely around their house as they are in too much pain to walk up and down the stairs. Some end up in a wheelchair or using a walker.

Did you know that arthritis impacts more than 50 million adults and 300,000 children in the U.S. According to The Arthritis Foundation, the number of people affected by the condition is expected to increase to 65-68 million by 2030.

More research is needed to combat this health crisis, a disease and source of chronic pain for so many people that it is often marginalized by misinformed attitudes, old wise tales, and social stigma.

Our government officials are not helping us either. They are trying to tell doctors what to prescribe and how much and limit them on treating their patients.

I wish the government would stay out of my health and my doctors business.

My doctor went to school many years and I don’t want some politician giving me medical advice when they have no idea what I live with on a daily basis.Nor have they went to school to become a doctor either.

Many like myself cannot take NSAIDs and when you have osteonecrosis,you really don’t want to constantly be using steroids.

I avoid steroids at all costs.

Arthritis includes more than 100 different types of joint disease and related conditions. I have written previously about osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and juvenile arthritis.

In the most basic terms, arthritis is inflammation of the joints that causes swelling, stiffness, reduced range of motion, and pain that can become chronic. It can affect your knees,ankles and toes, back, hip, fingers, wrists, elbows, shoulders, or neck.

Did you know that the heart, eyes, lungs, kidneys and skin can sometimes also be effected?

Arthritis can also affect your muscles, resulting in muscle weakness or fatigue.

The extra weight from obesity can strain your joints if you are not eating well and exercising regularly.

Your bones are like a bridge and like with any other bridge it has a weight limit before it starts to damage the bridge.

So we have to try to keep moving remove excess weight to keep out bridge aka our bones and joints strong and able to support us.

So many people often dismiss arthritis as a condition of older adulthood, but arthritis can strike any age, gender or race, and it is the leading cause of disability in the United States.

Chronic pain sufferers fear they could become casualties in the war on Ohio’s opioid overdose epidemic.

Because it seems like those who suffer in pain real chronic pain are the only ones paying the price.

img_7886

 

What they ( our elected officials ) don’t understand is responsible people are the ones suffering, not the drug addicts who use heroin and get many of their drugs illegally.

In August 2019 Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said that evidence recently made public makes clear that drugmakers were responsible for the deadly opioid crisis and that they had lied about the addictiveness of their painkillers.

I’m sorry but ya know I don’t buy that crap at all.

When will people actually learn to take responsibility for their own poor choices?

There has been people using and abusing drugs for decades, longer….

lThey are looking to get high, that’s a big difference than someone needing a pain pill now and then to function and have joint mobility and the pain managed.

I get so frustrated at our government always telling patients whats good for them.

And telling doctors how to do their job.

I don’t want my car mechanic telling my dentist how to clean my teeth.

And I don’t want my elected officials telling my doctor what to do.

Why not ban alcohol ?

Why not ban cigarettes

That kills a lot more people and well we know how many abuse that.

Probably because they get a tax on that , so that’s ok.

Just like marijuana, years ago you went to prison , now because the state can make a buck its ok as long as its medical.

According to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey, in 2013, more than half of the US adult population drank alcohol in the past 30 days. About 17% of the adult population reported binge drinking, and 6% reported heavy drinking.

According to the ARDI application, during 2006–2010, excessive alcohol use was responsible for an annual average of  88,000 deaths, including 1 in 10 deaths among working-age adults aged 20 to 64 years, and 2.5 million years of potential life lost.  More than half of these deaths and three-quarters of the years of potential life lost were due to binge drinking.  https://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/data-stats.htm

 

The Republican Governor of Ohio urged the companies to move quickly to settle pending lawsuits seeking to hold them accountable for the epidemic in light of troves of new documents made public because of those suits. And who gets the money from these lawsuits? Certainly not the people that were or are addicted , or their families……no it’s the state.

 

Get stricter on drunk driving laws https://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/impaired_driving/states-data-tables.html

 

But for gosh sakes stop punishing people responsible people who just are trying to live dealing with their chronic pain. To function, to get to work, to grocery shop to live.

Please get involved write or call your elected officials : tell them help those living with chronic pain not make them suffer.

They are not drug addicts they are people like you and me and your neighbor and like your grandparent, mother, uncle son or daughter suffering with chronic pain.

https://www.usa.gov/elected-officials

 

 

The most 5 common types of arthritis are Osteoarthritis, Fibromyalgia, Gout, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than a third of adults who have arthritis report it limits their leisure and work activities. 25% of them state it also causes severe pain (7+ on the 0 to 10 point pain scale).

Children and teens get a type of arthritis called juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). “Juvenile” means young (16 yrs of age or younger) and “idiopathic” means the cause is not known. JIA is also sometimes called juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA).

Many people confuse osteoporosis and different types of arthritis.

  • Arthritis: A general term for conditions that affect the joints and surrounding tissues. Joints are places in the body where bones come together, such as the knees, wrists, fingers, toes, and hips. The two most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Osteoporosis: A condition in which the bones become less dense and more likely to fracture. In osteoporosis, there is a loss of bone tissue that leaves bones less dense and more likely to fracture. It can result in a loss of height, severe back pain, and change in posture. Osteoporosis can impair a person’s ability to walk and can cause prolonged or permanent disability – Difference Between Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

References

Arthritis Foundation

AF types of arthritis

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis

What your eating maybe worsening your Osteoarthritis

Your eating what?

Before you take one more bite of that fast food lunch or dinner consider how it affects your osteoarthritis.

Did you know that research shows that diets high in saturated fat – found in red meat, butter, cheese, lard and processed foods – can weaken knee cartilage, making it more prone to damage.

Yep so start eating more plants

There was a study in 2017 published in Arthritis Care & Research, researchers followed more than 2,000 patients with OA for up to four years, checking disease progression  and diet at yearly intervals. Participants who ate the most fat, especially the saturated kind, showed increasing joint damage, whereas those who ate healthy fats like olive oil and avocados had little disease progression.

Another recent animal study showed that it even may harm the underlying bone, according to Yin Xiao, PhD, a professor at Queensland University of Technology in Australia and lead author of a 2017 study that looked at the effect of diet on OA.

“Our findings suggest that it’s not wear and tear but diet that has a lot to do with the onset of osteoarthritis,” he says.

Blame It On Inflammation

Fat’s not the only culprit, though. Sugar, refined carbs, red meat, processed food and corn and soybean oils can spark inflammation, too. Barry Sears, PhD, a long-time researcher in inflammatory nutrition, says eating them is “like throwing a match into a vat of gasoline.”

These foods also tend to pack on pounds, putting extra pressure on stressed joints. To make matters worse, body fat, especially the kind that collects around your belly, makes its own inflammatory proteins, perpetuating the cycle of inflammation even after you’ve sworn off junk food forever.

Fighting Back

The solution is to change the way you eat. Switching to an anti-inflammatory or Mediterranean-style diet can help you lose weight and significantly improve your joint, heart and  brain health without sacrificing good taste.

An anti-inflammatory diet is heavy on fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and healthy fats like olive oil, avocados and nuts. Poultry’s allowed  now and then and you can have one glass of red wine or beer a day. Off the menu, as you might expect, are sugar, red meat, and processed foods.

What sets this way of eating apart is that it actively fights inflammation, experts say.

“There are a variety of foods in the Mediterranean diet that are high in fiber, beta carotene, magnesium and omega 3s, all of which have been found to reduce inflammatory markers in human studies,” explains Michelle Babb, MS, RD, a Seattle-based nutrition educator.

“I’ve had [arthritis] patients who have been able to discontinue the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a result of transitioning to a Mediterranean diet. Some even report a noticeable difference in pain in the first week.”

Even so, changing the way you eat can be daunting.

“Don’t expect your diet to change overnight,” advises Sotiria Everett, EdD, RD, an assistant professor at Stonybrook University Medical Center in New York. “Start by looking at what you’re eating now (a food diary is a great way to do this) and identifying areas where you can improve.”

But Babb doesn’t see a problem. Her patients “really enjoy this food plan and don’t feel it’s a hardship to follow it,” she says.

She admits it takes more work and advance planning than the drive-through and recommends prepping some food for the week in advance.

I personally can agree with this as when I stopped eating so much red meat and cut out sugar and most processed junk I felt much better .

And when I eat things that are not as healthy as they should be I feel more pain.

So try a plant based diet or as they suggest Mediterranean

You will be so glad you did.

This taken from article Arthritis Foundation Blog

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness

May – Arthritis Awareness Month

I have had OA in knees over 14 years.

The clicking popping sounds , the feeling of stiffness like the tin man on the wizard of oz is normal especially when it’s rainy.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a form of degenerative joint pain caused by wear and tear on your joints. As you age, the cartilage that cushions your joints starts to wear down, causing the bones to rub together. The bone-on-bone action leads to inflammation of the joints.

Almost 300,000 babies and children have arthritis or a rheumatic condition.

The most common type of arthritis is osteoarthritis, which affects an estimated 54 million Americans.

Number of people expected to have doctor-diagnosed arthritis by the year 2040: more than 78 million.

People in the early stages of osteoarthritis may notice that moving the affected areas of their bodies is not as easy as it once was. Joint stiffness and pain can contribute to loss of flexibility, also called loss of range of motion.

Range of motion is the extent to which you can move your joints in their normal patterns. For example, fully bending and extending your knee is its range of motion.

If you have arthritis, you might not be able to bend your knee as far. Loss of flexibility is usually a very gradual process.

There’s no cure for osteoarthritis (OA) yet, but there are several treatment options and lifestyle changes that can relieve your symptoms. A combination of treatments and lifestyle changes can help:

  • alleviate symptoms
  • improve quality of life
  • slow progression of the disease

The right types of exercise can help with OA. Exercise may improve pain and stiffness and even prevent further damage to your joints. The stronger the muscles around your knee are, the better they can absorb the shock placed on the knee when you move.

Exercise can also help you lose weight, put less stress on the knees, and ease pain. Your doctor or physical therapist can recommend specific exercises based on your needs.

These may include strengthening exercises for your muscles and stretching and range-of-motion exercises for stiffness. Aerobic activity is recommended for those who need to lose weight.

Over-the-counter (OTC) medications like acetaminophen (Tylenol) and NSAIDs (ibuprofen, naproxen, aspirin) can help alleviate some of the pain and inflammation. Your doctor may also prescribe stronger medications.

Use caution, even when taking OTC medications. They can interact with other medications you’re taking. Always speak to your doctor before taking new medications.

Topical medications are also available. These creams and gels contain active ingredients that include: 

  • salicylate
  • menthol
  • capsaicin

Using these products may relieve the pain and inflammation associated with OA because of their heating and cooling effects on the skin.

Heat Over Ice

Many swear by ice ….. not me

I prefer heat… I also have osteonecrosis in Rt knee and I love love love thermacare heat wraps.

I personally found Heat helps my pain and mobility where as cold seems to make me hurt more.

Viscosupplementation works differently. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is injected into the knee joint. HA is a naturally present part of joint fluid. It lubricates the joints and helps them move freely. Most people with OA don’t have enough HA in their joint fluid.

By injecting HA into the joint, the knee benefits from extra lubrication. It decreases friction in the joint and improves the joint’s ability to absorb shock. This means less pain when you move.

Viscosupplementation has been found to provide relief to approximately 50 percent of people with OA of the knee. However, the newest guidelines from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) doesn’t recommend this for OA of the knee.

I personally hate cortisone injections. They cause me more pain and I get a reaction that makes me hurt worse.

Pulse it can lead to faster break down of cartilage and Osteonecrosis.

In the end we have to do and try what we feel may help.

Just know there are options

Prp Injections Platelet Rich Plasma

PRP

aaos treatment of osteoarthritis

I am not a paid endorser for any product mentioned.
Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Bone and Joint Health, Bone Health, Grateful, Inflammation, Knee, Weather, Weather and Joint Pain

Bombogenesis and Joint Pain

I’ve heard a lot about Bombogenesis, it’s a popular term used by meteorologists, occurs when a midlatitude cyclone rapidly intensifies, dropping at least 24 millibars over 24 hours. A millibar measures atmospheric pressure.

Remember your great-aunt used to to say she “feels” a storm coming on, she was probably predicting the weather with some accuracy. You probably laughed.

But now you know exactly what she meant.

Barometric pressure is the weight of the atmosphere that surrounds us. Barometric pressure often drops before bad weather.

Lower air pressure pushes less against the body, allowing tissues to expand. Expanded tissues can put pressure on joints and cause pain.

Arthritis and joint pain affects everything within the joint, including the lining and ligaments.

All of those tissues have nerve endings that can feel changes in the weather, which may result in tightness, stiffness, and some discomfort.

So if you plan to be active in cold weather or high altitude, warm up first with stretching exercises and wear appropriate clothing

The Arthritis Foundation published a study from Tufts University in 2007 that found that every 10-degree drop in temperature corresponded with an incremental increase in arthritis pain. In addition, low temperatures, low barometric pressure and precipitation can increase pain. Researchers are not sure why weather changes cause pain, but suspect that certain atmospheric conditions increase swelling in the joint.

As for weather-related pain, it hurts, but it’s only temporary. Your joints should return to normal as soon as the barometric pressure increases and the temperature goes up. Your great aunt may be able to predict calm weather, too, as she feels less joint pain.

Song of The Day : California Dreaming Mamas And Papas

Resource Link

https://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/tools-resources/weather/

Posted in Arthritis, Bone Health, osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Facts About Arthritis

View or download the Arthritis Foundation’s “Arthritis by the Numbers” book

Arthritis Disability

Arthritis is the leading cause of disability among adults in the U.S.

Arthritis Prevalence

  • By conservative estimates, about 54 million adults have doctor-diagnosed arthritis.
  • Almost 300,000 babies and children have arthritis or a rheumatic condition.
  • The most common type of arthritis is osteoarthritis, which affects an estimated 31 million Americans.
  • Number of people expected to have doctor-diagnosed arthritis by the year 2040: more than 78 million.

Who Gets Arthritis

Doctor-diagnosed arthritis is more common in women (26 percent) than in men (18 percent). In some types, such as rheumatoid arthritis, women far outnumber men.

Economic Cost of Arthritis

Almost two-thirds of adults in the U.S. with arthritis are of working age (18-64 years).

Arthritis and other non-traumatic joint disorders are among the five most costly conditions among adults 18 and older.

Co-morbidities

Arthritis is much more common among people who have other chronic conditions.

  • 49 percent of adults with heart disease have arthritis.
  • 47 percent of adults with diabetes have arthritis.
  • 31 percent of adults who are obese have arthritis

arthritis

I am a proud New Patient Leader and representative for the Arthritis Foundation.

I will be raising awareness and setting up local meetings in my hometown so we can have a voice and spread awareness locally

Posted in Arthritis, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis, Pain, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Understanding The Mechanisms of Pain

It’s safe to say most of us are not really fans of pain. However it is one of the body’s most important ways for communication. Imagine, for instance, what would happen if you felt nothing when you put your hand in hot water, or burned your neck with a curling iron , or hit your thumb with a hammer and never felt that pain signal.

Pain is one way the body tells you something’s wrong and needs attention.

But pain whether it comes from a burn, a broken bone, surgery, joint replacement or a long-term illness is also an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience.

It has multiple causes, and people respond to it in multiple and individual ways. The pain that you push your way through might be incapacitating to someone else. Pain can make us mentally exhausted and sad if we experience it for to long.

Acute Pain and Chronic Pain

There are several ways to categorize pain. One is to separate it into acute pain and chronic pain.

Acute pain typically comes on suddenly and has a limited duration. It’s frequently caused by damage to tissue such as bone, skin, muscle, or organs, and the onset is often accompanied by anxiety or emotional distress.

Chronic pain lasts longer than acute pain and is generally somewhat resistant to medical treatment. It’s usually associated with a long-term illness, such as osteoarthritis. In some cases, such as with fibromyalgia, it’s one of the defining characteristic of the disease. Chronic pain can be the result of damaged tissue, but very often is attributable to nerve damage.

Just as there are different types of arthritis, there are also different types of pain. The pain you experience can come from various areas of the musculoskeletal system and involve different types of information processing. To learn more about the basics of the nervous system and pain.

Nociceptive Pain

What a odd word I never heard of this word until I was doing research on pain.

This is the normal mechanism that the body uses to process pain day to day. Nociceptive pain occurs when tiny nerves (nociceptors) that run on the surface of organs, muscles, joints and throughout the body are stimulated. These messages are carried by nerves to the brain. For example, when you bang your elbow, you feel nociceptive pain.

Mechanical Pain. Nociceptive pain that happens with stretch or pressure in and around joints is called mechanical pain. Osteoarthritis, low back disorders and tendinitis are common examples of mechanical pain.

Inflammatory Pain. Inflammation is an essential process that helps the body respond to and heal an injury. But it also activates nerves and causes pain. When joints are inflamed, damage to bone, muscles and cartilage (the slick surface between bones of the joints) can occur. Examples of inflammatory arthritis are rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, lupus, gout and ankylosing spondylitis.

Neuropathic pain happens when there’s too much or persistent pressure on nerves or they are damaged. It’s often described as burning, tingling, shooting, stinging or as “pins and needles.” Some people may describe a stabbing, piercing, cutting or drilling pain. An example of this type of pain is sciatic pain due to irritation of the sciatic nerve by a disc or bone spur. The pain starts at an area of the spine in the lower back and can run across the hip and buttock and down the leg.

 

Centralized pain was first used to describe pain that happens when the central nervous system (brain, brainstem, spinal cord) is damaged. It now is used to describe any pain that happens when the central nervous system doesn’t work properly and amplifies or increases the volume of pain. Other terms used to describe this condition include “central sensitization,” “central amplification” and “central pain syndrome.” Several common conditions, such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and temporomandibular joint disorder are examples. Arthritis joint pain can also become centralized in some people, especially if it is long-lasting.

Psychogenic pain is an older term for what happens when emotions cause pain in the body, make existing pain worse or make it last longer. As doctors learn more about how the central nervous system works, fewer types of pain are put in this category. For example, fibromyalgia was once considered psychogenic, but new discoveries have shown problems with pain processing in fibromyalgia. Headache, muscle pain and low back pain are commonly influenced by your emotions.

Wishing you a pain free day

Deb

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Pain

World Arthritis Day!

Today October 12, is World Arthritis Day!

Throughout the day you will see facts and info on arthritis and pain. There are over 100 forms of arthritis.

World Arthritis Day is a special day that unifies people of all ages, races, and genders to raise awareness of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases

Approximately 350 million people worldwide have arthritis. Nearly 54 million persons in the United States are affected by arthritis, including over a quarter million children! More than 21 million Americans have osteoarthritis. Approximately 2.1 million Americans suffer from rheumatoid arthritis.

Awareness
Arthritis is the nation’s number one cause of disability, affecting 1 in 4 adults, impacting the economy and causing daily struggles for the many people affected with arthritis.

Economically, over 156 billion dollars annually are lost in wages as well as medical expenses. Surgeries like knee, hip, and other joint replacements generate more and more medical expenses. In 2011 alone, there were 757,000 knee replacements and 512,000 hip replacements!

Arthritis affects our troops and veterans significantly. It is the leading reason for medical discharge from service in the military, and one in three military service members are diagnosed with arthritis, compared to one in five civilians. Members of the military over 40 are twice as likely as civilians to have arthritis. They would be diagnosed two years after a blast injury, while a non-military service member would be diagnosed about ten years later.

The risk of arthritis is increased with the affliction of other chronic conditions. For example, 49 percent of adults with heart disease have arthritis, and one third of arthritic people have anxiety or depression. Other conditions like diabetes, high blood-pressure, and obesity raise the chance of arthritis.

Daily life is impacted as well. Many adults have significant physical limitations: one in 9 adults report trouble climbing stairs, and one in 22 have trouble grasping. People with arthritis are less likely to be physically active than those not affected, although physical activity is effective to relieve pain and can improve function for those with arthritis.

What You Can Do
Today, help us spread awareness about arthritis and the impact it has on families, friends and loved ones. On #WorldArthritisDay, celebrate those with arthritis for their strength and determination.

Share your stories on social media, tag us so we can see your post, and use the hashtag

#CureArthritis #Pain

#Arthritis 

See my posts also on my fb awareness page  Awareness for Avascular Necrosis & Other Conditions of The Bone and Joints

WAD