Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Chronic Pain, Clinical Trials, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Hashimoto, Hypothyroidism, Life, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, SPONK, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Support Group, Hope, The Mighty, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards, wellness

WEGOHealth Awards and How to Nominate Others

I’m honored to say I’ve been nominated for the #WEGOHealthAwards! These awards seek to recognize Patient Leaders who are making an impact with their advocacy. Learn more – nominate today.

Here’s how you can also nominate others who educate, advocate and make a difference!

Click link below

WEGOHealth Awards and Nomination Info

WEGOHealth Awards Link To Information

Think about the advocates and influencers you see leading Facebook groups, blogging about their health journey, speaking up and giving insights to healthcare companies, presenting on national stages, and running Twitter chats.

Patient Leaders have started non-profits, published podcast episodes, and authored books – there is no shortage of Patient Leaders’ contributions to the world, so let’s recognize as many of them as we can for their talents, contributions, and commitment.

Feel free to add their names and web info also in my comment section! And they can get some recognition here to !

Have a Great Day Everyone

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Cancer, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Disclaimer, Ease your Stress, Energy, Happiness, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, Pain, Sleep Better, Thoughts, Uncategorized

Relax and Help Pain & Anxiety Through Various Techniques

I used to be stressed all the time. Especially when trying to manage life with one or two chronic conditions.

Now it’s occasional stress and pain all depends…..

But I have found some relief and I believe it’s because I have learned to relax using a variety of methods. My favorite is breathing 4-7-8 I read about this from Dr Andrew Weil .

This is followed by the five-step procedure listed below:

1 Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound.

2 Close your mouth and inhale quietly through your nose to a mental count of four.

3 Hold your breath for a count of seven.

4 Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound to a count of eight.

5 This is one breath. Now inhale again and repeat the cycle three more times for a total of four breaths.

Dr Andrew Weil emphasizes the most important part of this process is holding your breath for eight seconds. This is because keeping the breath in will allow oxygen to fill your lungs and then circulate throughout the body. It is this that produces a relaxing effect in the body.

I personally find it relaxing and you can use it anytime you feel stress and or anxiety.

I’ve tried a few things and this is the topic for today.

Daily I use

I use breathing 4-7-8i

I also am grateful for everything

Weekly

EFT Tapping (more about that below)

I also practice mindful meditation a few days a week when I walk especially.

I want to share with you ways that helped me, and maybe they can help you.

Make sure you get the ok from your doctor before starting anything new.

Relaxation Techniques
Using the Relaxation Response to Relieve Stress

For many of us, relaxation means zoning out in front of the TV at the end of a stressful day. But this does little to reduce the damaging effects of stress that add to disease and poor health. To effectively combat stress, we need to activate our body’s natural relaxation response.

You can do this by learning and practicing relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation, rhythmic exercise, and yoga.

Adding one or all of these activities into your life can help really reduce your everyday stress, and it will boost your mood, and improve your mental focus and physical health.

What is the relaxation response?
When stress overwhelms your nervous system, your body is flooded with chemicals that prepare you for “fight or flight.

Your stress response can be lifesaving in emergency situations where you need to act quickly. But when it’s constantly activated by the stresses of everyday life, it can wear your body down and take a toll on your-health both physical and emotional.

I was at my Naturopath’s a few months ago and she did what she called tapping. I felt this sense of peace and relief, like a huge weight was lifted from my shoulder.

If you’re like me and many other people, you feel trapped, whether it’s due to daily stress , work or school stress, family stress , stress that comes with having a chronic condition etc…we all can get caught in this cycle. The Stress Cycle

You’re tired of feeling sad, depressed, anxious, discontent, and unwell. You’re sick of the expensive and ineffective treatments. You’re fed up with relinquishing the power over your health and happiness to doctors.

You want to be your best, living a life that is filled with peacefulness, joy, and fulfillment, from day to day and moment to moment.

Tapping

Meditation

Yoga

Deep Breathing

These can all help I will post some links below to help you learn more.

No one can avoid all stress, but you can learn to how to counteract its detrimental effects in the body mind and spirit.

The relaxation response puts the brakes on stress and brings your body and mind back into a state of equilibrium.

When the relaxation response is activated, your:
heart rate slows down
breathing becomes slower and deeper
blood pressure drops or stabilizes
muscles relax
blood flow to the brain increases

In addition to its calming physical effects, the relaxation response also increases energy and focus, combats illness, relieves aches and pains, heightens problem-solving abilities, and boosts motivation and productivity. Best of all, anyone can reap these benefits with regular practice.

There is no single relaxation technique that is best for everyone. The right relaxation technique is the one that resonates with you, fits your lifestyle, and is able to focus your mind and interrupt your everyday thoughts to elicit the relaxation response.

You may even find that alternating or combining different techniques provide the best results.
How you react to stress may also influence the relaxation technique that works best for you:

The “fight” response. If you tend to become angry, agitated, or keyed up under stress, you may respond best to stress relief activities that quiet you down, such as meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, deep breathing, or guided imagery.

The “flight” response. If you tend to become depressed, withdrawn, or spaced out under stress, you may respond best to stress relief activities that areenergize your nervous system, such as rhythmic exercise, massage, mindfulness, or power yoga.

The immobilization response. If you’ve experienced some type of trauma and tend to “freeze” or become “stuck” under stress, your challenge is to first rouse your nervous system to a fight or flight response (above) so you can employ the applicable stress relief techniques. To do this, choose physical activity that engages both your arms and legs, such as running, dancing, or tai chi, and perform it mindfully, focusing on the sensations in your limbs as you move.

Deep breathing
With its focus on full, cleansing breaths, deep breathing is a simple yet powerful relaxation technique. It’s easy to learn, can be practiced almost anywhere, and provides a quick way to get your stress levels in check. Deep breathing is the cornerstone of many other relaxation practices, too, and can be combined with other relaxing elements such as aromatherapy and music. All you really need is a few minutes and a place to stretch out.

How to practice deep breathing

The key to deep breathing is to breathe deeply from the abdomen, getting as much fresh air as possible in your lungs. When you take deep breaths from the abdomen, rather than shallow breaths from your upper chest, you inhale more oxygen. The more oxygen you get, the less tense, short of breath, and anxious you feel.
Sit comfortably with your back straight. Put one hand on your chest and the other on your stomach.
Breathe in through your nose. The hand on your stomach should rise. The hand on your chest should move very little.
Exhale through your mouth, pushing out as much air as you can while contracting your abdominal muscles. The hand on your stomach should move in as you exhale, but your other hand should move very little.
Continue to breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth. Try to inhale enough so that your lower abdomen rises and falls. Count slowly as you exhale.
If you find it difficult breathing from your abdomen while sitting up, try lying down. Put a small book on your stomach, and breathe so that the book rises as you inhale and falls as you exhale.

Mindfulness meditation
Rather than worrying about the future or dwelling on the past, mindfulness meditation switches the focus to what’s happening right now, enabling you to be fully engaged in the present moment.

By focusing your attention on a single repetitive action, such as your breathing, other forms of mindfulness meditation encourage you to follow and then release internal thoughts or sensations. Mindfulness can also be applied to activities such as walking, exercising, or eating.
A basic mindfulness exercise:
1. Sit on a straight-backed chair or cross-legged on the floor.
2. Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling.
3. Once you’ve narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations, and thoughts.
4. Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.

Rhythmic movement and mindful exercise
The idea of exercising may not sound particularly soothing, but rhythmic exercise that gets you into a flow of repetitive movement can be very relaxing. Examples include:
Running
Walking
Swimming
Dancing
Rowing
Climbing
For maximum stress relief, add mindfulness to your workout
While simply engaging in rhythmic exercise will help you relieve stress, if you add a mindfulness component on top, you’ll get even more benefit.
As with meditation, mindful exercise requires being fully engaged in the present moment—paying attention to how your body feels right now, rather than your daily worries or concerns. In order to “turn off” your thoughts, focus on the sensations in your limbs and how your breathing complements your movement.
If you’re walking or running, for example, focus on the sensation of your feet touching the ground, the rhythm of your breath, and the feeling of the wind against your face. If your mind wanders to other thoughts, gently return to focusing on your breathing and movement.
Visualization
Visualization, or guided imagery, is a variation on traditional meditation that involves imagining a scene in which you feel at peace, free to let go of all tension and anxiety. Choose whatever setting is most calming to you, whether it’s a tropical beach, a favorite childhood spot, or a quiet wooded glen.
You can practice visualization on your own or with a therapist (or an audio recording of a therapist) guiding you through the imagery. You can also choose to do your visualization in silence or use listening aids, such as soothing music or a sound machine or recording that matches your chosen setting—the sound of ocean waves if you’ve chosen a beach, for example.
Practicing visualization
Close your eyes and imagine your restful place. Picture it as vividly as you can—everything you can see, hear, smell, taste, and feel.

Just “looking” at it like you would a photograph is not enough. Visualization works best if you incorporate as many sensory details as possible.
For example, if you are thinking about a dock on a quiet lake:
See the rise or set
Hear the birds singing
Smell the pine trees
Feel the cool water on your bare feet
Taste the fresh, clean air
Enjoy the feeling of your worries drifting away as you slowly explore your restful place. When you are ready, gently open your eyes and come back to the present.
Don’t worry if you sometimes zone out or lose track of where you are during a visualization session. This is normal. You may also experience feelings of heaviness in your limbs, muscle twitches, or yawning. Again, these are normal responses.
Yoga and tai chi
Yoga involves a series of both moving and stationary poses, combined with deep breathing. As well as reducing anxiety and stress, yoga can also improve flexibility, strength, balance, and stamina. Since injuries can happen when yoga is practiced incorrectly, it’s best to learn by attending group classes, hiring a private teacher, or at least following video instructions. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others, tailoring your practice as you see fit.

If you’re unsure whether a specific yoga class is appropriate for stress relief, call the studio or ask the teacher.
Tai chi
If you’ve seen a group of people in the park slowly moving in synch, you’ve probably witnessed tai chi. Tai chi is a self-paced, non-competitive series of slow, flowing body movements. By focusing your mind on the movements and your breathing, you keep your attention on the present, which clears the mind and leads to a relaxed state.
Tai chi is a safe, low-impact option for people of all ages and fitness levels, including older adults and those recovering from injuries. As with yoga, it’s best learned in a class or from a private instructor. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others.
Self-massage
You’re probably already aware how much a professional massage at a spa or health club can help reduce stress, relieve pain, and ease muscle tension. What you may not be aware of is that you can experience many of the same benefits at home or work by practicing self-massage—or trading massages with a loved one.
Try taking a few minutes to massage yourself at your desk between tasks, on the couch at the end of a hectic day, or in bed to help you unwind before sleep. To enhance relaxation, you can use aromatic oil, scented lotion, or combine self-message with mindfulness or deep breathing techniques.

Start a regular relaxation practice
Learning the basics of these relaxation techniques takes regular practice to truly harness their stress-relieving power.

Most stress experts recommend setting aside at least 10 to 20 minutes a day for your relaxation practice I mean we surely can find 10 minutes….If you’d like to maximize the benefits, work toward 30 minutes to an hour…I am still working on this myself. I’m good for 15 minutes.

Tips for making relaxation techniques part of your life
Set aside time in your daily schedule. If possible, schedule a set time once or twice a day for your practice.

If your schedule is already packed, remember that many relaxation techniques can be practiced while you’re doing other things.

Try meditating while commuting on the bus or train, taking a yoga or tai chi break at lunchtime, or practicing mindful walking while exercising your dog.

Just don’t practice this stuff when you’re sleepy. These techniques are so relaxing that they can make you very sleepy I have fallen asleep many times when learning to meditate or use sounds to help me relax.

However, you will get the most benefit if you practice when you’re fully alert.

Expect ups and downs. Don’t be discouraged if you skip a few days or even a few weeks. Just keep trying.

If you exercise, improve the relaxation benefits by adopting mindfulness, try focusing your attention on your body. If you’re resistance training, for example, focus on coordinating your breathing with your movements and pay attention to how your body feels.

Now tapping this provides relief from chronic pain, emotional problems, disorders, addictions, phobias, post traumatic stress disorder, and physical diseases. I read Tapping is newly set to revolutionize the field of health and wellness, the healing concepts that it’s based upon have been in practice in Eastern medicine for over 5,000 years.

Like acupuncture and acupressure, Tapping is a set of techniques which utilize the body’s energy meridian points. You can stimulate these meridian points by tapping on them with your fingertips – literally tapping into your body’s own energy and healing power.

The basic technique requires you to focus on the negative emotion at hand: a fear or anxiety, a bad memory, an unresolved problem, or anything that’s bothering you. While maintaining your mental focus on this issue, use your fingertips to tap 5-7 times each on 12 of the body’s meridian points.

Tapping on these meridian points – while concentrating on accepting and resolving the negative emotion – will access your body’s energy, restoring it to a balanced state.

You may be wondering about these meridians.

Put simply, energy circulates through your body along a specific network of channels. You can tap into this energy at any point along the system.

This concept comes from the doctrines of traditional Chinese medicine, which referred to the body’s energy as “ch’i.” In ancient times, the Chinese discovered 100 meridian points. They also discovered that by stimulating these meridian points, they could heal.

Call it energy, call it the Source, call it life force, call it ch’i… Whatever you want to call it, it works.

In some ways, Tapping is similar to acupuncture.

Like Tapping, acupuncture achieves healing through stimulating the body’s meridians and energy flow.

However, unlike Tapping, acupuncture involves needles! “No needles” is definitely one of the advantages of Tapping.

Here is a video of how to begin tapping to ease pain another video is to help anxiety

For Pain Relief. https://youtu.be/5hYE0Wt4Sxs,

https://youtu.be/tQRQn1NpkzA ,

Tapping PainRelief

Pain relief Tap version 2

All About EFT Tapping https://youtu.be/ZfZBHWSbrsg

Tapping helps to heal-many parts of your life TEDx

TEDx Tapping https://youtu.be/ZfZBHWSbrsg

Some other links for meditation

Meditation For Pain https://youtu.be/r3qBlVfPzXo

Tibetan Sounds Meditation https://youtu.be/RgqxZU6_qOY

Help chronic pain and disease https://youtu.be/gaY4m00wXpw

Yoga for beginners with disabilities Yoga if disabled https://youtu.be/tyeMFy9KkTY

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Energy, exercise, Factor V Leiden, Food Is Thy Medicine, Heart Disease, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Positivity, SONK, StopTheClot, Thoughts, Uncategorized, Vision, Weather, WegoHealth, Winter, Women

1 year ago I decided to take my health back

Happy Anniversary To My Health….

I was always pretty healthy ….until I wasn’t.

I gained weight , injured my knee gained more weight was diagnosed with one thing after another and it was really exhausting.

First osteoarthritis and hypothyroidism at age 45

They torn meniscus age 51

Then thanks to the meniscus tear Osteonecrosis set in my knee….

Then she 53 diagnosed officially with spondylolisthesis and a bilateral pars fracture

I had the spondylolisthesis before but my former PCP never told me I had it. But I seen it on an old Mri.

The pain every where was exhausting and some days it still is.

But I decided the heck with all these doctors and I decided to eat mostly plant based but I do still eat chicken fish or turkey now and then and rarely beef.

I ride my recumbent bike 2x a day and I walk when I can. And some days even when I should rest I go walk anyway.

Today’s pictures and videos are from my morning walk : and it’s also one year ago I quit smoking……so it’s a great day !

Pain or no pain I’m not going to just sit around.

Sitting is death

Moving is life

And ya know after I’m done I feel so much better.

1 year since I’ve quit smoking after being a smoker for 40 years. My lungs are feel better my walking speed has improved my distance has improved

1 year since I started eating a healthy mostly plant based but I’m not a vegan and it’s good clean healthy real colorful food . I am using food as medicine in a way to fight pain and inflammation . Now sure I eat a cookie or 2 now and then just not every day. And all my other choices are good so I don’t deprive myself of a treat now and then.

And for having Osteonecrosis,Osteoarthritis, Spondylolisthesis with a bilateral pats fracture in my L5 S1 I feel pretty darn good today even in this cold weather.

Just need to drop some weight one step and one day at a time.

I have taken my life back and no one is going to stop me !

Tomorrow I may be in pain and that’s ok. I can accept that but as long as I know I am doing all I can to combat my pain and keep my body moving and providing it with the best nutrients possible(most of the time)

It’s a win win for me ,one day at a time !

Keep your meds , keep your cigarettes keep your junk fast food.

Body Heal Thy Self

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Ancestry, Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Chronic Pain, Clinical Trials, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Food, Happiness, History, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, OA, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Osteoporosis, Pain, SONK, SPONK, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Uncategorized, WegoHealth

Bone & Joint Action Week October 12-20

Bone and Joint Action Week is held annually October 12-20 with activities focused on disorders including arthritis, back pain, Osteonecrosis,Osteoarthritis trauma, pediatric conditions, and osteoporosis. The themes and their related activities are designed to raise awareness worldwide about prevention, disease management and treatment.

Statistics on Avascular Necrosis (AVN, Osteonecrosis, Aseptic Necrosis, Ischaemic Necrosis, Femoral Head Necrosis)

Frequency depends on the site involved. The most common site is the hip; other locations include the carpals, talus, and humerus. In most countries, exact figures on incidence and prevalence are unknown.

One Japanese survey estimated that 2500-3300 cases of AVN of the hip occur each year; of which, 34.7% were a result of corticosteroid abuse, 21.8% to alcohol abuse, and 37.1% to idiopathic mechanisms. A French study reported AVN in 4.3% of allogenic bone marrow transplant recipients.

Race: No racial predilection exists except for AVN associated with sickle cell disease and hemoglobin S and SC disease, which predominantly are diagnosed in people of African and Mediteranean descent.

Sex: The male-to-female ratio depends on the underlying cause, although primary AVN is more prevalent in men. The overall male-to-female ratio is 8:1.

Age: Age at onset depends on the underlying cause. Primary AVN most often occurs during the fourth or fifth decade and is bilateral in 40-80% of cases. On average, women present almost 10 years later than men.

Risk Factors for Avascular Necrosis (AVN, Osteonecrosis, Aseptic Necrosis, Ischaemic Necrosis, Femoral Head Necrosis)

Avascular necrosis has several causes. Loss of blood supply to the bone can be caused by an injury (trauma-related avascular necrosis or joint dislocation) or by certain risk factors (nontraumatic avascular necrosis), such as some medications (usually steroid basesd), steroid abuse in general, blood coagulation disorders like sickle cell, Factor V, FactorViii, MTHFR, eNOS and more, chemo and radiation infections in the Bone vascular issues such as vascularitis or alcohol abuse. Increased pressure within the bone also is associated with avascular necrosis. The pressure within the bone causes the blood vessels to narrow, making it hard for the vessels to deliver enough blood to the bone cells.Many deep sea divers get Avascular Necrosis from a condition known as the bends. Gaucher disease.

Progression of Avascular Necrosis (AVN, Osteonecrosis, Aseptic Necrosis, Ischaemic Necrosis, Femoral Head Necrosis)

Hip Stages of avn-on

1-4

The natural history of osteonecrosis is directly linked to the size and level of the necrosis. Very small lesions (involvement of less than 15% of the femoral head) may resolve without any further treatment. Conversly, lesions involving greater than 50% of the femoral head progress to collapse, and ultimately require in total hip arthroplasty.

Symptoms of Avascular Necrosis (AVN, Osteonecrosis, Aseptic Necrosis, Ischaemic Necrosis, Femoral Head Necrosis)

In the early stages of avascular necrosis, patients may be asymptomatic. However, as the disease progresses most patients will begin to experience joint pain; at first, only when putting weight on the affected joint, and eventually even when resting. Pain usually develops gradually and may be mild or severe.

If the level of necrosis progresses further and the bone and surrounding joint surface collapse, pain may develop or dramatically increase.

The pain may be severe enough to limit the patient’s range of motion in the affected joint.

In some cases, particularly those involving the hip, disabling osteoarthritis may develop.

The period of time between the first symptoms and loss of joint function is different for each patient, ranging from several months to more than a year.

How is Avascular Necrosis (AVN, Osteonecrosis, Aseptic Necrosis, Ischaemic Necrosis, Femoral Head Necrosis) Diagnosed?

In the earliest stages of Avascular necrosis plain x-rays are often normal. A magnetic resonance image (MRI) is the key that allows us to detect AVN at its earliest stage.

Osteonecrosis develops when the blood supply to a segment of bone is disrupted. Without adequate nourishment, the affected portion of bone dies and gradually collapses. As a result, the articular cartilage covering the bone also collapses, leading to disabling arthritis.

Osteonecrosis of the knee can affect anyone, but is more common in people over the age of 60. Woman are three times more likely than men to develop the condition.

Risk Factors

It is not always known what causes the lack of blood supply, but doctors have identified a number of risk factors that make someone more likely to develop osteonecrosis.

Injury. A knee injury—such as a stress fracture or dislocation, meniscus tear, bruised patella or combined with some type of trauma to the knee, can damage blood vessels and reduce blood flow to the affected bone.

Oral corticosteroid medications.

Many diseases, such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis, are treated with oral steroid medications.

Although it is not known exactly why these medications can lead to osteonecrosis, research shows that there is a connection between the disease and long-term steroid use. Steroid-induced osteonecrosis frequently affects multiple joints in the body.

Medical conditions.

Osteonecrosis of the knee is associated with medical conditions, such as obesity, sickle cell anemia, and lupus.

Transplants. Organ transplantation, especially kidney transplant, is associated with osteonecrosis.

Excessive alcohol use.

Overconsumption of alcohol over time can cause fatty deposits to form in the blood vessels as well as elevated cortisone levels, resulting in a decreased blood supply to the bone.

Chemo therapy and radiation Non-traumatic osteonecrosis of bone is recognized as a potential complication in solid-tumour cancer patients receiving treatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy.

Regardless of the cause, if osteonecrosis is not identified and treated early, it can develop into severe osteoarthritis. And for some with osteoarthritis before avn the disease is even more painful.

Knee stages of avn-on

1-4

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#AvascularNecrosis

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#BoneAndJointHealth

#BonePain

#Awareness

#Spondylolisthesis

#Spondy

#ChronicPain

#RheumatoidArthritis

#Spoonie

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If you found this information helpful please subscribe, like and share anything you see in here.

Together we can make a difference and help so many Men ,Women and Children.

Have a blessed and Pain-free Day.

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Baking, Blessed, Bone Health, Breakthrough Crew, BreakThroughCrew, Candy, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Clinical Trials, Croatian Family, Delicious, Desserts, Diagnosed, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, Endocrinologist, Factor V Leiden, Family Tradition, Opinions, Thoughts, Uncategorized

Blogs

I think I will be starting a new blog just for recipes

Opinions? I really want your opinions

Since I am a health leader and advocate who lives with several chronic conditions

Should I focus on just that or have a mix

Posted in Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Chronic Pain, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, Positivity, StopTheClot, Vision, WegoHealth

The Beauty And Pain Of Autumn

Autumn (British English) or fall (American English) is one of the four temperate seasons. Autumn marks the transition from summer to winter, in September (Northern Hemisphere) or March (Southern Hemisphere), when the duration of daylight becomes noticeably shorter and the temperature cools down considerably.

Fall is a season for balancing light and dark, letting go, and accepting the impermanence of things.

My body seems to know that bad weather season is coming, with summer on the way out and fall on the way in the bone pain goes crazy from mild to intense to unbearable all in a 24/48 hrs time frame.

I was hoping to live in Florida by now.

But with one set back after another since December 2016 husbands heart attack and stents.

2017 my stress test, echo , Mri’s and umbilical hernia surgery I wonder will we ever get to Florida.

Seems like there is always something and I’m not talking small somethings, they are always big intense stressful something’s.

I miss my family , I am so tired also of the pain that will come daily from mid fall until mid spring. I am sick of pain, I’m not ready for it again.

It hurts the soul always being in pain. Day in and day out pain. It’s overwhelming sometimes. It’s depressing some days.

So I have my granddaughters bedroom a mess it’s loaded with boxes.

Donate

Keep

Purge

Why do we really keep papers,paystubs etc 7-10 years? It’s crazy. Hopefully my husband gets a move on before I do it haha.

What’s bothering me is that little movement causes painful stiffness and just overall poor mind body health. I like to move about. No I can’t hike like I used to. Maybe some day.

Big movements are good, like walking in the sunshine ,or a stroll in the park to sorting through a pile of books (as long as they aren’t too heavy.)  And the problem is that I just don’t have enough of these big movements to keep my joints happy.  I’m home a lot these days, the colder it gets the more I’m stuck in doors, meaning the more pain I have.

I can ride my recumbent bike and do some small chores staying useful without using up too many of my spoons.

Typing on the computer or reading or watching tv isn’t my thing especially when that’s all there will be to do.

So good luck during the changing of the seasons

At least it’s pretty.

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Clinical Trials, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Eye Exam, Factor V Leiden, Flush not Blush, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Recipes, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Uncategorized, Vision, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards

Would appreciate your vote.

Just 2 days left to cast your vote , you can vote for each category I was nominated for. I would appreciate it very much.

Please take a moment to vote for me.

Link to vote.

WEGOHealthAwards

Blog

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Posted in Awareness, BreakThroughCrew, Clinical Trials, Diagnosed, Positivity, Uncategorized

Join The Breakthrough Crew

Become A member!

Who can participate?

Anyone and everyone! Patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, and individuals who believe in the power of research to transform lives.

What does participation entail?

As an official Breakthrough Crew Ambassador, your role is to help achieve the above three core goals through the following (please note that completing each of the following is not a requirement; think of these as a list of friendly suggestions!):

Raising awareness via social media

Sharing your story via a blog, video, pictures, art, performance, etc.

Representing the Breakthrough Crew at local healthcare events

Proudly wearing your #BreakthroughCrew swag

Participating in #BreakthroughCrew Twitter chats

For more information

Breakthrough Crew

Posted in Awareness, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Chronic Pain, Uncategorized

Clinical Trials Help & Save Lives

Clinical trials are an important step in discovering new treatments for so many diseases as well as new ways to detect, diagnose , and reduce the risk of getting a disease.

Clinical trials show researchers what helps and doesn’t help in people.

Clinical trials also help researchers and doctors decide if the side effects of a new treatment are acceptable when weighed against the benefits offered by a new form of treatment.

Researchers don't know what the results of clinical trials will be. (If they did, they wouldn't have to do the trials.)

The uncertainty can make it hard to decide if you want to participate in clinical trial.

In rare cases, clinical trial volunteers have been hurt by the treatment or procedure being tested. At the same time, hundreds of thousands of people have been helped and are alive because other people chose to participate in a trial that resulted in a new, more effective treatment.

While clinical trials are important, the choice to participate in one is very personal and depends on your unique situation.

As with any disease before getting treatment, you and your doctor need to weigh the benefits against the risks and decide what's best for you.

Clinical trials are just one of the many types of research that's done before a new treatment or drug becomes available to everyone .

New medicines must first be discovered, purified, and tested in preclinical trials before researchers even think about clinical trials.

On average, a new medicine to treat disease has been studied for at least 4 to 5 years (and sometimes many more) before a clinical trial on it is started.

Would you participate in a clinical trial?

I think I would.

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