Posted in Adrenals, Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Awareness, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Delicious, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Hashimoto, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, SONK, SPONK, Uncategorized, Vegetables, WegoHealth, wellness

Healthy Eating

Developing healthy eating habits isn’t as confusing or as restrictive as many people imagine. The essential steps are to eat mostly foods derived from plants—vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes (beans, peas, lentils)—and limit highly processed foods.

 

For most of my life, I ate the standard American diet and meals that were heavy in meat and processed foods. I went to a vegetarian lifestyle in high school for a couple years then back to the old way.

When i was diagnosed with Osteonecrosis, Osteoarthritis HBP etc and especially when my husband had a heart attack in 2016 I thought enough was enough.

I got rid of a lot of processed foods, potato chips, convenience meals, and loved Oreo’s and Nutter Butter cookies. There was a lot of sugar, oil, and junk in my diet.

We quit smoking 2 years ago almost. and we as a team decided to go part time but mostly vegan .

Me having a few issues from Osteonecrosis, Osteoarthritis, Hashimot’s and Hypothyroidism and Adrenal Fatigue left me in pain and always exhausted.

I had been dealing with pain in my knee and back for a few years. My mind wants to go go go like it did 25 years ago, my knees say oh hell no slow down woman. And this extra weight is just hard on the bones. But when your limited by many bone issues its really hard to just walk 3-4 miles a day. I bike 3-4 miles a day but its not the same as a good hike in the woods. I do go now and then walking in the woods but hiking I’m afraid for now all that has been on hold.

Going to mostly plant based has helped my pain. And my energy.

So its working and I am feeling better slowly …..

Its a process…

Don’t just go all I went to 65 percent of eating all veggies daily  then added more from there. Some days i eat no meat or fish and some days i will. I Slowly cut out animal products, starting with the easiest and leaving barrier foods to the end. Slowly lessened  my consumption of animal products while simultaneously increasing the number of plant-based foods in our diet.

I spoke to my doctors and I will post tomorrow just how i got started

 

 

plantsz

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, spondylolisthesis, Thyroid, Uncategorized, Weather, WegoHealth

Reasons Why The Cold Weather Can Affect Your Body

As we finally approach the end of winter the pain has probably began to increase in regards to spondylolisthesis, or any other bone or joint problem.

I have been blessed to have several bone issues.

Bone pain is always worse in winter and long rainy cool spells.

This may just be some odd coincidence, but I believe there are a few possible factors for this increase in the cold months.

Pay attention to the following reasons and see if you also have experienced any of them.

If you have or if you do feel an increase of pain with the cold weather, try to make a few adjustments to combat the following possibilites.

1. Cold weather leads to lazziness.

For me personally, when I sit around more often than not I get extremely tight in the hips and low back area.  I lose stability and strength in areas that are crucial for maintaining good health and providing relief for my low back.

I don’t always want to be active because besides having spondylolisthesis, which alone is so painful I have osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis.

I guess it’s the universes way of saying hey Deb your bones are jacked!

When the temperature drops, those outdoor activities disappear and unfortunately they are replaced by lots more sitting.  Sitting is not good. Our bodies were not meant to sit. Especially if it’s hours at a time.

Daily walks long or short are replaced by computer activities. 

Many other outdoor activities are replaced by sitting and watching them on TV. 

Solution:

I try to stay active as much as possible considering I have several bone issue challenges

Trips to indoor malls , the library, or bookstore , museum Instead of sitting is best.

I haven’t been able to do my favorite outdoor activity hiking since I was diagnosed with osteonecrosis in my knee 4 years ago and I miss it terribly. I hope someday I can get back to it. I have faith.

One of the main things I do is to stay disciplined with my daily workouts well I call them workouts.

I stay as conscientious as I can of how much I sit and try hard to not sit for long periods of time.

Yes there’s days I do but mostly I don’t.

When I work on the computer, I try to get up every 15 minutes or so even if it only involves a quick hip stretch or movement.

No matter how cold it gets outside, I try to stay as active as I can by replacing old outdoor activities with new indoor activities that involve movement.

This has really helped me to avoid cold weather setbacks with my back and often my knee. But don’t get me wrong I still will get some bad days it’s just not everyday or all day.

The worst is when we have long days of extreme cold or that dreaded all day rain that chills you, the back hurts the knee hurts and the entire body hurts .

Sometimes it’s exhausting.

But I try to keep somewhat busy.

Thank goodness for my recumbent bike.

Some days I just do a mile 1-2x a day and that’s ok. Other days I do 3 miles 1-2 x a day.

2. Cold weather can lead to poor eating habits.

Just like in the first example, when you sit around more and become lazy you usually begin to eat poorly. 

Often times shear boredom leads to bad eating habits. That bag of chips or chocolate cake that you usually would ignore in the summer begins to work its way back into your diet.

The cold weather months typically cause people to put on a few more pounds. 

I haven’t put on weight but I can never seem to lose it no matter what I do……thanks hypothyroidism

For many holidays do not help either.  Large amounts of sitting around and eating during Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years are often to blame for excess pounds.

This leads to a snowball effect of being lazy.  You sit around more which creates the sense of boredom. 

Many people replace being bored with the feeling of hunger , I used to do that.

You then overeat causing the body to feel lethargic and lazy and the cycle continues.

Before you know it you plow through a box of cookies and a bowl of ice cream while you sit and watch six hours of re-runs of your favorite TV show.

Talk about creating a perfect storm!

The entire body then becomes inflamed at least for me it did.

So I changed

I stopped most not all of the processed snacks.

I started eating more plant based but I am not a vegan as I do have fish or chicken 1x a week and eggs a couple times a week.

My pain level dropped a lot but I feel healthier still waiting for the weight to fall off.

The sitting and excess weight reduces the ability to move properly which could create instability, weakness and eventually painful spondylolisthesis episodes.

These habits take the place of the activities you are used to in the warmer months wher you spend more time being active and not thinking about food.

Solution:

I tend to fight this cycle by paying close attention to what I eat and I’m learning to drink-extra water.  I find that providing my body with plenty of water helps to fight those boring food craves. 

This in combination with staying active helps to keep away the extra cold weather added pounds but more important the inflammation that throws pain scale off the chart.

3.Cold weather makes working out and exercising much harder.

I find that when the weather drops workouts tend to become much harder.

Those quick trips to the park or walk in the plaza get harder when you have to scrape ice off of your car for fifteen minutes. It’s a pain to put on 2 layers of clothing just to stay warm on your way to the store really sucks.

My daily workouts are crucial to staying pain free. Without them my body gets weak, tight and doesn’t move the way it should. IPain is quick to follow.

Mentally I do not let myself get down or lazy. If the temperature is freezing outside I stay in and ride the bike more do gentle stretches.

More often than not if I feel like skipping a workout and I just tell myself to replace the workout with a good warm-up and stretch, I get through the stretch and I am suddenly motivated to workout. That workout that I wanted to skip then turns into a great stretch and workout.

I just know when I have pain or have no pain I feel better when I am moving . I can’t do many things I used to but I can learn new ways.

I have noticed that when we stay mindful and not become stagnant in my life i feel better.

And for that

I am grateful

Here’s some stretches I do to help my spondylolisthesis

Spondylolisthesis Exercise

How I get the kinks out

Shoulders and Back

Hmmm love these guys.

Can meniscus tear heal

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The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only.

The purpose of this website is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics.

Based on my own health issues.

It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Thank you.

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Cancer, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Disclaimer, Ease your Stress, Energy, Happiness, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, Pain, Sleep Better, Thoughts, Uncategorized

Relax and Help Pain & Anxiety Through Various Techniques

I used to be stressed all the time. Especially when trying to manage life with one or two chronic conditions.

Now it’s occasional stress and pain all depends…..

But I have found some relief and I believe it’s because I have learned to relax using a variety of methods. My favorite is breathing 4-7-8 I read about this from Dr Andrew Weil .

This is followed by the five-step procedure listed below:

1 Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound.

2 Close your mouth and inhale quietly through your nose to a mental count of four.

3 Hold your breath for a count of seven.

4 Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound to a count of eight.

5 This is one breath. Now inhale again and repeat the cycle three more times for a total of four breaths.

Dr Andrew Weil emphasizes the most important part of this process is holding your breath for eight seconds. This is because keeping the breath in will allow oxygen to fill your lungs and then circulate throughout the body. It is this that produces a relaxing effect in the body.

I personally find it relaxing and you can use it anytime you feel stress and or anxiety.

I’ve tried a few things and this is the topic for today.

Daily I use

I use breathing 4-7-8i

I also am grateful for everything

Weekly

EFT Tapping (more about that below)

I also practice mindful meditation a few days a week when I walk especially.

I want to share with you ways that helped me, and maybe they can help you.

Make sure you get the ok from your doctor before starting anything new.

Relaxation Techniques
Using the Relaxation Response to Relieve Stress

For many of us, relaxation means zoning out in front of the TV at the end of a stressful day. But this does little to reduce the damaging effects of stress that add to disease and poor health. To effectively combat stress, we need to activate our body’s natural relaxation response.

You can do this by learning and practicing relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation, rhythmic exercise, and yoga.

Adding one or all of these activities into your life can help really reduce your everyday stress, and it will boost your mood, and improve your mental focus and physical health.

What is the relaxation response?
When stress overwhelms your nervous system, your body is flooded with chemicals that prepare you for “fight or flight.

Your stress response can be lifesaving in emergency situations where you need to act quickly. But when it’s constantly activated by the stresses of everyday life, it can wear your body down and take a toll on your-health both physical and emotional.

I was at my Naturopath’s a few months ago and she did what she called tapping. I felt this sense of peace and relief, like a huge weight was lifted from my shoulder.

If you’re like me and many other people, you feel trapped, whether it’s due to daily stress , work or school stress, family stress , stress that comes with having a chronic condition etc…we all can get caught in this cycle. The Stress Cycle

You’re tired of feeling sad, depressed, anxious, discontent, and unwell. You’re sick of the expensive and ineffective treatments. You’re fed up with relinquishing the power over your health and happiness to doctors.

You want to be your best, living a life that is filled with peacefulness, joy, and fulfillment, from day to day and moment to moment.

Tapping

Meditation

Yoga

Deep Breathing

These can all help I will post some links below to help you learn more.

No one can avoid all stress, but you can learn to how to counteract its detrimental effects in the body mind and spirit.

The relaxation response puts the brakes on stress and brings your body and mind back into a state of equilibrium.

When the relaxation response is activated, your:
heart rate slows down
breathing becomes slower and deeper
blood pressure drops or stabilizes
muscles relax
blood flow to the brain increases

In addition to its calming physical effects, the relaxation response also increases energy and focus, combats illness, relieves aches and pains, heightens problem-solving abilities, and boosts motivation and productivity. Best of all, anyone can reap these benefits with regular practice.

There is no single relaxation technique that is best for everyone. The right relaxation technique is the one that resonates with you, fits your lifestyle, and is able to focus your mind and interrupt your everyday thoughts to elicit the relaxation response.

You may even find that alternating or combining different techniques provide the best results.
How you react to stress may also influence the relaxation technique that works best for you:

The “fight” response. If you tend to become angry, agitated, or keyed up under stress, you may respond best to stress relief activities that quiet you down, such as meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, deep breathing, or guided imagery.

The “flight” response. If you tend to become depressed, withdrawn, or spaced out under stress, you may respond best to stress relief activities that areenergize your nervous system, such as rhythmic exercise, massage, mindfulness, or power yoga.

The immobilization response. If you’ve experienced some type of trauma and tend to “freeze” or become “stuck” under stress, your challenge is to first rouse your nervous system to a fight or flight response (above) so you can employ the applicable stress relief techniques. To do this, choose physical activity that engages both your arms and legs, such as running, dancing, or tai chi, and perform it mindfully, focusing on the sensations in your limbs as you move.

Deep breathing
With its focus on full, cleansing breaths, deep breathing is a simple yet powerful relaxation technique. It’s easy to learn, can be practiced almost anywhere, and provides a quick way to get your stress levels in check. Deep breathing is the cornerstone of many other relaxation practices, too, and can be combined with other relaxing elements such as aromatherapy and music. All you really need is a few minutes and a place to stretch out.

How to practice deep breathing

The key to deep breathing is to breathe deeply from the abdomen, getting as much fresh air as possible in your lungs. When you take deep breaths from the abdomen, rather than shallow breaths from your upper chest, you inhale more oxygen. The more oxygen you get, the less tense, short of breath, and anxious you feel.
Sit comfortably with your back straight. Put one hand on your chest and the other on your stomach.
Breathe in through your nose. The hand on your stomach should rise. The hand on your chest should move very little.
Exhale through your mouth, pushing out as much air as you can while contracting your abdominal muscles. The hand on your stomach should move in as you exhale, but your other hand should move very little.
Continue to breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth. Try to inhale enough so that your lower abdomen rises and falls. Count slowly as you exhale.
If you find it difficult breathing from your abdomen while sitting up, try lying down. Put a small book on your stomach, and breathe so that the book rises as you inhale and falls as you exhale.

Mindfulness meditation
Rather than worrying about the future or dwelling on the past, mindfulness meditation switches the focus to what’s happening right now, enabling you to be fully engaged in the present moment.

By focusing your attention on a single repetitive action, such as your breathing, other forms of mindfulness meditation encourage you to follow and then release internal thoughts or sensations. Mindfulness can also be applied to activities such as walking, exercising, or eating.
A basic mindfulness exercise:
1. Sit on a straight-backed chair or cross-legged on the floor.
2. Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling.
3. Once you’ve narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations, and thoughts.
4. Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.

Rhythmic movement and mindful exercise
The idea of exercising may not sound particularly soothing, but rhythmic exercise that gets you into a flow of repetitive movement can be very relaxing. Examples include:
Running
Walking
Swimming
Dancing
Rowing
Climbing
For maximum stress relief, add mindfulness to your workout
While simply engaging in rhythmic exercise will help you relieve stress, if you add a mindfulness component on top, you’ll get even more benefit.
As with meditation, mindful exercise requires being fully engaged in the present moment—paying attention to how your body feels right now, rather than your daily worries or concerns. In order to “turn off” your thoughts, focus on the sensations in your limbs and how your breathing complements your movement.
If you’re walking or running, for example, focus on the sensation of your feet touching the ground, the rhythm of your breath, and the feeling of the wind against your face. If your mind wanders to other thoughts, gently return to focusing on your breathing and movement.
Visualization
Visualization, or guided imagery, is a variation on traditional meditation that involves imagining a scene in which you feel at peace, free to let go of all tension and anxiety. Choose whatever setting is most calming to you, whether it’s a tropical beach, a favorite childhood spot, or a quiet wooded glen.
You can practice visualization on your own or with a therapist (or an audio recording of a therapist) guiding you through the imagery. You can also choose to do your visualization in silence or use listening aids, such as soothing music or a sound machine or recording that matches your chosen setting—the sound of ocean waves if you’ve chosen a beach, for example.
Practicing visualization
Close your eyes and imagine your restful place. Picture it as vividly as you can—everything you can see, hear, smell, taste, and feel.

Just “looking” at it like you would a photograph is not enough. Visualization works best if you incorporate as many sensory details as possible.
For example, if you are thinking about a dock on a quiet lake:
See the rise or set
Hear the birds singing
Smell the pine trees
Feel the cool water on your bare feet
Taste the fresh, clean air
Enjoy the feeling of your worries drifting away as you slowly explore your restful place. When you are ready, gently open your eyes and come back to the present.
Don’t worry if you sometimes zone out or lose track of where you are during a visualization session. This is normal. You may also experience feelings of heaviness in your limbs, muscle twitches, or yawning. Again, these are normal responses.
Yoga and tai chi
Yoga involves a series of both moving and stationary poses, combined with deep breathing. As well as reducing anxiety and stress, yoga can also improve flexibility, strength, balance, and stamina. Since injuries can happen when yoga is practiced incorrectly, it’s best to learn by attending group classes, hiring a private teacher, or at least following video instructions. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others, tailoring your practice as you see fit.

If you’re unsure whether a specific yoga class is appropriate for stress relief, call the studio or ask the teacher.
Tai chi
If you’ve seen a group of people in the park slowly moving in synch, you’ve probably witnessed tai chi. Tai chi is a self-paced, non-competitive series of slow, flowing body movements. By focusing your mind on the movements and your breathing, you keep your attention on the present, which clears the mind and leads to a relaxed state.
Tai chi is a safe, low-impact option for people of all ages and fitness levels, including older adults and those recovering from injuries. As with yoga, it’s best learned in a class or from a private instructor. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others.
Self-massage
You’re probably already aware how much a professional massage at a spa or health club can help reduce stress, relieve pain, and ease muscle tension. What you may not be aware of is that you can experience many of the same benefits at home or work by practicing self-massage—or trading massages with a loved one.
Try taking a few minutes to massage yourself at your desk between tasks, on the couch at the end of a hectic day, or in bed to help you unwind before sleep. To enhance relaxation, you can use aromatic oil, scented lotion, or combine self-message with mindfulness or deep breathing techniques.

Start a regular relaxation practice
Learning the basics of these relaxation techniques takes regular practice to truly harness their stress-relieving power.

Most stress experts recommend setting aside at least 10 to 20 minutes a day for your relaxation practice I mean we surely can find 10 minutes….If you’d like to maximize the benefits, work toward 30 minutes to an hour…I am still working on this myself. I’m good for 15 minutes.

Tips for making relaxation techniques part of your life
Set aside time in your daily schedule. If possible, schedule a set time once or twice a day for your practice.

If your schedule is already packed, remember that many relaxation techniques can be practiced while you’re doing other things.

Try meditating while commuting on the bus or train, taking a yoga or tai chi break at lunchtime, or practicing mindful walking while exercising your dog.

Just don’t practice this stuff when you’re sleepy. These techniques are so relaxing that they can make you very sleepy I have fallen asleep many times when learning to meditate or use sounds to help me relax.

However, you will get the most benefit if you practice when you’re fully alert.

Expect ups and downs. Don’t be discouraged if you skip a few days or even a few weeks. Just keep trying.

If you exercise, improve the relaxation benefits by adopting mindfulness, try focusing your attention on your body. If you’re resistance training, for example, focus on coordinating your breathing with your movements and pay attention to how your body feels.

Now tapping this provides relief from chronic pain, emotional problems, disorders, addictions, phobias, post traumatic stress disorder, and physical diseases. I read Tapping is newly set to revolutionize the field of health and wellness, the healing concepts that it’s based upon have been in practice in Eastern medicine for over 5,000 years.

Like acupuncture and acupressure, Tapping is a set of techniques which utilize the body’s energy meridian points. You can stimulate these meridian points by tapping on them with your fingertips – literally tapping into your body’s own energy and healing power.

The basic technique requires you to focus on the negative emotion at hand: a fear or anxiety, a bad memory, an unresolved problem, or anything that’s bothering you. While maintaining your mental focus on this issue, use your fingertips to tap 5-7 times each on 12 of the body’s meridian points.

Tapping on these meridian points – while concentrating on accepting and resolving the negative emotion – will access your body’s energy, restoring it to a balanced state.

You may be wondering about these meridians.

Put simply, energy circulates through your body along a specific network of channels. You can tap into this energy at any point along the system.

This concept comes from the doctrines of traditional Chinese medicine, which referred to the body’s energy as “ch’i.” In ancient times, the Chinese discovered 100 meridian points. They also discovered that by stimulating these meridian points, they could heal.

Call it energy, call it the Source, call it life force, call it ch’i… Whatever you want to call it, it works.

In some ways, Tapping is similar to acupuncture.

Like Tapping, acupuncture achieves healing through stimulating the body’s meridians and energy flow.

However, unlike Tapping, acupuncture involves needles! “No needles” is definitely one of the advantages of Tapping.

Here is a video of how to begin tapping to ease pain another video is to help anxiety

For Pain Relief. https://youtu.be/5hYE0Wt4Sxs,

https://youtu.be/tQRQn1NpkzA ,

Tapping PainRelief

Pain relief Tap version 2

All About EFT Tapping https://youtu.be/ZfZBHWSbrsg

Tapping helps to heal-many parts of your life TEDx

TEDx Tapping https://youtu.be/ZfZBHWSbrsg

Some other links for meditation

Meditation For Pain https://youtu.be/r3qBlVfPzXo

Tibetan Sounds Meditation https://youtu.be/RgqxZU6_qOY

Help chronic pain and disease https://youtu.be/gaY4m00wXpw

Yoga for beginners with disabilities Yoga if disabled https://youtu.be/tyeMFy9KkTY

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Energy, exercise, Factor V Leiden, Food Is Thy Medicine, Heart Disease, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Positivity, SONK, StopTheClot, Thoughts, Uncategorized, Vision, Weather, WegoHealth, Winter, Women

1 year ago I decided to take my health back

Happy Anniversary To My Health….

I was always pretty healthy ….until I wasn’t.

I gained weight , injured my knee gained more weight was diagnosed with one thing after another and it was really exhausting.

First osteoarthritis and hypothyroidism at age 45

They torn meniscus age 51

Then thanks to the meniscus tear Osteonecrosis set in my knee….

Then she 53 diagnosed officially with spondylolisthesis and a bilateral pars fracture

I had the spondylolisthesis before but my former PCP never told me I had it. But I seen it on an old Mri.

The pain every where was exhausting and some days it still is.

But I decided the heck with all these doctors and I decided to eat mostly plant based but I do still eat chicken fish or turkey now and then and rarely beef.

I ride my recumbent bike 2x a day and I walk when I can. And some days even when I should rest I go walk anyway.

Today’s pictures and videos are from my morning walk : and it’s also one year ago I quit smoking……so it’s a great day !

Pain or no pain I’m not going to just sit around.

Sitting is death

Moving is life

And ya know after I’m done I feel so much better.

1 year since I’ve quit smoking after being a smoker for 40 years. My lungs are feel better my walking speed has improved my distance has improved

1 year since I started eating a healthy mostly plant based but I’m not a vegan and it’s good clean healthy real colorful food . I am using food as medicine in a way to fight pain and inflammation . Now sure I eat a cookie or 2 now and then just not every day. And all my other choices are good so I don’t deprive myself of a treat now and then.

And for having Osteonecrosis,Osteoarthritis, Spondylolisthesis with a bilateral pats fracture in my L5 S1 I feel pretty darn good today even in this cold weather.

Just need to drop some weight one step and one day at a time.

I have taken my life back and no one is going to stop me !

Tomorrow I may be in pain and that’s ok. I can accept that but as long as I know I am doing all I can to combat my pain and keep my body moving and providing it with the best nutrients possible(most of the time)

It’s a win win for me ,one day at a time !

Keep your meds , keep your cigarettes keep your junk fast food.

Body Heal Thy Self

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Bone Health, Cancer, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Factor V Leiden, Great American SmokeOut, Heart Disease, Uncategorized

Great American SmokeOut

Every year, on the third Thursday of November, smokers across the nation take part in the American Cancer Society Great American Smokeout event. Encourage someone you know to use the date to make a plan to quit, or plan in advance and then quit smoking that day. By quitting – even for 1 day – smokers will be taking an important step toward a healthier life and reducing their cancer risk.

The American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout is an annual event that encourages smokers to make a plan to quit smoking .

The 42nd annual Great American Smokeout will be held today November 16, 2017.

About 36.5 million Americans still smoke cigarettes, and tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the world. While cigarette smoking rates have dropped (from 42% in 1965 to 15.1% in 2015), cigar, pipe, and hookah – other dangerous and addictive ways to smoke tobacco – are very much on the rise. Smoking kills people – there’s no “safe” way to smoke tobacco.

Quitting smoking has immediate and long-term benefits at any age. Quitting is hard, but you can increase your chances of success with help. Getting help through counseling or medications can double or triple the chances of quitting successfully.

Benefits of Quitting Smoking Over Time

It’s never too late to quit using tobacco. The sooner you quit, the more you can reduce your chances of getting cancer and other diseases.

Within minutes of smoking your last cigarette, your body begins to recover:

20 minutes after quitting

Your heart rate and blood pressure drop.

(Mahmud A, Feely J. Effect of smoking on arterial stiffness and pulse pressure amplification. Hypertension. 2003;41(1):183-187.)

12 hours after quitting

The carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.

(US Surgeon General’s Report, 1988, p. 202)

2 weeks to 3 months after quitting

Your circulation improves and your lung function increases.

(US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp. 193, 194, 196, 285, 323)

1 to 9 months after quitting

Coughing and shortness of breath decrease. Tiny hair-like structures that move mucus out of the lungs (called cilia) start to regain normal function in your lungs, increasing their ability to handle mucus, clean the lungs, and reduce the risk of infection.

(US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp. 285-287, 304)

1 year after quitting

The excess risk of coronary heart disease is half that of someone who still smokes. Your heart attack risk drops dramatically.

(US Surgeon General’s Report, 2010, p. 359)

5 years after quitting

Your risk of cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus, and bladder is cut in half. Cervical cancer risk falls to that of a non-smoker. Your stroke risk can fall to that of a non-smoker after 2 to 5 years.

(US Surgeon General’s Report, 2010 and World Health Organization. Tobacco Control: Reversal of Risk After Quitting Smoking. IARC Handbooks of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 11. 2007, p. 341.)

10 years after quitting

Your risk of dying from lung cancer is about half that of a person who is still smoking. Your risk of cancer of the larynx (voice box) and pancreas decreases.

(US Surgeon General’s Report, 2010 and US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp. vi, 155, 165)

15 years after quitting

Your risk of coronary heart disease is that of a non-smoker’s.

(World Health Organization. Tobacco Control: Reversal of Risk After Quitting Smoking. IARC Handbooks of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 11. 2007, p. 11.)

These are just a few of the benefits of quitting smoking for good. Quitting smoking lowers your risk of diabetes, lets blood vessels work better, and helps your heart and lungs.

Life expectancy for smokers is at least 10 years shorter than that of non-smokers. Quitting smoking before the age of 40 reduces the risk of dying from smoking-related disease by about 90%.

Quitting while you’re younger will reduce your health risks more, but quitting at any age can give back years of life that would be lost by continuing to smoke.

Are there benefits of quitting that I’ll notice right away?

Kicking the tobacco habit offers some rewards that you’ll notice right away and some that will show up over time.

Right away you’ll save the money you spent on tobacco! And here are just a few other benefits you may notice:

Food tastes better.

Your sense of smell returns to normal.

Your breath, hair, and clothes smell better.

Your teeth and fingernails stop yellowing.

Ordinary activities leave you less out of breath (for example, climbing stairs or light housework).

You can be in smoke-free buildings without having to go outside to smoke.

Quitting also helps stop the damaging effects of tobacco on how you look, including premature wrinkling of your skin, gum disease, and tooth loss.

I quit 10 months ago after a family member had a heart attack and I had a stress test running in a treadmill that I passed but barely.

You owe it to yourself and to your family to live your best life.

I am so glad I quit. I breathe better , and although my bones still ache I don’t have the consent debilitating pain I had a year or two ago and I know that because I stopped smoking is a Factor.

Our home doesn’t stink of cigarette smell, our clothes our hair.

I actually hate the smell of cigarettes now and can’t believe I used to smell like that.

Give it a try…..

And here’s a note for all you weed smokers out there….

One of the few things scientists know for sure about marijuana and cardiovascular health is that people with established heart disease who are under stress develop chest pain more quickly if they have been smoking marijuana than they would have otherwise. This is because of complex effects cannabinoids have on the cardiovascular system, including raising resting heart rate, dilating blood vessels, and making the heart pump harder. Research suggests that the risk of heart attack is several times higher in the hour after smoking marijuana than it would be normally.

Thinking of chilling out kicking back and lighting up a joint?

Think again.

A new study from Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School says marijuana increases the risk of having a heart attack within the first hour of smoking to five times that of non-smokers.

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Blessed, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Delicious, Eat Healthy, Family Tradition, Food, Food Is Thy Medicine, Foodie, Inflammation, Lemon, Life, Parsley, Pasta, Recipes, Uncategorized, Vegetables

Pasta and Chimichurri Sauce

I love to cook. But sometimes when your not feeling up to par I like something healthy and fast without ordering take out.

This dish is on the table in no time.

Enjoy

Pasta and Chimichurri

16oz angel hair pasta

Sauce

1 1/2 cup parsley

2 fresh basil leaves

4 cloves garlic

Juice of half a lemon (1-2 tbsp)

1 cup olive oil

2 tsp crushed red pepper flakes

½ tsp ground black pepper

Salt to taste

Parmesan for topping (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a large pot of salted water, cook pasta 1 minute less than package instructions

2. Drain pasta

3. In a food processor, combine parsley, basil,, garlic, lemon juice, red pepper flakes and olive oil until a pesto-like sauce forms.

4. Put pasta back in (slightly cooled) pot and pour 1/4 cup sauce over the pasta. Toss with tongs until evenly coated.Add more if required.

5. Add salt and pepper to taste and toss.

6. Top with parmesan, if desired.

Store any unused sauce in frig in airtight mason jar. Store up to 2 weeks

Sauce can also be used on chicken, turkey ,beef,fish or shrimp as a marinade.

I also make my sauce the day before so flavors get in the oil.

Tip when I would use on steak or chicken with a twist I also would add 1 roasted jalapeño and also add 1 handful of cilantro to above mixture.

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Delicious, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Flush not Blush, Foodie, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, Life, OA, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, Positivity, Uncategorized

Basics To Use Food As Thy Medicine

The few basics you need to know to help pain management due to chronic inflammation with food .

1. Eat the rainbow: Consume 10-12 servings of vegetables each day , and make a couple of those servings fruit, if you like.

2. Cruciferous veggies such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower are best.

3. Restrict dairy and grains: Eat dairy products in limited quantities. When choosing grains, stay away from simple carbohydrates with refined sugar.

4. Opt for whole grains, including barley, buckwheat, oats, quinoa, brown rice, rye, spelt and wheat.

5. Avoid red meat: Eat red meat the way most of us eat turkey right now a few times a year. Have it on very special occasions, very infrequently. Instead, include fish as the “meat” or eat vegetarian main dishes. Chicken is neutral not harmful but not beneficial in the anti-inflammatory sense.

Get down to your ideal weight; weight loss on its own is anti-inflammatory.

Get daily exercise in the form of walking.

Manage your stress.

It is the overall diet and lifestyle and not just the individual foods, that control inflammation.

“For a chronic pain patient like me who was suffering, I went slightly extreme form of the diet so that was no red meat, no flour or sugar or simple carbohydrate and no dairy.

I did that for a month.

I do eat chicken or tuna once a week now. Beef maybe every other month.

I listen to what my body is saying now.

Before I just planned dinner and we ate whatever. It was delicious then but it was all the wrong foods or to much of them and not enough good clean healthy living food.

Now we eat for life.

#EatForLife

More ways to help chronic inflammation is to exercise. I know it’s hard when your in pain. But our body’s were meant to move. We have to move.

Exercise is an added benefit, particularly if people are overweight. “If there is any extra weight, you will need to try to lose it, I’m in that boat also. I need to drop a good 40lbs . But when I was first diagnosed with all these bones issues I was in so much pain I couldn’t move. I could barely think and function.

Ultimately, what we all need to know is that inflammation comes from a biochemical reaction initiated by your immune system or wound-healing coagulation system.

Specific foods can promote or shut down the inflammatory cycle.

For instance, simple carbohydrates like cakes,pies,sugar,chips,crisps,promote it, while good clean carbohydrates like fruits vegetables shut it down.

Don’t be afraid of carbohydrates just eat the good healthy ones 85 percent of the time then you can indulge now and then in a piece of pie.

Nutrition that supports a lifestyle rich in anti-inflammatory foods is the key to anti-inflammation and chronic pain management,

Although there are no magic foods, putting the right combination of foods into your diet can produce remarkable results.

I never knew until I took a class you should never really eat meat and potatoes together at a meal.

And it’s best to eat your fresh fruit by itself as a mid day snack.

Now let’s talk nightshades

I love many of them and eat them often and it doesn’t make my pain worse.

Nightshade vegetables are members of the Solanaceae family of flowering plants. Most nightshade plants aren’t edible such as tobacco and the deadly herb, belladonna.

A handful of nightshade vegetables, however, are edible and well-known staples in our diets, including:

tomatoes

eggplant

potatoes

peppers

All nightshade plants contain compounds called alkaloids. One alkaloid found in nightshade vegetables, solanine, may be toxic in large quantities or in a green potato. There’s no evidence solanine is harmful in typical food amounts. And solanine isn’t only found in nightshades—blueberries, huckleberries, and artichokes contain it, too.

Thanks to anecdotal evidence, nightshade vegetables have earned a bad reputation for causing inflammation in the body.

But not everyone with painful joints who eliminates nightshades from their diet experiences pain relief and some evidence suggests that the nutrition content of nightshades may help with arthritis symptoms.

What the research says about nightshade vegetables and arthritis

According to the Arthritis Foundation, the belief that eating nightshade vegetables worsens arthritis is a myth. They claim people with arthritis may benefit from the high nutrition content in nightshades.

For example, researchers in one 2011 study found that inflammation and DNA damage was reduced in healthy men who ate yellow or purple potatoes, which are nightshade vegetables, for six weeks.

Health benefits of popular nightshades

Most nightshade vegetables contain an abundance of nutrients. They’re also readily-available and easy-to-prepare. In some cases, the benefits of eating nightshade vegetables may outweigh any inflammation risk.

1. Peppers

Peppers, including bell peppers and chili peppers, are low in fat and calories.

They’re a good source of nutrients such as:

vitamin C

fiber

vitamin K

B vitamins

The capsaicin in chili peppers may relieve arthritis pain by reducing a specific pain transmitter in your nerves called Substance P. Capsaicin, which is a common ingredient in many pain-relieving creams. It may cause mild burning or a skin reaction when applied topically.

2. Potatoes

The white potato often gets a bad rap because it’s a starchy carb, but all varieties of potatoes are nutritionally-dense. They can be a part of a healthy diet when eaten in moderation and not fried or slathered in butter and sour cream.

Potatoes are fat-free and a good source of fiber. Fiber helps to keep you fuller longer so you may eat less. Since they contain sodium and potassium, potatoes also help keep your electrolytes in balance.

They’re also a good source of:

vitamin C

vitamin B6

niacin

manganese

iron

copper

folate

The healthiest potato is a baked potato. Add herbs and a dollop of Greek yogurt instead of butter and sour cream. Don’t be shy about trying different varieties, especially since pigmented potatoes may give you an anti-inflammatory bang for your buck.

3. Tomatoes

Technically, tomatoes aren’t a vegetable; they’re a fruit. They contain all four of the carotenoid antioxidants, which include:

lycopene

beta-carotene

alpha-carotene

lutein

Lycopene is the most powerful carotenoid. It’s thought to help prevent some types of cancer, help prevent heart disease, and boost immunity. Some research has shown tomatoes have anti-inflammatory abilities, although more research is needed. 

Tomatoes are a good source of:

vitamin E

vitamin A

potassium

calcium

vitamin K

vitamin B

Add fresh, diced tomatoes to a green salad or make fresh tomato juice. Tomatoes are delicious in vegetable soup and chili, too.

4. Eggplant

Like tomatoes, eggplant is also a fruit. It has no fat or cholesterol. Eggplant isn’t high in any one vitamin or mineral, but it contains small amounts of most essential vitamins and minerals.

According to one 2015 study, eggplant stalk extract may help reduce inflammation. More research is needed to determine if eggplant fruit has the same abilities.

To enjoy eggplant in your diet, go beyond a fat- and calorie-laden eggplant Parmesan casserole. Instead, try sprinkling sliced eggplant with olive oil and herbs, then roasting or grilling. You can also steam eggplant, or add sautéed slices to your favorite veggie pizza.

This is not medical advice this is based on how I eat to help my pain.

As well as just a few studies showing how good food is.

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Ancestry, Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Baking, Blessed, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Delicious, Desserts, Eat Healthy, Food, Foodie, Hacks, Homegrown, Inflammation, Pain, Plant, Recipes, Stevia, Sugar Alternative

I Started To Cut Out Added Sugar & Use This: Homemade Stevia Liquid

We have to cut out all the added sugar or try to cut back at least !!

It is no secret that people today ingest far too much sugar. According to the NHS, adults should not be consuming more than 30g of added sugars per day.

But we consume 3x that amount !

It’s no wonder why were becoming fat

and unhealthy

In 1700, the average person consumed approximately 4.9 grams of sugar each day (1.81 kg per year). That’s about 1 teaspoon.

·         In 1800, the average person consumed approximately 22.4 grams of sugar each day (10.2 kg per year). That’s about 5 teaspoons

·         In 1900, the average person consumed approximately 112 grams of sugar each day (40.8 kg per year). That’s 28 teaspoons

·         In 2009, 50 per cent of Americans consumed approximately 227 grams of sugar each day – equating to 81.6 kg per year. That’s almost 58 teaspoons !!!

We wonder why we’re sick! And living with chronic pain.

I mean it’s in everything. From Cookies where we expect it to me to tomato sauce and yogurt. Things you never would expect to have sugar and it’s causing us to be fat and unhealthy and full of inflammation.

I’m trying to cut out added sugar and it was very hard.

Once you get past a few weeks you will feel better.

Food tastes better also and coffee does to .

I do use hazelnut coffee mate . And I’m not going to lie I still will eat a couple chips ahoy thin cookies or a mini cupcake or two now and then.

But I am really trying to get off the sugar. I have to admit it’s harder than when I stopped smoking.

I have learned through my herbology classes how to make my own liquid stevia.

And it’s helped me cut back a lot on the sugar. I just can’t drink things like tea without some sweetness in it.

So now actually make my own Stevia extract and dilute it, and other Stevia liquid flavor it etc..

I learned a lot in the herbology classes I take.

I buy all my herbs from mountains rose herbs.

I also just put the dry leaves in a beverage hot or cold.

I stopped buying Stevia at the store.

Also raw honey is good to use as a substitute.

Anything processed with a strange chemical or an artificial ingredients added is never good.

You can use fresh stevia leaves as a sweetener in beverages, such as tea and lemonade, or in sauces. A few fresh stevia and mint leaves make a great herbal tea when steeped in a cup of boiling water.

Add fresh stevia leaves to beverages or foods as a sweet, edible garnish. Although the fresh leaves are less sweet than dried leaves, they’re still much sweeter than sugar. Taste-test your beverage before serving to ensure you don’t over-sweeten your drink.

Use dry stevia leaves to make a powdered sweetener. Bundle and hang fresh stevia plant stems upside down in a warm, dry location until the leaves are thoroughly dry, then strip the leaves from the stems.

Fill a blender, food processor or coffee grinder to half full with dry leaves and process at high speed for a few seconds.

Store the powdered sweetener in an airtight container. Use the powder in recipes that call for a sweetener, but make adjustments in the amount used due to its dense sweetness.

A general rule of thumb is that 2 to 3 tablespoons of stevia powder equals 1 cup of sugar.

Use dry stevia leaves to make a syrup for sweetening beverages, sauces or other syrups. Add one cup of warm water to one-quarter cup of fresh, finely crushed stevia leaves.

Put the mixture in an airtight container and allow it to set for 24 hours before straining the leaves from the mixture. You can cook the strained mixture on low heat, reducing it to a more concentrated syrup. The syrup should last for several years, if kept in an airtight container in your refrigerator.

Things You Will Need

* Blender

* Measuring cups

* Strainer

* Airtight container

• Glass amber color and dropper

I also make my own liquid stevia extract for baking etc…

Stevia extract recipe.

Vodka

Organic Stevia Leafs Dried

Glass mason jar

Fill a clean glass jar 1/4 to 1/3 full with stevia leaf. Cover the herb with vodka and pour to the very top. Allow to steep for 24-48 hours, taking care not to let it extract any longer than that to avoid bitterness. Strain and bottle it in a dark amber glass dropper bottle.

Vanilla Stevia Extract Recipe

Chop 1 vanilla bean and add to strained stevia extract. Allow to infuse for 2 to 6 weeks. Strain and bottle it in an amber bottle with dropper.

Lemon Stevia Extract

Fill your jar 1/3 full with organic lemon peel

Cover completely with strained stevia extract.

Allow to infuse for 1 to 4 weeks, tasting along the way. Strain and bottle in amber glass bottle with dropper

HOW TO USE HOMEMADE STEVIA EXTRACT

Add 1-2 drops to your favorite beverages (I especially love using homemade stevia extract to sweeten my coffee or tea!) A little bit goes a long way, so start with small amounts.

I found I had  to use a bit more of my homemade stevia to get the desired level of sweetness, as compared to the store-bought stevia I’ve tried.

But I think the sweetness will depends on how long you heated the extract and how many leaves you used.

This is a Stevia Plant.

Your dry stevia leaves can be used to make a healthy syrup for sweetening beverages, sauces, or even other syrups. A teaspoon of stevia syrup is as sweet as a cup of sugar.

Take 2 cups of warm water and add it to half a cup of dried stevia leaves.  Put the mixture in a glass jar and let it steep for 24 hours. Strain the leaves from the mixture.

Cook the strained mixture on low heat, reducing it to a concentrated syrup. The syrup should last for at least a year if kept in an airtight container in your refrigerator.

Conversion chart

1 cup of sugar is equal to – 1 teaspoon of stevia leaf powder or 1 teaspoon of stevia extract.

1 tablespoon of sugar is equal to – .25 teaspoon of stevia powder or 6-9 drops of stevia extract.

1 teaspoon of sugar is equal to – a pinch of stevia powder or 2-4 drops of stevia extract.

Stevia is becoming a popular plant and is readily available at most local nurseries.

If grown inside or outside it will flourish.

Thankfully it has few pests and is easy to grow and preserve.

Now that you know how to use it, you be adding stevia to your garden or window seal.

Another Recipe

Extract

With Alcohol cooked off.

• 1 glass jar with a tight fitting lid

• Dried Stevia leaves. They can be crumbled, chopped or powdered

• Vodka or Rum

Using a ratio of 2 parts stevia to 3 parts liquid, place one cup of stevia in the jar and cover it with 1.5 cups of alcohol.

Shake the mixture well and let it sit for no more than 36 hours. (it will become bitter if you steep it longer than 36 hours) Strain through muslin or a coffee filter and pour the tincture into a dark colored bottle.

To remove the alcohol: once the 36 hours are up, simmer the mixture on low heat for 30 minutes, stirring regularly.

Be careful not to boil.  When it cools, strain and bottle as above.

This mixture should be kept in the refrigerator, where it will store for six months.

.

.

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Baking, Blessed, Bone Health, Breakthrough Crew, BreakThroughCrew, Candy, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Clinical Trials, Croatian Family, Delicious, Desserts, Diagnosed, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, Endocrinologist, Factor V Leiden, Family Tradition, Opinions, Thoughts, Uncategorized

Blogs

I think I will be starting a new blog just for recipes

Opinions? I really want your opinions

Since I am a health leader and advocate who lives with several chronic conditions

Should I focus on just that or have a mix

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Diagnosed, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Flush not Blush, Food, Homemade Syrups,Tinctures,Rubs, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, OA, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, Positivity, Rosacea, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Support Group, Hope, Uncategorized, Vegetables, Vision, WegoHealth

I Am A Patient Leader to Help and Empower Others ~ WEGOHealth Awards 2017

 I would really appreciate your vote. Please read my story and why I became a patient leader and advocate. ThankYou.

I am so excited to announce that I have been nominated for several of the WEGO Health Awards in the

6th

Annual WEGO Health Awards.

WEGO Health is a mission driven company connecting healthcare with the experience, skills, and insights of patient leaders. They are the world’s largest network of patient leaders, working across virtually all health conditions and topics.

Click link below to learn more about their

Patient Leader Network.

https://awards.wegohealth.com/nominees/12801

The WEGO Health Awards were created to celebrate those who tirelessly support the mission of WEGO Health: to empower the patient voice.

With 16 award categories, the WEGO Health Awards are the only awards across all conditions and platforms, that recognize the over 100,000 yep one hundred thousand inspiring Patient Leaders who raise awareness, share information, and support their communities but often without recognition.

I was diagnosed with osteonecrosis also known as avascular necrosis in late 2014. I was told it was due to the trauma I suffered to my knee(medial meniscus tear)

I remember how I felt, I remember how afraid I was and also a feeling of hopelessness.

If doctors couldn’t help or fix me or even try what was I to do.

I never want anyone to feel that way starving for answers to questions about a new diagnosis and no place to go and no one willing to take the time to explain your new diagnosis. I new others had to be feeling the same way as I was and what an awful feeling that was . Sure I have support from my family but they don’t really understand the pain no one can unless you have it.

So I started the support group Avascular Necrosis/Osteonecrosis Support Int’l to be a safe haven if you will, for anyone that suffers from the disease. On occasion we also allow a family member in the group if the member is comfortable with that so they can also see how this disease/disorder effects people, so they can learn from awareness and education, to have an idea just the type of pain their family member has.

The physical and psychological effects can be debilitating and isolating. Especially when you have what I refer to as a flare up of pain. You can’t plan to go to that wedding next month, you don’t know how you’ll feel in an hour.

The pain can be constant day and night pain or come at any time out of nowhere or in waves and they’re quite perturbing. It’s like a hot lightning bolt and a sledge hammer hitting you at the same time and it can be shocking to those around you,because you end up maybe screaming or yelling,sometimes swearing or just overall mood change because the pain is so intense words truly cannot describe. Some words are hot stabbing shooting debilitating and yet frozen , tourniquet like cutting off your blood supply cold pain that’s what we feel.

Its not just the pain that affects us , but also the sadness or depression that can often come with it. When we think about the future and pain gets in the way of all our plans expectations, it’s a bit shattering.

Everything seems to sort of fall apart and right now you can see only the broken image of the new you .

It’s like looking in a shattered mirror all these different fragments that no longer make you whole.

My life became very fragmented and it was a moment to moment thing because I didn’t know how I would make it through that particular day or make it through what’s going to happen tomorrow. When I was first diagnosed my mind was all over the place.

I’m not terminal but I felt like I was , because my life as I once knew it was done…over.

No doctor I saw had any plan of action to help me in fact I was told we will wait until the joint collapses then replace the knee . Talk about mind blowing!

Osteonecrosis took my career in optical which I loved. It took my hiking in the woods away which I enjoyed. It limits me which I hate. But it’s also given me a new purpose and that is spreading awareness, discussing new treatments, the chance to educate , and reaching out to others. I am a patient leader and activist. Making the invisible, visible

If you allow it, the pain and mental shit you go through when you live in pain and with a rare disorder to boot whether it’s constant or sporadic it can be toxic to the mind and soul sucking.

God forbid don’t ask for pain meds.

When I was first diagnosed my first Ortho said the pain will get intense as if it wasn’t already but I don’t give pain meds. I wondered how bad will it get? I’m already in such pain I can barely stand it. Thankfully my family doctor gave me some pain medicine.

It helped but I don’t want to take it. I’d much rather find out how to fix me.

I’m not some junkie looking for a fix, hell I don’t even want to be at a doctors office.

I would much rather be working or frankly doing anything but sitting in a doctors office.

There is so much stigma that goes along with having chronic pain .

The generalization that everyone is claiming they are in pain just to get drugs is unfair and incorrect, and I think we have to be very careful because pain for most of us is invisible,to others.

When we are out of balance mind ,body , and spirit it makes it so hard to focus.

It makes anything and everything worse.

So we have to change our mind set,respect and do what we can to help our body,and interact with others.

Usually I think people will find that in a support group even if they don’t talk they can listen to people who have the similar experiences, frustrations , challenges,pain, treatments or lack of treatment availability or just simple acknowledgement of I know what your going through, many days is a great help.

And it’s very hard to find that outside a support group.

I never insist a new member speak unless they want to. Some are just so devastated by the diagnosis that they have no words. When I see a new member especially a newly diagnosed one, my heart just knows how much fear they have and how afraid they are. I always let them know that can say anything here and it will remain here. But if they are not ready that’s fine to.

I also offer to send them a copy of a booklet I wrote about avn/on.

I know later their words will come. Right now they need to know they are not alone.

I also raise awareness by several

FB pages

Instagram

Twitter

Personal Blog on word press and blogger

Chronicallygratefuldebla.com

That’s why I am a patient leader and activist.

Here is the link to my WegoHealth profile.

I would appreciate your vote.

You can vote daily up until September 1, 2017.

Here is link

https://awards.wegohealth.com/nominees/12801

Thank you

Current Nominations in The 6th annual WEGO Health Awards

#WEGOHealthAwards

#PatientLeader

Please share this if you would be so kind.

Social Footprint

https://awards.wegohealth.com/nominees/12801

chronicallygratefuldebla.wordpress.com

facebook.com/debbie.briglovichandio

youtube.com/user/debbieandio

twitter.com/debbiea001

instagram.com/debbiea_1962

facebook.com/groups/deadbonediseaseavn

facebook.com/chronicallygrateful.me

facebook.com/avascularnecrosisrarediseasedayfeb29

facebook.com/osteonecrosis-avascular-necrosis-support-913679995417381

facebook.com/onavascular-necrosis-knowledge-752404224891578

facebook.com/yummygoodness

twitter.com/osteonecrosisme

facebook.com/chronicallygrateful.me

facebook.com/morningtalk.health

blogger.com/blogger.g?blogID=4338585393508080811

www.pinterest.com/amp/pin/487444359646285508/

What is osteonecrosis?  The term literally means bone death -osteo =bone necrosis=death.

Posted in Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Diagnosed, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, exercise, Factor V Leiden, Food, Hacks, Happiness, Herbal, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, Music, OA, Osteonecrosis, Positivity, Uncategorized, Vision

Various Relaxation Techniques

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With so much stress that comes with having a chronic condition and the world we live in is full of several fast paced situations , hurry here, hurry there , doctor appointments, tests,people with little to no patience and they want us to move a bit faster!
Excuse You! But I have a bone disease and I am going as fast as I can.
People judging us
It can be overwhelming
It's no wonder at the end of a day we can't sleep.

I think personally everyone needs to learn how to just open our mind relax and chill a little.

Relaxation Techniques
Using the Relaxation Response to Relieve Stress

For many of us, relaxation means zoning out in front of the TV at the end of a stressful day.

But this does little to reduce the damaging effects of stress.

To effectively combat stress, we need to activate the body's natural relaxation response.
You can do this by practicing relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation, rhythmic exercise, and yoga or chair yoga if you are challenged with Bone and joint issues.

Fitting these activities into your life can help reduce everyday stress, boost your energy and mood, and improve your mental and physical health..

What is the relaxation response? Well based on what I have read …
When stress overwhelms your nervous system, your body is flooded with chemicals that prepare you for "fight or flight."
This stress response can be lifesaving in emergency situations where you need to act quickly.
But when it’s constantly activated by the stresses of everyday life, it can wear your body down and take a toll on your emotional health.

No one can avoid all stress, but you can counteract its detrimental effects by learning how to produce the relaxation response, a state of deep rest that is the polar opposite of the stress response. The relaxation response puts the brakes on stress and brings your body and mind back into a state of equilibrium.
When the relaxation response is activated, your:
heart rate slows down
breathing becomes slower and deeper
blood pressure drops or stabilizes
muscles relax
blood flow to the brain increases

In addition to its calming physical effects, the relaxation response also increases energy and focus, combats illness, relieves aches and pains, heightens problem-solving abilities, and boosts motivation and productivity. Best of all, anyone can reap these benefits with regular practice.
How to produce the relaxation response
Simply laying on the couch, reading, or watching TV while sometimes relaxing isn’t going to produce the physical and psychological benefits of the relaxation response. For that, you’ll need to actively practice a relaxation technique.
Finding the relaxation technique that’s best for you may be interesting because there is no single relaxation technique that is best for everyone.
So I am going to touch base on a few and post their YouTube links below.

The right relaxation technique is the one that resonates with you, fits your lifestyle, and is able to focus your mind and interrupt your everyday thoughts to elicit the relaxation response. You may even find that alternating or combining different techniques provide the best results.

How you react to stress may also influence the relaxation technique that works best for you:

The “fight” response. If you tend to become angry, agitated, or keyed up under stress, you will respond best to stress relief activities that quiet you down, such as meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, deep breathing, or guided imagery.
The “flight” response. If you tend to become depressed, withdrawn, or spaced out under stress, you will respond best to stress relief activities that are stimulating and energize your nervous system, such as rhythmic exercise, massage, mindfulness, or power yoga.

The immobilization response. If you’ve experienced some type of trauma and tend to “freeze” or become “stuck” under stress, your challenge is to first rouse your nervous system to a fight or flight response (above) so you can employ the applicable stress relief techniques.
To do this, choose physical activity that engages both your arms and legs, such as running, dancing, or tai chi, and perform it mindfully, focusing on the sensations in your limbs as you move.

Deep breathing
With its focus on full, cleansing breaths, deep breathing is a simple yet powerful relaxation technique. It’s easy to learn, can be practiced almost anywhere, and provides a quick way to get your stress levels in check. Deep breathing is the cornerstone of many other relaxation practices, too, and can be combined with other relaxing elements such as aromatherapy and music. All you really need is a few minutes and a place to stretch out.
How to practice deep breathing
The key to deep breathing is to breathe deeply from the abdomen, getting as much fresh air as possible in your lungs. When you take deep breaths from the abdomen, rather than shallow breaths from your upper chest, you inhale more oxygen. The more oxygen you get, the less tense, short of breath, and anxious you feel.
Sit comfortably with your back straight. Put one hand on your chest and the other on your stomach.
Breathe in through your nose. The hand on your stomach should rise. The hand on your chest should move very little.
Exhale through your mouth, pushing out as much air as you can while contracting your abdominal muscles. The hand on your stomach should move in as you exhale, but your other hand should move very little.
Continue to breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth. Try to inhale enough so that your lower abdomen rises and falls. Count slowly as you exhale.

If you find it difficult breathing from your abdomen while sitting up, try lying down. Put a small book on your stomach, and breathe so that the book rises as you inhale and falls as you exhale.

Progressive muscle relaxation
Progressive muscle relaxation is a two-step process in which you systematically tense and relax different muscle groups in the body. With regular practice, it gives you an intimate familiarity with what tension as well as complete relaxation feels like in different parts of the body. This can help you to you react to the first signs of the muscular tension that accompanies stress. And as your body relaxes, so will your mind.

Progressive muscle relaxation can be combined with deep breathing for additional stress relief.
Practicing progressive muscle relaxation
Consult with your doctor first if you have a history of muscle spasms, back problems, or other serious injuries that may be aggravated by tensing muscles.
Start at your feet and work your way up to your face, trying to only tense those muscles intended.
1. Loosen clothing, take off your shoes, and get comfortable.
2. Take a few minutes to breathe in and out in slow, deep breaths.
3. When you’re ready, shift your attention to your right foot. Take a moment to focus on the way it feels.
4. Slowly tense the muscles in your right foot, squeezing as tightly as you can. Hold for a count of 10.
5. Relax your foot. Focus on the tension flowing away and how your foot feels as it becomes limp and loose.
6. Stay in this relaxed state for a moment, breathing deeply and slowly.
7. Shift your attention to your left foot. Follow the same sequence of muscle tension and release.
8. Move slowly up through your body, contracting and relaxing the different muscle groups.
9. It may take some practice at first, but try not to tense muscles other than those intended.

Mindfulness meditation
Rather than worrying about the future or dwelling on the past, mindfulness meditation switches the focus to what’s happening right now, enabling you to be fully engaged in the present moment.

Meditations that cultivate mindfulness have long been used to reduce stress, anxiety, depression, and other negative emotions. Some of these meditations bring you into the present by focusing your attention on a single repetitive action, such as your breathing, a few repeated words, or the flickering light of a candle. Other forms of mindfulness meditation encourage you to follow and then release internal thoughts or sensations. Mindfulness can also be applied to activities such as walking, exercising, or eating.
A basic mindfulness exercise:
1. Sit on a straight-backed chair or cross-legged on the floor.
2. Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling.
3. Once you've narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations, and thoughts.
4. Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.

Body scan meditation
This is a type of meditation that that focuses your attention on various parts of your body. Like progressive muscle relaxation, you start with your feet and work your way up. But instead of tensing and relaxing muscles, you simply focus on the way each part of your body feels, without labeling the sensations as either “good” or “bad”.
Practicing body scan meditation
Lie on your back, legs uncrossed, arms relaxed at your sides, eyes open or closed. Focus on your breathing for about two minutes until you start to feel relaxed.
Turn your focus to the toes of your right foot. Notice any sensations you feel while continuing to also focus on your breathing. Imagine each deep breath flowing to your toes. Remain focused on this area for one to two minutes.
Move your focus to the sole of your right foot. Tune in to any sensations you feel in that part of your body and imagine each breath flowing from the sole of your foot. After one or two minutes, move your focus to your right ankle and repeat. Move to your calf, knee, thigh, hip, and then repeat the sequence for your left leg. From there, move up the torso, through the lower back and abdomen, the upper back and chest, and the shoulders. Pay close attention to any area of the body that causes you pain or discomfort.
After completing the body scan, relax for a while in silence and stillness, noting how your body feels. Then slowly open your eyes and stretch, if necessary.
Rhythmic movement and mindful exercise
The idea of exercising may not sound particularly soothing, but rhythmic exercise that gets you into a flow of repetitive movement can be very relaxing. Examples include:
Running
Walking
Swimming
Dancing
Rowing
Climbing
For maximum stress relief, add mindfulness to your workout
While simply engaging in rhythmic exercise will help you relieve stress, if you add a mindfulness component on top, you’ll get even more benefit.
As with meditation, mindful exercise requires being fully engaged in the present moment—paying attention to how your body feels right now, rather than your daily worries or concerns. In order to “turn off” your thoughts, focus on the sensations in your limbs and how your breathing complements your movement.
If you’re walking or running, for example, focus on the sensation of your feet touching the ground, the rhythm of your breath, and the feeling of the wind against your face. If your mind wanders to other thoughts, gently return to focusing on your breathing and movement.
Visualization
Visualization, or guided imagery, is a variation on traditional meditation that involves imagining a scene in which you feel at peace, free to let go of all tension and anxiety. Choose whatever setting is most calming to you, whether it’s a tropical beach, a favorite childhood spot, or a quiet wooded glen.
You can practice visualization on your own or with a therapist (or an audio recording of a therapist) guiding you through the imagery. You can also choose to do your visualization in silence or use listening aids, such as soothing music or a sound machine or recording that matches your chosen setting—the sound of ocean waves if you’ve chosen a beach, for example.
Practicing visualization
Close your eyes and imagine your restful place. Picture it as vividly as you can—everything you can see, hear, smell, taste, and feel. Just “looking” at it like you would a photograph is not enough. Visualization works best if you incorporate as many sensory details as possible.
For example, if you are thinking about a dock on a quiet lake:
See the sun setting over the water
Hear the birds singing
Smell the pine trees
Feel the cool water on your bare feet
Taste the fresh, clean air
Enjoy the feeling of your worries drifting away as you slowly explore your restful place. When you are ready, gently open your eyes and come back to the present.
Don't worry if you sometimes zone out or lose track of where you are during a visualization session. This is normal. You may also experience feelings of heaviness in your limbs, muscle twitches, or yawning. Again, these are normal responses.
Yoga and tai chi
Yoga involves a series of both moving and stationary poses, combined with deep breathing. As well as reducing anxiety and stress, yoga can also improve flexibility, strength, balance, and stamina. Since injuries can happen when yoga is practiced incorrectly, it’s best to learn by attending group classes, hiring a private teacher, or at least following video instructions. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others, tailoring your practice as you see fit.

If you’re unsure whether a specific yoga class is appropriate for stress relief, call the studio or ask the teacher.
Tai chi
If you’ve seen a group of people in the park slowly moving in synch, you’ve probably witnessed tai chi. Tai chi is a self-paced, non-competitive series of slow, flowing body movements. By focusing your mind on the movements and your breathing, you keep your attention on the present, which clears the mind and leads to a relaxed state.
Tai chi is a safe, low-impact option for people of all ages and fitness levels, including older adults and those recovering from injuries. As with yoga, it's best learned in a class or from a private instructor. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others.
Self-massage
You’re probably already aware how much a professional massage at a spa or health club can help reduce stress, relieve pain, and ease muscle tension. What you may not be aware of is that you can experience many of the same benefits at home or work by practicing self-massage—or trading massages with a loved one.
Try taking a few minutes to massage yourself at your desk between tasks, on the couch at the end of a hectic day, or in bed to help you unwind before sleep. To enhance relaxation, you can use aromatic oil, scented lotion, or combine self-message with mindfulness or deep breathing techniques.

Starting a regular relaxation practice
Learning the basics of these relaxation techniques isn’t difficult, but it takes regular practice to truly harness their stress-relieving power. Most stress experts recommend setting aside at least 10 to 20 minutes a day for your relaxation practice. If you’d like to maximize the benefits, aim for 30 minutes to an hour.
Tips for making relaxation techniques part of your life
Set aside time in your daily schedule. If possible, schedule a set time once or twice a day for your practice. If your schedule is already packed, remember that many relaxation techniques can be practiced while you’re doing other things. Try meditating while commuting on the bus or train, taking a yoga or tai chi break at lunchtime, or practicing mindful walking while exercising your dog.
Don't practice when you're sleepy. These techniques are so relaxing that they can make you very sleepy. However, you will get the most benefit if you practice when you’re fully alert. Avoid practicing close to bedtime or after a heavy meal or alcohol.
Expect ups and downs. Don’t be discouraged if you skip a few days or even a few weeks. Just get started again and slowly build up to your old momentum.
If you exercise, improve the relaxation benefits by adopting mindfulness. Instead of zoning out or staring at a TV as you exercise, try focusing your attention on your body. If you’re resistance training, for example, focus on coordinating your breathing with your movements and pay attention to how your body feels as you raise and lower weights.

Here is a few links I use to
relax
reduce pain
help me sleep better

These are my favorites and I listen to it daily and a few I listen to now and then

Daily
Mindfulness
https://youtu.be/-2zdUXve6fQ

Stress Relief and Confidence
https://youtu.be/-KMngzCWgTw

Morning Meditation for Healing
https://youtu.be/q9ZR_CJhuLc

Reiki for pain relief
https://youtu.be/3nJtajgAb34

Relax Video Male Voice
https://youtu.be/_jD3VxSGM-k

https://youtu.be/oA_rY4N8XJA

Sounds for Anxiety depression
https://youtu.be/AmqDOA-JALg

Meditation Sounds for pain relief
https://youtu.be/XiNne25uMK8

To help you sleep
https://youtu.be/xQ6xgDI7Whc

Disclaimer
Usage Policy

The information provided on this website is for educational purposes only. By using the website you are participating at your own risk.
• Make sure you practise with enough free space around you. Wear comfortable clothing so you can move freely.
• Please take responsibility for your own body and include extra warm up and cool down stretches where appropriate.
• You should avoid alcohol and drugs before yoga and meditation. Also no heavy meals for two hours before practice. Keep yourself hydrated before and after your yoga practice.
• If you feel dizzy, light-headed, faint, or if you experience any other discomfort, stop exercising immediately and consult a medical doctor. You are responsible for your condition during your practice. Exercise within your limits. Never force or strain. Seek attention and advice as appropriate.
• We offer no medical advice. You should consult a medical practitioner before starting any new exercise regime. This is particularly important if you are overweight, pregnant, nursing, regularly taking medications, or have any existing medical conditions. This website may not be tailored to your current physical and mental health. We accept no liability whatsoever for any damages arising from the use of this website.
• We do not recommend that you attempt any of this or yoga exercises for the first time without suitable experience or supervision.
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Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Diagnosed, DNA, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Happiness, Homemade Syrups,Tinctures,Rubs, Inflammation, Mindfulness, OA, Osteonecrosis, Positivity, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Support Group, Hope, Uncategorized, WegoHealth

~Health  Awards ~ Advocate Nominee 

I was notified about a month ago I was nominated for a few awards in a few categories for awareness I vowed when diagnosed with avn /on I would never want anyone to feel as alone and scared as I did in 2014. 

https://awards.wegohealth.com/nominees/12801

My Ortho who diagnosed me really never took the time to even explain to me what I had, or come up with any positive plan of action. He did say when I asked when the plan was …..we will wait until your knee collapses and the replace it !!

Are you frickin kidding me!! That was his plan of action.

Well thank god my knee still is hanging in there and no sign of collapse and when it does happen if that happens he won't be doing surgery.

After the initial shock and grief I went through for what my life was and what may now be I vowed to be a world changer The Ortho also failed to tell me how rare this is and when I did my own research and found out how rare it was rare, it  left me feeling even more alone.

Sure my husband was and family were supportive but they had no clue what I had 

I also have a few other medical issues 

Osteoarthritis Spondylolisthesis Hypothyroidism , Factor V, Rbbb.

And I advocate for all and then some. 
I don't want anyone who was diagnosed with anything to ever feel alone. 

But when you have an orphan disease it just makes it harder some days to deal with. 

It's not like heart disease or cancer where there is constant education, awareness and research being done. 

I hope to change that. Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis had no cause ribbon so I made them, designed them. Now we have one

There was little information I changed that, I wrote a booklet for patients who have or are just diagnosed with Avascular Necrosis/Osteonecrosis 

I stay up to date on new treatments, trials

I also compiled an ongoing list of doctors not just locally but world wide who are knowledgeable in Avascular Necrosis/Osteonecrosis.

I am so honored to have been nominated 

I was nominated for 8 or 9 different categories and I am asking for your support(vote).

I would greatly appreciate it. 

Also there are so many other wonderful nominees maybe you could also give them a vote as well
Here is how it works 

Click below link

You will come to my wegohealth leader profile 

When you click endorse you will have the option to share it you don't have to but thanks if you do. 

It will then take you back to endorse screen so you can vote for the next award I am nominated for. 
As an advocate for Osteonecrosis and a few others things, like Osteoarthritis,Spondylolisthesis,Hypothyroidism, Heart Disease I take pride in all the research I do to raise awareness. 


I am a voice and resource in a rare community for those of us who are suffering with Avascular Necrosis/Osteonecrosis the orphan disease most people have never heard of unless your diagnosed.
I have the honor this year again of being nominated for many of the categories 16 health awards this year as a member of wegohealth.

Thank You In Advance. 

https://awards.wegohealth.com/nominees/12801

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Blessed, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, family, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, OA, Osteonecrosis, Osteoporosis, Rare Disease Day, Rheumatoid Arthritis, StopTheClot, Uncategorized

Nothing Is Useless

When the body is falling apart. And you feel like you have nothing of value to offer God or anyone else. 

Think again. 
Below is a post from Our Daily Bread
Nothing Is Useless June 12, 2017  

from Our Daily Bread
Read: 1 Corinthians 15:42–58 

“Nothing you do for the Lord is ever useless.” 

1 Corinthians 15:58 
‘Nothing Is Useless’

A Story of Hope and Encouragement 

In my third year battling discouragement and depression caused by limited mobility and chronic pain, I confided to a friend, “My body’s falling apart. I feel like I have nothing of value to offer God or anyone else.”
Her hand rested on mine. “Would you say it doesn’t make a difference when I greet you with a smile or listen to you? Would you tell me it’s worthless when I pray for you or offer a kind word?”
Do what you can with what you have and leave the results to God. I settled into my recliner. “Of course not.”
She frowned. “Then why are you telling yourself those lies? You do all those things for me and for others.”
I thanked God for reminding me that nothing we do for Him is useless.
In 1 Corinthians 15, Paul assures us that our bodies may be weak now but they will be “raised in power” (v. 43). Because God promises we’ll be resurrected through Christ, we can trust Him to use every offering, every small effort done for Him, to make a difference in His kingdom (v. 58).
Even when we’re physically limited, a smile, a word of encouragement, a prayer, or a display of faith during our trial can be used to minister to the diverse and interdependent body of Christ. When we serve the Lord, no job or act of love is too menial to matter.
Jesus, thank You for valuing us and using us to build up others.
Do what you can with what you have and leave the results to God.

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Diagnosed, DNA, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, family, Inflammation, Jamberry Nails, Laparoscopic Surgery, Life, OA, Osteonecrosis, Rare Disease Day, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Uncategorized, WegoHealth

If you like my logo I’d appreciate a vote 

I just entered a  contest; help me get to the top of the leaderboard! 

I have Avascular Necrosis/ Osteonecrosis and the condition/disease is rare, so rare there was no cause ribbon for anyone to identify with. 

I created a few varieties and now the AVN community finally has a ribbon. 

My goal is to educate and provide hope and support to anyone suffering from this condition.
Mine was caused by trauma to the knee (medial meniscus tear) in 2014. 

So what is Avascular Necrosis? 

Avascular necrosis (AVN), also called osteonecrosis, aseptic necrosis, or ischemic bone necrosis, is a condition that occurs when there is loss of blood to the bone. Because bone is living tissue that requires blood, an interruption to the blood supply causes bone to die. If not stopped, this process eventually causes the bone to collapse.
Avascular necrosis most commonly occurs in the hip. Other common sites are the shoulder, knees, shoulder, and ankles. But AVN can attack any bone or joint anytime and age is not a factor 

Who Gets Avascular Necrosis and What Causes It?
As many as 20,000 people develop AVN each year. Most are between ages 20 and 50.  But young children are also affected it’s called Leg Calves Perthes 

For healthy people, the risk of AVN is smaller than someone with an underlying cause.  

Most cases are the result of an underlying health problem or injury. Possible causes include:

Dislocation or fracture of the thigh bone (femur). Tear in meniscus, tear in shoulder, etc…

This type of injury can affect the blood supply to the bone, leading to trauma-related avascular necrosis. AVN may develop in 20% or more of people who dislocate a hip.

Chronic corticosteroid use. Long-term use of these inflammation-fighting drugs, either orally or intravenously, is associated with 35% of all cases of nontraumatic AVN. 

Although the reason for this is not completely understood, doctors suspect these drugs may interfere with the body’s ability to break down fatty substances. These substances collect in the blood vessels making them narrower  and reduce the amount of blood to the bone.

Excessive alcohol use. Much like corticosteroids, excessive alcohol may cause fatty substances to build in the blood vessels and decrease the blood supply to the bones.
Blood clots, inflammation, and damage to the arteries. All of these can block blood flow to the bones.
Other conditions associated with nontraumatic AVN include:
Gaucher’s disease, an inherited metabolic disorder in which harmful quantities of a fatty substance accumulate in the organs

Sickle cell disease

Pancreatitis, inflammation of the pancreas

HIV infection

Radiation therapy or chemotherapy

Autoimmune diseases

Decompression sickness, a condition that occurs when the body is subjected to a sudden reduction in surrounding pressure, causing the formation of gas bubbles in the blood

Symptoms of Avascular Necrosis

In its early stages, AVN typically cause no symptoms; however, as the disease progresses it becomes painful. At first, you may experience pain when you put pressure on the affected bone. Then, pain may become more constant. If the disease progresses and the bone and surrounding joint collapse, you may experience severe pain that interferes with your ability to use your joint. The time between the first symptoms and collapse of the bone may range from several months to more than a year.
Treatment for Avascular Necrosis
The goals of treatment for AVN are to improve or ensure function of the affected joint, stop the progression of bone damage, and reduce pain.
The best treatment will depend on a number of factors, including:
Your age

Stage of the disease

Location and amount of bone damage

Cause of AVN

If the cause of your avascular necrosis is identified, treatment will include efforts to manage the underlying condition. For example, if AVN is caused by blood clots, your doctor will prescribe medications to dissolve clots. If inflammation of the arteries is responsible, your doctor may prescribe anti-inflammatory medicines.
If avascular necrosis is caught early, treatment may involve taking medications to relieve pain or limiting the use of the affected area. If your hip, knee, or ankle is affected, crutches may be necessary to take weight off the damaged joint. Your doctor may also recommend range-of-motion exercises to help keep the affected joint mobile.
While these nonsurgical treatments may slow the progression of avascular necrosis, most people with the condition eventually need surgery.
Surgical options include:
Bone grafts, which involve removing healthy bone from one part of the body and using it to replace the damaged bone

Osteotomy, a procedure that involves cutting the bone and changing its alignment to relieve stress on the bone or joint

Total joint replacement, which involves removing the damaged joint and replacing it with a synthetic joint

Core decompression, a procedure that involves removing part of the inside of the bone to relieve pressure and allow new blood vessels to form

Vascularized bone graft, a procedure that uses the patient’s own tissue to rebuild diseased or damaged hip joints; the surgeon first removes the bone with the poor blood supply from the hip and then replaces it with the blood-vessel-rich bone from another site, such as the fibula, the smaller bone located in the lower leg.
Link 
http://s.heyo.com/63eaad?media=54ef7658-1bbb-4e5d-865e-dfc25fb4bbb6