Posted in Arthritis, Chronic Pain, Pain

Not All Pain is Created Equal

Not All Pain is Created Equal

When we hear the word arthritis, we think of our grandparents talking about their joint aches. We had no idea it could happen to children and people of all ages.

There are more than 100 types of arthritis and related diseases, and not all arthritis pain is alike. It can originate in different areas of our body, triggering chemical and electrical signals that move from the area of pain or injury up to brain and back to let us know that hurt

I have a high tolerance for pain so when I am hurting, I know it’s bad. Everyone’s threshold and tolerance for pain is unique. Then, there are days I bump my hand or arm and I see stars. I just don’t understand it….

Living and coping with chronic pain can be the hardest part of living with a joint disease. It can disrupt every part of our life and many parts of your life can also affect your pain.

Facts on Pain

  • As many as 75 percent of those 65 and older report persistent pain from arthritis and other chronic conditions.
  • Almost four out of five older adults have multiple chronic conditions besides arthritis, like diabetes, heart disease and obesity. And the combination can heighten pain and discomfort.
  • Women are more likely to develop chronic pain and often feel pain more intensely than men.
  • In the United States, 23% of all adults—over 54 million people—have arthritis. About 24 million adults are limited in their activities from arthritis, and more than 1 in 4 adults with arthritis report severe joint pain

National Prevalence

  • From 2013–2015, an estimated 54.4 million US adults (22.7%) annually had ever been told by a doctor that they had some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia. Learn more about national arthritis statistics.
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Throughout September, I want to help bring attention to living with chronic pain and the suffering arthritis frequently causes. Let your family and friends know it’s Pain Awareness Month and ask them to help spread the word about how important it is to find more effective treatments and a cure for all forms of joint pain and arthritis.

Most of all, make sure you take care of yourself.

Tips on taking care of yourself and living with arthritis

References

Managing a flare – Arthritis Foundation- https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/managing-pain/pain-relief-solutions/tips-for-managing-an-arthritis-flare

Exercise and kids with JA – https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/physical-activity/getting-started/best-exercises-for-children-with-ja

Arthritis , Autoimmune and Rheumatology Research Cure Arthritis https://curearthritis.org/arthritis-research

Posted in Chronic Pain, Inflammation, Pain

Cabbage -Don’t Overlook This Inflammation Fighting Veggie

1. Lowers the Signs of Aging

Cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables contain a high amount of Vitamin C and E, which help in the production of collagen, the compound which keeps the skin elastic and wrinkle-free. Vitamin A along with Vitamin D protects the skin and gives you a youthful skin.

  1. Helps Fight Free Radicals

Cabbage is rich in antioxidants Antioxidants help fight oxidative damage caused by free radicals and prevent a whole range of ailments.

  1. Speeds Up the Recovery Process

Cabbage leaves are used as a poultice. Using these leaves can ease skin eruptions caused by acne, psoriasis, eczema, ulcers, wounds,insect bites and rashes. Grated leaves or blended leaves can be applied directly over the affected area with some dressing for faster healing.

  1. Improves Complexion

Cabbage can also help acne and other skin conditions. Some steamed cabbage leaves compressed in a cotton cloth can be placed on the affected area overnight for best results. The levels of potassium and Vitamin A also improve complexion.

  1. May Provide Relief From Allergies

Cabbages and other cruciferous vegetables of its kind contain anti-inflammatory properties. They are rich in sulforaphane and glutamine which are powerful anti-inflammatory agents. Regular consumption can ease health conditions worsened by inflammation such as allergies, irritation, fever, joint pain and skin disorders.

  1. May Prevent Cancer

The Brassica vegetables such as cabbage contain a significant amount of glucosinolates that have strong anti-cancer properties. These compounds scavenge free radicals which are bad for health and contribute to cancers of different kinds. Red cabbages are particularly loaded with compounds such as sinigrin, lupeol and sulforaphane with anti-cancer properties.

  1. Good for the Digestive Tract

Cabbage is high in fiber, which makes it healthy for the digestive tract. Eating cabbage can provide relief from constipation. This is very effective in treating constipation and related gastrointestinal disorders.

  1. Promotes Weight Loss

As cabbage is loaded with essential nutrients and contains almost no calories or fats, hence it is perfect for people who are on a weight loss diet. If you don’t like to eat cabbage in the form of vegetable, you can drink cabbage juice.

  1. Protects the Eye

Vitamin A which is an essential nutrient for our eyes is present in cabbage and helps maintain good vision. The beta-carotene, an antioxidant present in cabbage is also helpful in preventing macular degeneration and delay the onset of cataracts.

  1. Improves the Health of Hair

Cabbage being rich in many of the essential nutrients helps maintain healthy hair and prevents hair fall. It also prevents dry hair and protects the hair strands from physical damage. Vitamin C which is found in cabbage is essential for the production of the protein keratin which primarily makes up the hair and nails in the body.

  1. Improves the Health of the Heart

Red cabbages are rich in compounds called anthocyanins which give them their characteristic purple color. Studieshave shown a link between diet consisting of foods rich in these compounds and lowering of heart disease. Along with this, cabbages are also good sources of potassium and calcium essential for healthy functioning of the heart.

  1. Good for the Brain

Cabbage is also brain food. Vitamin K and anthocyanins in cabbage promote mental function and focus. Vitamin K is also important to protect the nerve cells from damage and prevent degenerative diseases. Cabbage is also a rich source of iodine which is an essential nutrient for the brain.

  1. Helps Strengthen the Bones

Cabbages are abundant sources of nutrients that are necessary for building strong bones. They are loaded with calcium, magnesium, and potassium which are all essential for strengthening the bones. Eating cabbage may also help in warding off diseases such as osteoporosis.

  1. Regulates Blood Pressure

Red cabbage is an abundant source of anthocyanins which is known to lower blood pressure. Eating cabbage regularly helps maintain normal blood pressure and decreases the risk of heart diseases.

  1. Good for Diabetic Patients

The potassium present in cabbage is not only good for lowering blood pressure but helps maintain blood sugar levels. It also improves mental well being by reducing stress and anxiety.

16. Boosts Immunity

Being loaded with Vitamin C and antioxidants, cabbage helps boost immunity. It supports the immune system and fights off various diseases.

17. Helps Treat Peptic Ulcer

The presence of anti-inflammation compounds such as glucosinolates helps reduce peptic ulcers in the stomach. Cabbage juice is a remedy for ulcers. It eases the inflammation in the stomach lining and speeds up the recovery process.

 

Tips to Select and Store Cabbage

To get the most out of cabbage, you must first choose the best ones from the market. Here’s how to pick good cabbages:

  • Cabbages are available all year round in supermarkets. Look for ones that are large, dense, and firm. They should have colorful leaves that are crisp and shiny without bruises, blemishes, or insect bites. They must also feel heavy for their size.
  • Tightly packed leaves at the bottom of the cabbage indicate freshness. If they are starting to separate from its stem, the cabbage is old. Don’t buy it if it seems old.
  • Shredded cabbage or which is already cut in half should be avoided as they would have lost their Vitamin C content.
  • To retain their freshness and Vitamin C level, it’s essential to keep them cold in a refrigerator.
  • Cabbages that are stored in plastic bags in a refrigerator can be stored for a week or two.
  • Cabbages with loose leaves will not last too long and are best stored in a cool dark place.
  • In case you need half a cabbage, the other half should be wrapped in a plastic bag with some water sprinkled on the cut side and refrigerated.
  • Another way to store cabbage effectively is to freeze it. First, shred the cabbage and blanch the shreds for two minutes. Filter out and freeze the shreds in an airtight container.

How to Cook Cabbage

You can include cabbage in soups, salads, and casseroles. It can be boiled, fried, stuffed, steamed or even eaten raw. Here are some healthy ways to cook cabbages:

  • A simple cabbage dish can be made by boiling some water and adding chopped cabbage to it. Add sugar and sprinkle some meat seasoning and simmer for 35 minutes.
  • Grated cabbage can be cooked in milk for 3 to 4 minutes and seasoned with pepper and salt.
  • A low-calorie cabbage dish involves cooking cabbage leaves in a mixture of mustard and cucumber juice. Steamed cabbage and other vegetables can be diced and added to it. Cook until the cabbage is a little crispy.
  • Shred red cabbage into fine pieces and add sliced apples and a bit of vinegar. Cook for 1 minute.
  • To make stuffed cabbage rolls, remove the core and stuff it with vegetables of your choice. Cook for 3 minutes until it is soft and serve with a spicy sauce.
  • For a quick and delicious dish, stir-fry sliced cabbage with ginger, garlic, chillies and a bit of soy sauce.

Are There Any Side Effects of Eating Cabbage?

Cabbages also have a few side effects like any other vegetable, some of them include:

  • Foodborne illnesses
  • Bloating
  • Goitre
  • Flatulence
  • Colic in babies

FAQs

  1. What Are the Different Varieties of Cabbage?

There are 7 varieties of cabbage – red cabbage, Choy sum, Bok choy, Savoy cabbage, Napa cabbage, Cannonball cabbage, January king cabbage.

 

2. Apply to sore joints.

You can place a leaf of cabbage on a sore joint and it will help pull out the inflammation, I have done this and felt the benefits.

 

**If Pregnant talk to your doctor about eating cabbage too often**

 

The information is provided on this website is for entertainment and general information purposes only.

While I aim to provide up-to-date information, I make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose.

You are reading of the information on this website is of your own free will and you are taking the provided information at your own risk.

The information we provide is for entertainment purposes only. I am  not providing medical, legal or other professional advice.  And will not be liable for anything you choose to do on your own. In fact I always suggest you talk to your own doctor before trying anything.

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis

What your eating maybe worsening your Osteoarthritis

Your eating what?

Before you take one more bite of that fast food lunch or dinner consider how it affects your osteoarthritis.

Did you know that research shows that diets high in saturated fat – found in red meat, butter, cheese, lard and processed foods – can weaken knee cartilage, making it more prone to damage.

Yep so start eating more plants

There was a study in 2017 published in Arthritis Care & Research, researchers followed more than 2,000 patients with OA for up to four years, checking disease progression  and diet at yearly intervals. Participants who ate the most fat, especially the saturated kind, showed increasing joint damage, whereas those who ate healthy fats like olive oil and avocados had little disease progression.

Another recent animal study showed that it even may harm the underlying bone, according to Yin Xiao, PhD, a professor at Queensland University of Technology in Australia and lead author of a 2017 study that looked at the effect of diet on OA.

“Our findings suggest that it’s not wear and tear but diet that has a lot to do with the onset of osteoarthritis,” he says.

Blame It On Inflammation

Fat’s not the only culprit, though. Sugar, refined carbs, red meat, processed food and corn and soybean oils can spark inflammation, too. Barry Sears, PhD, a long-time researcher in inflammatory nutrition, says eating them is “like throwing a match into a vat of gasoline.”

These foods also tend to pack on pounds, putting extra pressure on stressed joints. To make matters worse, body fat, especially the kind that collects around your belly, makes its own inflammatory proteins, perpetuating the cycle of inflammation even after you’ve sworn off junk food forever.

Fighting Back

The solution is to change the way you eat. Switching to an anti-inflammatory or Mediterranean-style diet can help you lose weight and significantly improve your joint, heart and  brain health without sacrificing good taste.

An anti-inflammatory diet is heavy on fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and healthy fats like olive oil, avocados and nuts. Poultry’s allowed  now and then and you can have one glass of red wine or beer a day. Off the menu, as you might expect, are sugar, red meat, and processed foods.

What sets this way of eating apart is that it actively fights inflammation, experts say.

“There are a variety of foods in the Mediterranean diet that are high in fiber, beta carotene, magnesium and omega 3s, all of which have been found to reduce inflammatory markers in human studies,” explains Michelle Babb, MS, RD, a Seattle-based nutrition educator.

“I’ve had [arthritis] patients who have been able to discontinue the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a result of transitioning to a Mediterranean diet. Some even report a noticeable difference in pain in the first week.”

Even so, changing the way you eat can be daunting.

“Don’t expect your diet to change overnight,” advises Sotiria Everett, EdD, RD, an assistant professor at Stonybrook University Medical Center in New York. “Start by looking at what you’re eating now (a food diary is a great way to do this) and identifying areas where you can improve.”

But Babb doesn’t see a problem. Her patients “really enjoy this food plan and don’t feel it’s a hardship to follow it,” she says.

She admits it takes more work and advance planning than the drive-through and recommends prepping some food for the week in advance.

I personally can agree with this as when I stopped eating so much red meat and cut out sugar and most processed junk I felt much better .

And when I eat things that are not as healthy as they should be I feel more pain.

So try a plant based diet or as they suggest Mediterranean

You will be so glad you did.

This taken from article Arthritis Foundation Blog

Posted in Awareness, Chronic Pain

Chronic Pain

AN ESTIMATED 50 MILLION AMERICANS LIVE WITH CHRONIC PAIN.

Hi this week I will be focusing on Chronic pain and various treatments.

Chronic pain is a public health crisis with far-reaching consequences for millions of individuals’ well-being, quality of life, productivity, health care costs, and more. Of the 50 million people who live with chronic pain, 20 million have high-impact pain, or pain that significantly interferes with activities of daily living.

DEFINITON

Chronic pain is often defined as pain lasting longer than three to six months. It also can be defined as pain that lasts beyond how long it should normally take to heal. It is the opposite of acute pain, which is temporary, specific, and treatable.

TYPES

Chronic pain can take many forms. For example, it can be mild or severe; intermittent or continuous; annoying or disabling; short-term or life-long. In addition, it can occur in nearly any part of the body and can cause a wide range of sensations. To learn more about a specific pain condition, visit www.learnaboutyourpain.com.

IMPACT

Understandably, chronic pain can affect quality of life and productivity. As a result, it my be accompanied by fatigue, insomnia, anxiety, depression, and other problems. In addition, the economic impact is staggering. In 2010 dollars, the cost of chronic pain—including the cost of treatment and lost productivity—was estimated at nearly $635 billion.

References

Posted in Awareness, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis, Pain

Osteoarthritis Facts

 

I have had OA for over 15 years and its painful. Its limiting and when you have it in your 40s it really sucks. Fast forward I am 56 and I am still learning how to cope with my pain associated with OA .

Writing about living with osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis as well as a bilateral pars fracture and spondylolisthesisin my L5 S1 has allowed me to meet great people, share my experiences with others, and better understand how people are dealing with similar issues. And hopefully help others like me.

We must not always sit sit means stiff and stiff means more pain.

Pain is the arguably the most distressing feature of osteoarthritis or any bone problem , affecting a patients quality of life and ability to carry out daily routines. Why osteoarthritis is sometimes painful and others painless is yet to be explained.

Today there are over 50 million adults in the United States have some type of arthritis. Although there are more than 100 different types of arthritis, when most people talk about arthritis many are referring to the most common type: osteoarthritis. More common in women, osteoarthritis causes chronic (long-term) symptoms and tends to occur more often as you age.

You are more at risk for osteoarthritis if you:

Are overweight

Have a family history of arthritis

Have had a previous joint injury

How to Manage Joint Pain as You Age

If you have osteoarthritis, your symptoms may come and go and they may become worse over time. Osteoarthritis symptoms can become so severe that you are unable to do certain things you could previously, such as write or walk up and down stairs. The most common symptoms of osteoarthritis include:

Pain and stiffness

Swelling near the joints

Trouble moving around without pain

Decreased range of motion

You can help prevent or delay osteoarthritis symptoms by doing the following:

Regularly exercising

Doing muscle strengthening activities

Avoiding repetitive movements that wear on joints

Maintaining a healthy weight

Living with Osteoarthritis

If you have mild or early symptoms of osteoarthritis, you can help manage your pain using these tips:

We have to keep moving — mild exercise, such as walking, at least once a day

Rest after activity

Alternate hot and cold on the affected joints

Massage therapy

Take over the counter anti-inflammatory pain relief if your allowed to- so check with your doctor

Most mild or moderate arthritis can be treated with a combination of anti-inflammatory medicine and hot/cold therapy or pain relieving creams, rubs or sprays. Some people find that acupuncture can also relieve arthritis symptoms.

When arthritis pain becomes severe, your doctor may recommend mild narcotic medicines with codeine or hydrocodone for pain.

Some patients also find temporary joint pain relief with corticosteroid injections. But use caution because this can cause an even bigger bone problem and that is Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis.

PRP and Prolotherapy as well as Injections like Euflexxa can help Oa and often can also ease some of the pain from osteonecrosis as well.

When medical treatment no longer provides relief, joint replacement surgery may be an option.

Did You know

The new study followed two groups of men and women who had knee osteoarthritis or were at risk for it. Among the first group, those who ate the most fiber were 30% less likely to develop knee pain or stiffness than those who ate the least fiber. More than 4,700 people with knee osteoarthritis were followed for 4 years.

The second group, which followed 1,200 for 9 years, had an even more dramatic result: top fiber consumers had a 60% lower risk for knee symptoms than those who consumed the least fiber.1

Researchers think that fiber’s benefits for those with arthritis stem from two factors:

  1. Fiber creates a feeling a fullness, which can help you eat less and manage weight better. Being overweight is a known risk factor for knee osteoarthritis.

See Knee Osteoarthritis Causes

  1. Fiber can decrease inflammation. Studies have found that fiber intake is inversely associated with levels in the body of C-reactive protein, an inflammatory marker.

Here are some great ways to add more fiber to your diet:

Add kidney or garbanzo beans or lentils to soups and salads

Instead of drinking juice, eat an orange or apple.

Keep raw, cut-up vegetables on hand for snacking. Dip them in yogurt or hummus and enjoy.

Keep fiber-rich snack options on hand, like unsalted nuts or dried fruit.

With a few small changes to your eating habits, you can help protect your knees, your heart, and more by getting fiber in your diet.

 

pain2

 

Education

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting millions of people worldwide. It occurs when the protective cartilage on the ends of your bones wears down over time.

Although osteoarthritis can damage any joint in your body, the disorder most commonly affects joints in your hands, knees, hips and spine.

Osteoarthritis symptoms can usually be effectively managed, although the underlying process cannot be reversed. Staying active, maintaining a healthy weight and other treatments may slow progression of the disease and help improve pain and joint function.

Symptoms

Osteoarthritis symptoms often develop slowly and worsen over time. Signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis include:

  • Pain. Your joint may hurt during or after movement.
  • Tenderness. Your joint may feel tender when you apply light pressure to it.
  • Stiffness. Joint stiffness may be most noticeable when you wake up in the morning or after a period of inactivity.
  • Loss of flexibility. You may not be able to move your joint through its full range of motion.
  • Grating sensation. You may hear or feel a grating sensation when you use the joint.
  • Bone spurs. These extra bits of bone, which feel like hard lumps, may form around the affected joint.

When to see a doctor

If you have joint pain or stiffness that doesn’t go away, make an appointment with your doctor.

Causes

Osteoarthritis occurs when the cartilage that cushions the ends of bones in your joints gradually deteriorates. Cartilage is a firm, slippery tissue that permits nearly frictionless joint motion.

In osteoarthritis, the slick surface of the cartilage becomes rough. Eventually, if the cartilage wears down completely, you may be left with bone rubbing on bone.

Risk factors

Factors that may increase your risk of osteoarthritis include:

  • Older age. The risk of osteoarthritis increases with age.
  • Sex. Women are more likely to develop osteoarthritis, though it isn’t clear why.
  • Obesity. Carrying extra body weight contributes to osteoarthritis in several ways, and the more you weigh, the greater your risk. Increased weight puts added stress on weight-bearing joints, such as your hips and knees. In addition, fat tissue produces proteins that may cause harmful inflammation in and around your joints.
  • Joint injuries. Injuries, such as those that occur when playing sports or from an accident, may increase the risk of osteoarthritis. Even injuries that occurred many years ago and seemingly healed can increase your risk of osteoarthritis.
  • Certain occupations. If your job includes tasks that place repetitive stress on a particular joint, that joint may eventually develop osteoarthritis.
  • Genetics. Some people inherit a tendency to develop osteoarthritis.
  • Bone deformities. Some people are born with malformed joints or defective cartilage, which can increase the risk of osteoarthritis.

Complications

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease that worsens over time. Joint pain and stiffness may become severe enough to make daily tasks difficult.

Some people are no longer able to work. When joint pain is this severe, doctors may suggest joint replacement surgery.

Imaging tests

Pictures of the affected joint can be obtained during imaging tests. Examples include:

X-rays. Cartilage doesn’t show up on X-ray images, but cartilage loss is revealed by a narrowing of the space between the bones in your joint. An X-ray may also show bone spurs around a joint. Some people may have X-ray evidence of osteoarthritis before they experience any symptoms.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An MRI uses radio waves and a strong magnetic field to produce detailed images of bone and soft tissues, including cartilage. An MRI isn’t commonly needed to diagnose osteoarthritis but may help provide more information in complex cases.

Lab tests

Analyzing your blood or joint fluid can help confirm the diagnosis.

Blood tests. Although there is no blood test for osteoarthritis, certain tests may help rule out other causes of joint pain, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

Joint fluid analysis. Your doctor may use a needle to draw fluid out of the affected joint. Examining and testing the fluid from your joint can determine if there’s inflammation and if your pain is caused by gout or an infection.

 

Medications

Osteoarthritis symptoms, primarily pain, may be helped by certain medications, including:

  • Acetaminophen. Acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) has been shown to be effective for people with osteoarthritis who have mild to moderate pain. Taking more than the recommended dosage of acetaminophen can cause liver damage.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Over-the-counter NSAIDs, including ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and naproxen sodium (Aleve, others), taken at the recommended doses, typically relieve osteoarthritis pain. Stronger NSAIDs, available by prescription, may also slightly reduce inflammation along with relieving pain.

    NSAIDs can cause stomach upset, cardiovascular problems, bleeding problems, and liver and kidney damage. Topical NSAIDs have fewer side effects and may relieve pain just as well.

  • Duloxetine (Cymbalta). Normally used as an antidepressant, this medication is also approved to treat chronic pain, including osteoarthritis pain.

Therapy

  • Physical therapy. A physical therapist can work with you to create an individualized exercise program that will strengthen the muscles around your joint, increase your range of motion and reduce pain. Regular gentle exercise that you do on your own, such as swimming or walking, can be equally effective.
  • Occupational therapy. An occupational therapist can help you discover ways to do everyday tasks or do your job without putting extra stress on your already painful joint. For instance, a toothbrush with a large grip could make brushing your teeth easier if you have finger osteoarthritis. A bench in your shower could help relieve the pain of standing if you have knee osteoarthritis.
  • Tai chi and yoga. These movement therapies involve gentle exercises and stretches combined with deep breathing. Many people use these therapies to reduce stress in their lives, and research suggests that tai chi and yoga may reduce osteoarthritis pain and improve movement. When led by a knowledgeable instructor, these therapies are safe. Avoid moves that cause pain in your joints.

Surgical and other procedures

If conservative treatments don’t help, you may want to consider procedures such as:

  • Cortisone injections. Injections of corticosteroid medications may relieve pain in your joint. During this procedure your doctor numbs the area around your joint, then places a needle into the space within your joint and injects medication. The number of cortisone injections you can receive each year is generally limited to three or four injections, because the medication can worsen joint damage over time.Use Caution as these can cause Osteonecrosis
  • Lubrication injections. Injections of hyaluronic acid may offer pain relief by providing some cushioning in your knee, though some research suggests these injections offer no more relief than a placebo. Hyaluronic acid is similar to a component normally found in your joint fluid.
  • Realigning bones. If osteoarthritis has damaged one side of your knee more than the other, an osteotomy might be helpful. In a knee osteotomy, a surgeon cuts across the bone either above or below the knee, and then removes or adds a wedge of bone. This shifts your body weight away from the worn-out part of your knee.
  • Joint replacement. In joint replacement surgery (arthroplasty), your surgeon removes your damaged joint surfaces and replaces them with plastic and metal parts. Surgical risks include infections and blood clots. Artificial joints can wear out or come loose and may need to eventually be replaced.
  • PRP Injections is a concentration of platelet cells taken from your blood, and these platelets have growth factors that may help in the healing process of chronic injuries. Growth factors are chemicals that signal the body to initiate a healing response.

Lifestyle and home remedies

Lifestyle changes can make a significant difference in osteoarthritis symptoms. Other home treatments also might help. Some things to try include:

  • Exercise. Exercise can increase your endurance and strengthen the muscles around your joint, making your joint more stable. Try walking, biking or swimming. If you feel new joint pain, stop.

    New pain that lasts for hours after you exercise probably means you’ve overdone it but doesn’t mean you have done any significant damage or that you should stop exercising. Simply resume a day or two later at a slightly lower level of intensity.

  • Lose weight. Obesity or even being somewhat overweight increases the stress on your weight-bearing joints, such as your knees and your hips. Even a small amount of weight loss can relieve some pressure and reduce your pain.

    Talk to a dietitian about healthy ways to lose weight. Most people combine changes in their diets with increased exercise.

  • Use heat and cold to manage pain. Both heat and cold can relieve pain in your joint. Heat also relieves stiffness, and cold can relieve muscle spasms and pain.
  • Capsaicin. Topical capsaicin — an active component in hot chili peppers — applied over an arthrititic joint may be an alternative for people who can’t take NSAIDs. It may not be noticeably helpful unless consistently applied three to four times a day for several weeks. Be sure to wash your hands well after applying capsaicin cream.
  • Apply over-the-counter pain creams. Creams and gels available at drugstores may provide temporary relief from osteoarthritis pain. Some creams numb the pain by creating a hot or cool sensation.

    Other creams contain medications, such as aspirin-like compounds, that are absorbed into your skin. Pain creams work best on joints that are close to the surface of your skin, such as your knees and fingers.

  • Braces or shoe inserts. Your doctor may recommend shoe inserts or other devices that can help reduce pain when you stand or walk. These devices can immobilize or support your joint to help take pressure off it.
  • Knee taping. Strapping tape may help ease the pain of knee osteoarthritis. Ask a doctor or physical therapist to demonstrate how best to place the tape.
  • Use assistive devices. Assistive devices can make it easier to go about your day without stressing your painful joint. A cane may take weight off your knee or hip as you walk. Carry the cane in the hand opposite the leg that hurts.

    Gripping and grabbing tools may make it easier to work in the kitchen if you have osteoarthritis in your fingers. Your doctor or occupational therapist may have ideas about what sorts of assistive devices may be helpful to you. Catalogs and medical supply stores also may be places to look for ideas.

Alternative medicine

Various complementary and alternative medicine may help with osteoarthritis symptoms. Treatments that have shown promise for osteoarthritis include:

  • Acupuncture. Some studies indicate that acupuncture can relieve pain and improve function in people who have knee osteoarthritis. During acupuncture, hair-thin needles are inserted into your skin at precise spots on your body.
  • Glucosamine and chondroitin. Studies have been mixed on these nutritional supplements. A few have found benefits for people with osteoarthritis, while most indicate that these supplements work no better than a placebo.Don’t use glucosamine if you’re allergic to shellfish. Glucosamine and chondroitin may interact with blood thinners such as warfarin and cause bleeding problems.
  • Avocado-soybean unsaponifiables. This nutritional supplement — a mixture of avocado and soybean oils — is widely used in Europe to treat knee and hip osteoarthritis. It acts as an anti-inflammatory, and some studies have shown it may slow down or even prevent joint damage.

 

Homemade Pain Rub

Pain Rub

Ingredients

½ cup carrier oil of choice (sweet almond, grapeseed, olive, etc.)

2 T. beeswax pellets (available here)

20 drops Lavender essential oil

10 drops Frankincense essential oil

10 drops Marjoram essential oil

10 drops Rosemary essential oil

Materials

Metal spoon

Large, heat safe glass bowl

Pot

Metal tin (such as these) or glass jar

Instructions

Pour the carrier oil and place the beeswax into the glass bowl.

Fill the pot halfway with water, and put it on the stove with medium high heat. Perch the glass bowl on top of the pot to create a double boiler effect. Once the water begins to boil, turn it down to medium low. You want the water to remain at a low boil, without getting all over the stove.

Stir the mixture with the metal spoon until the beeswax is melted.

Carefully remove the glass bowl from the heat and place it on a table top. Allow the mixture to cool for a few minutes, then stir in the essential oils. If the oil is too hot, the essential oils will just evaporate into the air.

Pour the muscle rub into metal tins, or the glass jar and let it cool to room temperature. You can also put the muscle rub in the fridge to speed up the process.

Do Not use on Broken skin

 

 

 

References and Pics

OA info and PRP

 

Mayo Clinic OA

Posted in Awareness, Bone and Joint Health, Chronic Pain, Pain, Vitamins, Winter

Chilled to the Bone: Tips for Icy Aches and Pains and Calcium and Vitamin D

As winter creeps ever closer, Ohioans are about to be reminded that they live in a state where temperatures reaching down to the teens and single digits with the wind chill.

Pain can become worse if you live in cold climates especially bone pain. We have to eat very healthy and try to move even if its indoors.

Ways to ease pain but pain free mmmm not always

How to Ease Worsening Winter Joint Pain

Aching joints can cause pain any time of the year, but sensitivity tends to spike when temperatures drop. Winter weather conditions tend to keep people indoors and inactive. Combined with the increased chill, a sedentary lifestyle can worsen joint pain and rheumatic conditions during the winter months.

But the next time you feel a snowfall coming on from the ache in your knee, turn to one of these six reliefs for winter joint pain.

  1. Dress Warmly

Wear extra layers in the areas you’re prone to aching joints. An insulated pair of gloves or fleece-lined pants will keep you warm and relieved.

  1. Keep Active

A study published in the Journal of Physical Activity revealed that sedentary time in Chicago increased by over three hours between November and June. Staying active is an essential part of fighting joint pain, so pursue indoor activities like the treadmill, elliptical or stationary bike. If you’re aching but not arthritic, consider yoga or Pilates.

  1. Warm Up in Water

Swimming in a heated pool is a great way to get some necessary winter exercise while soothing your bones. Warm baths can also ease the pain, but give your body temperature time to normalize before going outside!

  1. Eat Well

Ease aching joints during the cold months with a balanced diet of lean protein, fats and fiber. Drink lots of water and eat at least two portions of fish a week, keeping your saturated fat, refined carbohydrates and sugar intake as low as possible.

Supplements for vitamin D, C and K can sometimes help, as well as fish oil, cod liver oil and some over-the-counter anti-inflammatory options like aspirin. Consult your primary care physician for more information.

  1. Treat with a Massage

Winter is especially rough when you have a rheumatic condition. Take this time to treat yourself to a massage to ease cramped muscles, or explore acupuncture for a nontraditional approach to joint pain.

  1. Stay Safe

The cold does enough damage to your joints without getting an injury involved. Wear solid and supportive boots when you go out, and be extra careful of ice!

7. Heat Wraps!! I love Thermacare Heat wraps they help ease joint pain and warm the joints all at the same time.

8. Curcumin  – Its great but not everyone can take it so check with your doctor.I take Terry Naturally Curamed 375  Brand  It contains a clinically proven curcumin that is significantly better absorbed than turmeric or plain curcumin products.

Now For the Vitamin D – Don’t Forget Your D and Calcium 

Known as the sunshine vitamin, Vitamin D plays an important role in your bone health.1 It is mostly made by the body through exposure to sunlight. This is unique to vitamin D since most vitamins come from the foods you eat. Having too much or too little vitamin D in your body can affect the amount of calcium in your bones and can take a toll on your overall bone health:

Low levels of vitamin D can lead to decreased bone mass (osteoporosis) which can increase your risk of fractures.

Too much vitamin D can lead to calcium deposits in the kidneys (kidney stones), or calcium build-up in other soft tissues like the heart, lungs, and blood vessels.

More than 90% of a person’s vitamin D requirement tends to come from our casual exposure to sunlight. This poses some unique challenges for those  of us whose environments limit our exposure to the sun.

When sun exposure are limited, you can get vitamin D naturally from a few foods, including egg yolks or fatty fish such as salmon or mackerel.

This winter, increase your vitamin D intake and keep your bones strong by reading nutritional labels and seeking out products during your regular grocery shop that are fortified with vitamin D. It also never hurts to add a little bit more sunlight to your day!

The best way to get more calcium is from your diet. You probably already know that dairy products — such as milk, cheese, and yogurt — provide calcium. Other foods that are high in calcium include:

Spinach – Kale – Okra – Collards – Soybeans – White beans

Some fish, like sardines, salmon, perch, and rainbow trout

Foods that are calcium-fortified, such as some orange juice, oatmeal, and breakfast cereal

Foods that provide vitamin D include:

Fatty fish, like tuna, mackerel, and salmon

Foods fortified with vitamin D, like some dairy products, orange juice, soy milk, and cereals

Beef liver – Cheese – Egg yolks

To get vitamin D from food, fish is a good option. Three ounces of cooked salmon has more than 450 international units (IU) and theres supplements as well.

How Much Do You Need?

Here’s how much calcium and vitamin D you need every day, according to the Institute of Medicine.

**If your low your doctor may have you take more until you are in normal range**

Calcium

Children 1-3 years old: 700 milligrams (mg)

Children 4-8 years old: 1,000 mg

Children 9-18 years old: 1,300 mg

Adults 19-50: 1,000 mg

Women 51 to 70: 1,200 mg

Men 51 to 70: 1,000 mg

Women and men 71 and over: 1,200 mg

Vitamin D

Age 1-70: 600 IU

Age 71 and older: 800 IU

winter.

references

Click to access Vitamin_and_Mineral_Chart.pdf

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/how-much-vitamin-d-to-take#section3

Posted in Arthritis, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis, Pain, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Understanding The Mechanisms of Pain

It’s safe to say most of us are not really fans of pain. However it is one of the body’s most important ways for communication. Imagine, for instance, what would happen if you felt nothing when you put your hand in hot water, or burned your neck with a curling iron , or hit your thumb with a hammer and never felt that pain signal.

Pain is one way the body tells you something’s wrong and needs attention.

But pain whether it comes from a burn, a broken bone, surgery, joint replacement or a long-term illness is also an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience.

It has multiple causes, and people respond to it in multiple and individual ways. The pain that you push your way through might be incapacitating to someone else. Pain can make us mentally exhausted and sad if we experience it for to long.

Acute Pain and Chronic Pain

There are several ways to categorize pain. One is to separate it into acute pain and chronic pain.

Acute pain typically comes on suddenly and has a limited duration. It’s frequently caused by damage to tissue such as bone, skin, muscle, or organs, and the onset is often accompanied by anxiety or emotional distress.

Chronic pain lasts longer than acute pain and is generally somewhat resistant to medical treatment. It’s usually associated with a long-term illness, such as osteoarthritis. In some cases, such as with fibromyalgia, it’s one of the defining characteristic of the disease. Chronic pain can be the result of damaged tissue, but very often is attributable to nerve damage.

Just as there are different types of arthritis, there are also different types of pain. The pain you experience can come from various areas of the musculoskeletal system and involve different types of information processing. To learn more about the basics of the nervous system and pain.

Nociceptive Pain

What a odd word I never heard of this word until I was doing research on pain.

This is the normal mechanism that the body uses to process pain day to day. Nociceptive pain occurs when tiny nerves (nociceptors) that run on the surface of organs, muscles, joints and throughout the body are stimulated. These messages are carried by nerves to the brain. For example, when you bang your elbow, you feel nociceptive pain.

Mechanical Pain. Nociceptive pain that happens with stretch or pressure in and around joints is called mechanical pain. Osteoarthritis, low back disorders and tendinitis are common examples of mechanical pain.

Inflammatory Pain. Inflammation is an essential process that helps the body respond to and heal an injury. But it also activates nerves and causes pain. When joints are inflamed, damage to bone, muscles and cartilage (the slick surface between bones of the joints) can occur. Examples of inflammatory arthritis are rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, lupus, gout and ankylosing spondylitis.

Neuropathic pain happens when there’s too much or persistent pressure on nerves or they are damaged. It’s often described as burning, tingling, shooting, stinging or as “pins and needles.” Some people may describe a stabbing, piercing, cutting or drilling pain. An example of this type of pain is sciatic pain due to irritation of the sciatic nerve by a disc or bone spur. The pain starts at an area of the spine in the lower back and can run across the hip and buttock and down the leg.

 

Centralized pain was first used to describe pain that happens when the central nervous system (brain, brainstem, spinal cord) is damaged. It now is used to describe any pain that happens when the central nervous system doesn’t work properly and amplifies or increases the volume of pain. Other terms used to describe this condition include “central sensitization,” “central amplification” and “central pain syndrome.” Several common conditions, such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and temporomandibular joint disorder are examples. Arthritis joint pain can also become centralized in some people, especially if it is long-lasting.

Psychogenic pain is an older term for what happens when emotions cause pain in the body, make existing pain worse or make it last longer. As doctors learn more about how the central nervous system works, fewer types of pain are put in this category. For example, fibromyalgia was once considered psychogenic, but new discoveries have shown problems with pain processing in fibromyalgia. Headache, muscle pain and low back pain are commonly influenced by your emotions.

Wishing you a pain free day

Deb

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Pain

World Arthritis Day!

Today October 12, is World Arthritis Day!

Throughout the day you will see facts and info on arthritis and pain. There are over 100 forms of arthritis.

World Arthritis Day is a special day that unifies people of all ages, races, and genders to raise awareness of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases

Approximately 350 million people worldwide have arthritis. Nearly 54 million persons in the United States are affected by arthritis, including over a quarter million children! More than 21 million Americans have osteoarthritis. Approximately 2.1 million Americans suffer from rheumatoid arthritis.

Awareness
Arthritis is the nation’s number one cause of disability, affecting 1 in 4 adults, impacting the economy and causing daily struggles for the many people affected with arthritis.

Economically, over 156 billion dollars annually are lost in wages as well as medical expenses. Surgeries like knee, hip, and other joint replacements generate more and more medical expenses. In 2011 alone, there were 757,000 knee replacements and 512,000 hip replacements!

Arthritis affects our troops and veterans significantly. It is the leading reason for medical discharge from service in the military, and one in three military service members are diagnosed with arthritis, compared to one in five civilians. Members of the military over 40 are twice as likely as civilians to have arthritis. They would be diagnosed two years after a blast injury, while a non-military service member would be diagnosed about ten years later.

The risk of arthritis is increased with the affliction of other chronic conditions. For example, 49 percent of adults with heart disease have arthritis, and one third of arthritic people have anxiety or depression. Other conditions like diabetes, high blood-pressure, and obesity raise the chance of arthritis.

Daily life is impacted as well. Many adults have significant physical limitations: one in 9 adults report trouble climbing stairs, and one in 22 have trouble grasping. People with arthritis are less likely to be physically active than those not affected, although physical activity is effective to relieve pain and can improve function for those with arthritis.

What You Can Do
Today, help us spread awareness about arthritis and the impact it has on families, friends and loved ones. On #WorldArthritisDay, celebrate those with arthritis for their strength and determination.

Share your stories on social media, tag us so we can see your post, and use the hashtag

#CureArthritis #Pain

#Arthritis 

See my posts also on my fb awareness page  Awareness for Avascular Necrosis & Other Conditions of The Bone and Joints

WAD

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain

Joint Pain

 Congratulations !  If you’re like me you are one of the 30 million adults in the United States who suffer with joint pain, you know the pain often is debilitating. It can keep you from staying active and limits your mobility and it even makes daily chores seem impossible. What you might not know is that many doctors can treat joint pain with more than just pills or surgery. Beware though some doctors will tell you about one procedure and then change it once they know your insurance example Medicare I felt one doctor thought less of me as a patient because I am disabled so he changed or tried to change the procedure. It pissed me off because I was all set to get the procedure we discussed and then he changed it.

Both procedures were covered under Medicare so I felt betrayed as if I wasn’t good enough for the other injection.

Newsflash people ….  on Medicare pay for the insurance hell I pay more than when I was working.

Make sure this doesn’t happen to you.

 

Depending on the severity of your pain, injections can be another option for easing your joint pain and help to get you moving again.

Doctors use these injections to try to reduce inflammation and pain in your joints some come with side effects and some risks.

The injections range from corticosteroids, which have been around for decades, to newer ortho-biologic injections like platelet-rich plasma (PRP) , Stem Cell and placental tissue matrix (PTM)

 

You and your physician will decide which one is best based on your individual needs. The issue is finding doctors qualified to do these.

Not every injection is right for every patient, in my case I hate steroid injections, not only did it make my pain worse it also comes with the risk of developing osteonecrosis. Something I already have. I have noticed that it seems like doctors are quick to prescribe and inject steroids. I stand my ground and refuse. But that’s me.

 

So here are some facts to help you know more about the options.

Corticosteroid injections

 

Use: This injection is the first line of defense against osteoarthritis symptoms and other joint pain in shoulders, knees and hips. Corticosteroids can offer relief for two to three months, and reduce inflammatory cell activity in the joint. In some people.

Side effects and Risks : As with all injections, there’s a small chance of infection about one in 1,000 as well as Joint infection.

Nerve damage.

Thinning of skin and soft tissue around the injection site.

Temporary flare of pain and inflammation in the joint.

Tendon weakening or rupture.

Thinning of nearby bone (osteoporosis)

Osteonecrosis lack of blood supply to the bone

Raised blood sugar level

Whitening or lightening of the skin around the injection site

Cost: Most insurance covers the $100 -$200 usd cost of these injections. Your insurance provider may require that you try at least one corticosteroid injection first to see whether it works. If not, you may move on to a different therapy.

 

Hyaluronic acid injections

Use: Hyaluronic acid (HA) injections often are used when corticosteroid injections don’t work. But they usually are approved only for use in the knee.

In some instances, doctors consider an HA injection first if you don’t have obvious signs of inflammation. HA also is a better option if you have diabetes, as corticosteroids can raise blood sugar levels.

Also known as gel injections, HA injections are chemically similar to your natural joint fluid.

When you have osteoarthritis which is different than osteonecrosis lucky me I have both, the joint fluid becomes watery.

So, this injection helps to restore the fluid’s natural properties and works as a lubricant and a shock absorber.

HA is a cushion or a buffer against inflammatory cells in the joint.  In some cases, it can stimulate the knee to start producing more natural HA.” Some physicians also believe that HA helps reduce pain by coating nerve endings within the joint.

One treatment, which may consist of between one and three injections, usually offers symptom relief for four to five months, but sometimes up to one years. However, pain and stiffness will return. Most insurance companies only approve one HA injection every six months.

In knees with osteoarthritis, the joint fluid (called synovial fluid) can break down and not provide the cushioning your knee needs

Durolane

Euflexxa

Hyalgan

Orthovisc

Monovisc

Supartz

Synvisc, Synvisc-One

Depending on which type your doctor uses, you may get a single shot. Or you’ll get three to five injections spaced a week apart.

 

Side effects: There’s a 1-in-100 chance of an inflammatory reaction, The most common short-term side effects are minor pain at the injection site and minor buildup of joint fluid. These get better within a few days.

 

Cost: HA injections cost more — about $300 to $850 per injection, but most insurance companies cover the cost for knee injections.

 

 

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections

Use: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections can treat osteoarthritis joint pain, and are being thoroughly researched to understand their effects.

These injections use your own blood and platelets to promote healing. Platelets contain growth factors and proteins that aid healing in soft tissues. Research shows PRP injections can alter the immune response to help reduce inflammation,

Side effects: Side effects include a very low risk of infection and pain at the injection site. You must stop oral anti-inflammatory medications for a short amount of time if you get a PRP injection.

Cost: Insurance companies don’t generally cover PRP injections and you will pay between $400 and $1,300 per injection out-of-pocket.

 

Stem Cell Injections

The world’s most advanced regenerative injection treatments for treating knee pain due to arthritis, meniscus tears, traumatic ligament injuries, overuse conditions and other degenerative conditions.

 

Side effects : mild discomfort associated with the procedure. There is a very small risk of infection whenever aspirations and injections are performed. Nerve damage, vessel damage, and injury to other important structures are exceedingly rare

 

 

Placental tissue matrix (PTM) injections

 

Use: Placental Tissue Matrix (PTM) injections can very profoundly decrease the pain related to osteoarthritis.

 

These are injections of placental tissue, which is obtained after a healthy baby is delivered from a healthy mother. Research has discovered that there is a large number of growth factors in placental tissue that promote healing, Dr. Genin says.

Side effects: Side effects include a  low risk of infection and pain at the injection site. The placental tissue is “immune privileged,” which means the body would not have an adverse reaction to it.

Cost: Insurance companies don’t generally cover PTM injections; you will pay around $1,800 -$2500 per injection out-of-pocket.

 

Many of these injections often are effective in reducing or stopping your joint pain, but it’s important to remember that they may not keep the pain from returning, Dr. Schaefer says. In fact, they’re most effective when used with other therapies.

 

As a patient who has Osteonecrosis, Osteoarthritis, and other stuff I consider surgical options as a last resort only if other treatment options have failed. Unfortunately some treatments I cannot even afford to try. I wish the FDA would get a move on and approve some things so insurance companies can have this as a form of treatment.

 

 

 

 

Stem Cells

 

BONE MARROW AND FAT CELLS

The stem cells used in this point of care clinic are Autologous Cells that we take from your own body.  These cells are taken from your own Bone Marrow or Fat Cells.  The cells are your own Stem Cells and will not be rejected by your body.

Taking the Bone Marrow or Fat Cells from your body is relatively painless as a mild local anesthetic is used prior to harvesting.  These cells are processed to receive the most stem cell gain and then injected into the area of your body where you need the growth factors to go to work the quickest.  Your blood is also drawn and your platelet rich plasma is added to the Stem Cells taken from your Bone Marrow or Fat Cells to increase the activity of the growth factors.

It is important that these cells are used the day they are extracted from your body in order to insure they remain alive and active.  Our clinic does not grow extra stem cells from your Bone Marrow or Fat Cells to ensure that they are alive and active.  It is an FDA requirement that you receive your cells the same day they are harvested.

You get only the stem cells we extract from your body and there is no other manipulation used except extraction and preparation of the samples taken from your own body.  The cells are taken in a procedure that creates only mild discomfort or none at all.  Ninety nine percent of our patients experience no pain obtaining bone marrow or fat cells.

 

CORD STEM CELLS:

 

Embryo and Placenta stem cells can create certain types of cancers.  The cord blood Stem Cells should only be used if they are obtained from a healthy relative and you are a good match.  Cord Stem Cells that are used outside of the country or shipped to this country are illegal.  The FDA has found diseases in these grown cells and states that most of them are dead.  Even though the physicians supplying these Cord Cells claim they are safe to use, you should use extreme caution before considering these procedures.

 

ARE YOU A CANDIDATE FOR THESE STEM CELL PROCEDURES

 

REBUILDING JOINTS & SPINE: The Stem Cells that are obtained from your body are placed into all joints and spine to rebuild and regenerate new tissue growth as determined by the clinic physician.   There has been clinical evidence that new cartilage can be grown within your joint provided you are determined a candidate by the clinical physician.  Not all patients will be a candidate and may require joint replacement.

 

TORN TENDONS:  If the patients tendons are not completely torn this procedure will produce new tissue growth to regenerate torn tendons. Our clinic physician can only determine this with an initial visit and evaluation.

 

 

 

How Does PRP Therapy Work?

To prepare PRP, a small amount of blood is taken from the patient. The blood is then placed in a centrifuge. The centrifuge spins and through a multi-functional process separates the plasma from the blood producing the PRP. This increases the concentration of platelets and growth factors up to 500% also increasing hMSC (human stem cells) proliferation as a function of 8-day exposure to platelet released concentrations 10x. (x= increase above native levels)

 

When PRP is injected into the damaged area it stimulates the tendon or ligament causing mild inflammation that triggers the healing cascade. As a result new collagen begins to develop. As this collagen matures it begins to shrink causing the tightening and strengthening of the tendons and ligaments of the damaged area.

 

What is Platelet Rich Plasma?

Platelet Rich Plasma or PRP is blood plasma with concentrated platelets. The concentrated platelets found in PRP include growth factors among the huge reservoirs of bioactive proteins that are vital to initiate and accelerate tissue repair and regeneration. These bioactive proteins increase stem cell production to initiate connective tissue healing, bone regeneration and repair, promote development of new blood vessels and stimulate the wound healing process.

 

PRP Regenerates Tendons & Ligaments

Tendons connect the muscle to the bone making it possible for you to do many everyday physical activities. Overuse or damage to the tendon over a long period of time causes the collagen fibers in the tendons to form small tears, a condition called tendonitis. Damage to tendons most often occurs in the knees, ankles, hips, spine, elbows, shoulders, and wrists.

 

Ligaments are composed of collagen fibers that hold one bone to another, stabilizing the joint and controlling the range of motion. When a ligament is damaged, it is no longer able to support the bones in the joint, which often leads to pain symptoms. The instability causing the pain in your joints does not always show up on high tech imaging equipment. Through a thorough neurological and orthopedic evaluation Dr. Baum can determine which ligaments and tendons are unstable due to injury, wear or tear.

 

Tendons and ligaments have a poor blood supply and they do not usually heal from damage. Combined with the stress of day-to-day activities tendons and ligaments become inefficient causing degeneration of the joint which leads to chronic pain and weakness. Patients who experience chronic pain may not even remember when the injury occurred.

 

How Does PRP Compare With Cortisone Shots?

Studies have shown that cortisone injections may actually weaken tissue. Cortisone shots may provide temporary relief and stop inflammation, but may not provide long term healing. PRP therapy is healing and strengthening these tendons and ligaments and in some cases thickening the tissue up to 40%.

 

Treatment Plan

PRP injections with guided ultrasound can be performed on tendons and ligaments all over the body. Cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine, degenerative disc disease, arthritic joints shoulder pain, hip pain, and knee pain, even the smaller joints of the body can all be treated effectively with PRP. Dr. Baum will determine whether prolo solution, Platelet Rich Plasma or a combination of both will be the most effective form of treatment for you during his initial consult and evaluation.

 

Frequency Of Treatments

While responses to treatment vary, most people will require 3 to 6 sets of injections of PRP. Each set of treatments is spaced 4 to 6 weeks apart.

 

Is PRP Right For Me?

If you have degenerative spine or joint disease, a tendon or ligament injury, laxity or tear and traditional methods have not provided relief then PRP therapy may be the solution. It will heal tissue with minimal or no scarring and alleviates further degeneration and builds new tissues. There will be an initial evaluation with Dr. Baum to see if PRP therapy is right for you.

 

What Can Be Treated?

Platelet Rich Plasma injections helps regenerate all areas of the body including the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine, wrists, elbows, shoulders, hips, knees and ankles as well as tendons and ligaments all over the body.  Dr. Baum is one of the few physicians performing PRP procedures to all areas of the spine.  Our clinic treats patients with sports injuries, arthritic and degenerative joints and degenerative disc disease. More specific injuries including tennis elbow, carpal tunnel syndrome, scoliosis, ACL tears, shin splints, rotator cuff tears, plantar faciitis and iliotibial band syndrome may all be effectively treated with PRP.

 

What Are The Potential Benefits?

Patients can see a significant improvement in symptoms as well as a remarkable return of function. This may eliminate the need for more aggressive treatments such as long-term medication or surgery.

 

Special Instructions

You are restricted from the use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) one week prior to the procedure and throughout the course of treatments.

 

Initially the procedure may cause some localized soreness and discomfort. Most patients only require some extra-strength Tylenol to help with the pain. Ice and heat may be applied to the area as needed.

 

How Soon Can I Go Back Regular Activities?

PRP therapy helps regenerate tendons and ligaments but it is not a quick fix. This therapy is stimulating the growth of new tissue requiring time and rehabilitation. Under Dr. Baum’s supervision patients will begin an exercise program immediately following the first procedure. During the treatment program most people are able to resume normal activities and exercise.

 

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Matrix Graft by David Crane, MD and Peter A.M. Everts PhD

 

PRP application techniques in musculoskeletal medicine utilize the concentrated healing components of a patient’s own blood—reintroduced into a specific site—to regenerate tissue and speed the healing process

 

PRP INJECTION APPLICATION SITES

Spine

Cervical/Thoracic/Lumbar/Sacral

Shoulders & Elbows

Wrist & Hand

Hip/Pelvis

Knee & Lower Leg

Ankle & Foot

Fingers & Toes

Arthritic Joints

Osteoarthritis

Some Osteonecrosis

 

 

 

 

Information

http://www.prolotherapy.com/PPM_JanFeb2008_Crane_PRP.pdf

https://drjamesbaum.com/wp-content/uploads/stemcells2002-0109.pdf

 

 

Important Videos Everyone Should watch on Biologics

https://drjamesbaum.com/2013/07/the-science-of-mesenchymal-stem-cells-and-regenerative-medicine/

 

Scientific Papers on Research of Stem Cells

https://drjamesbaum.com/stem-cells/scientific-papers/

 

 

 

knnz

 

I will be posting this in my other blog section also

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Chronic Pain, Clinical Trials, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Hashimoto, Hypothyroidism, Life, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, SPONK, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Support Group, Hope, The Mighty, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards, wellness

WEGOHealth Awards and How to Nominate Others

I’m honored to say I’ve been nominated for the #WEGOHealthAwards! These awards seek to recognize Patient Leaders who are making an impact with their advocacy. Learn more – nominate today.

Here’s how you can also nominate others who educate, advocate and make a difference!

Click link below

WEGOHealth Awards and Nomination Info

WEGOHealth Awards Link To Information

Think about the advocates and influencers you see leading Facebook groups, blogging about their health journey, speaking up and giving insights to healthcare companies, presenting on national stages, and running Twitter chats.

Patient Leaders have started non-profits, published podcast episodes, and authored books – there is no shortage of Patient Leaders’ contributions to the world, so let’s recognize as many of them as we can for their talents, contributions, and commitment.

Feel free to add their names and web info also in my comment section! And they can get some recognition here to !

Have a Great Day Everyone

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, SONK, SPONK, Stem Cell, Stem Cell Injections, Thoughts, WegoHealth, wellness

The Cost Of Knee Replacements

If you’re having trouble with your knees, you’re not alone.

I also have knee issues. I have Osteonecrosis and osteoarthritis and a torn meniscus all in the same knee.

And doctors are basically waiting for my knee to collapse to replace it.

Me I’m looking to avoid a collapse but at the 10k out of pocket cost it’s almost impossible. I’m talking stem cell injection.

Many people young and old alike are having many problems with their knees and ready to stop the pain.

Can you believe knee replacements have doubled in the United States from 2004 to 2014!

People want to have relief from their knee pain. The shouldn’t have to pas on a treatment that will work becz it’s not covered, or be stuck to live in pain until the knee collapses, then be forced to pay for a replacement.

One option that often comes up is knee replacement surgery.

However, it’s a very expensive surgery that includes a lot of pain and extensive physical therapy. And come on now let’s not forget they remove the end of the knee and replace it with artificial parts.

So let’s walk you through the true cost of knee replacement surgery so you have an idea of what to expect.

Pre-Surgical Consultation Fees

Individuals having knee replacement surgery can expect to incur costs long before actually being admitted to the hospital.

A pre-surgical evaluation or consultation must be completed by your orthopedic surgeon in order to see if an individual can even have the surgery. I think they do this for every surgery to make sure we are strong enough to handle the surgery and not die in the table.

I had umbilical hernia surgery in 2017 and had a cut scan , then a stress test, blood work. All for a 40 minute hernia repair.

Anyway………

This consultation will involve imaging X-rays and MRI’s ,then there is blood work, cultures, and panels.

Patients can expect their providers to also do the following:

Determine bone mineral density

Issue a liver function test

Do an EKG or EC

Possibly a stress test

Conduct a urine test

The consult determines what type of knee replacement surgery will be required PKR or TKR partial or total knee replacement.

Then the cost of the hospital stay and surgery costs.

Those who gave a knee replacement should expect to be in the hospital for at least 2-6 days.

During this time, the patient will require the help of many healthcare professionals.

The cost of the inpatient stay will largely be dependent upon the following:

Length of time in the operating room

Any preexisting conditions that require extra care

Type of implant

Surgical approach

Complications

Number of days in the hospital

Be prepared while in the hospital you will be paying for everything, every pill, glass of water, meals, physical therapy, nurses all of it

Many knee surgery candidates elect to have surgery overseas due to the large difference in cost. In some countries, knee replacement surgery is 50 to 80 percent cheaper than they are in the United States. But no always covered by insurance and it can be risky.

So say you have an 80/20 plan and your knee replacement is 45,000.00 your 20 percent is 9000.00

Now a stem cell injection is 8-10,000usd. Would it not be more cost effective and save the patient pain , and the actual loss of their own joint to just even cover a stem cell injection if the patient meets the criteria?

Even 60/40 would be a plus.

We have get insurance companies, medicare and Medicare to come into the real world. We have great medical technology it’s time the average person has access to it.

Living a life waiting for your knee to collapse is no fun, it’s poor quality and when there are alternative options that could help if you qualify why are we forced to suffer.!!

Posted in Adrenals, Ahlbacks Disease, Apple, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Hashimoto, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis

Body Confidence

Can you be body confident when suffering from chronic pain? Do these two things even mix? Can I live in harmony again in a body that seems to work against me? I’ve been living with chronic pain for 4 years now. Some days I am in more pain than others .

I had to retire for now from my optometric tech -optician duties because of all the pain I have had and the limited mobility drives me crazy because I don’t like to be limited.  I mean my knee just wont move the way it should. My goal is to get back to work someday.

Overall I am  happy with myself, I am pretty, I am smart, I am good hearted , kind, compassionate giving person. I’m happy with my life, in spite of the challenges I deal with daily but I feel as if I’m struggling to be happy with my actual body. I mean I have a few things that are keeping me from dropping some weight which in turn will help my bones.

Dealing with adrenal fatigue and hashimoto’s on top of hypothyroidism , osteonecrosis , osteoarthritis and spondylolethesis just some days is well challenging.

My body is changing constantly, with new aches and pains.. It hurts a persons confidence sometimes. Don’t get me wrong, I am, confident  but I’m not 100%. like I used to be.

How can I be? My body stops me from being able to do things,like hiking which I miss and love, I cant roller skate anymore , I cant work like I used to . I also can’t  wear things because of the pain like my spike heels.

My fashion choices have changed as I have gained weight and when my pain gets worse,

If you were looking to me for some magical answers with this post, I don’t really  have any.

I’m exploring it all myself.

Yes I try many things some help a little , some help a lot but all seem to be temporary.

I do things like take curcumin for my pain, I make sure I eat healthy.

I am a Flexitarian who eats mostly plant based. I take my vitamins, I do exercise as best as I can.

Chronic pain affects people in different ways, but I really don’t think people understand how it can effect our body confidence.

I just cannot sit for 1-2 hours everyday to curl my hair & put on makeup, nor do I really want to.  I am now a eyeliner – lipstick kinda woman now and of course I still curl my hair just not with all the products in my hair

Can I wear a bra around the house? Mmmm I could but why LOL.

I try to ride my recumbent bike a few miles daily

Some days I walk some but its really a pain because depending on where I walk my knee will either love it or hate it.

My new thing is using dumbell’s every other day they are 8 lbs each ,

I have to keep the muscles somehow. And I am hoping I can build more muscle lose more fat.

I only use them for a few moves because I cant squat due to the knee problem and if I tried my knee pain would have me on the floor.

I don’t care if i lose 50 lbs but a good 25 would be nice. I dont even mind being a plus size curvy girl, I just know for my height and health of my bones dropping 25-30 lbs would be a real plus .I know I would feel so much better if I could drop some of this weight, I love me ,I love my body, I just want to love it more again.

Now Some Facts :

Here’s a look at what fat does to arthritis, as well as some tips to put you on the road to losing weight.

Fat and Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis, OA, is the most common type of arthritis, affecting approximately 27 million Americans. It is characterized by the breakdown of cartilage – the flexible but tough connective tissue that covers the ends of bones at joints. Age, injury, heredity and lifestyle factors all affect the risk of OA.

Why Obesity Matters

OA has a logical link to obesity: The more weight that’s on a joint, the more stressed the joint becomes, and the more likely it will wear down and be damaged.

“Weight plays an important role in joint stress, so when people are very overweight, it puts stress on their joints, especially their weight-bearing joints, like the knees and the hips,” says Eric Matteson, MD, chair of the rheumatology division at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Every pound of excess weight exerts about 4 pounds of extra pressure on the knees. So a person who is 10 pounds overweight has 40 pounds of extra pressure on his knees; if a person is 50 pounds overweight, that is 200 pounds of extra pressure on his knees. “So if you think about all the steps you take in a day, you can see why it would lead to premature damage in weight-bearing joints,” says Dr. Matteson.

That’s why people who are overweight are at greater risk of developing arthritis in the first place. And once a person has arthritis, “the additional weight causes even more problems on already damaged joints,” says Dr. Matteson.

But it’s not just the extra weight on joints that’s causing damage. The fat itself is active tissue that creates and releases chemicals, many of which promote inflammation.

“These chemicals can influence the development of OA,” explains Jeffrey N. Katz, MD, a professor of medicine and orthopaedic surgery at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

This effect can be seen in the numerous studies that have linked extra weight to hand OA. “Obviously, you don’t walk on your hands, so there may be something that is produced by fat cells in the body that causes the joint to break down more rapidly than it might otherwise,” says David Felson, MD, a professor of medicine and epidemiology at Boston University School of Medicine.

For both reasons – excess joint stress and inflammatory chemicals – fat should be kept in check among all people, especially those who already have OA.

For more info on how Excess fat can Affect The Bones with various conditions click >>>  How Fat Affects Bones

Curves

Posted in Adrenals, Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Awareness, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Delicious, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Hashimoto, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, SONK, SPONK, Uncategorized, Vegetables, WegoHealth, wellness

Healthy Eating

Developing healthy eating habits isn’t as confusing or as restrictive as many people imagine. The essential steps are to eat mostly foods derived from plants—vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes (beans, peas, lentils)—and limit highly processed foods.

 

For most of my life, I ate the standard American diet and meals that were heavy in meat and processed foods. I went to a vegetarian lifestyle in high school for a couple years then back to the old way.

When i was diagnosed with Osteonecrosis, Osteoarthritis HBP etc and especially when my husband had a heart attack in 2016 I thought enough was enough.

I got rid of a lot of processed foods, potato chips, convenience meals, and loved Oreo’s and Nutter Butter cookies. There was a lot of sugar, oil, and junk in my diet.

We quit smoking 2 years ago almost. and we as a team decided to go part time but mostly vegan .

Me having a few issues from Osteonecrosis, Osteoarthritis, Hashimot’s and Hypothyroidism and Adrenal Fatigue left me in pain and always exhausted.

I had been dealing with pain in my knee and back for a few years. My mind wants to go go go like it did 25 years ago, my knees say oh hell no slow down woman. And this extra weight is just hard on the bones. But when your limited by many bone issues its really hard to just walk 3-4 miles a day. I bike 3-4 miles a day but its not the same as a good hike in the woods. I do go now and then walking in the woods but hiking I’m afraid for now all that has been on hold.

Going to mostly plant based has helped my pain. And my energy.

So its working and I am feeling better slowly …..

Its a process…

Don’t just go all I went to 65 percent of eating all veggies daily  then added more from there. Some days i eat no meat or fish and some days i will. I Slowly cut out animal products, starting with the easiest and leaving barrier foods to the end. Slowly lessened  my consumption of animal products while simultaneously increasing the number of plant-based foods in our diet.

I spoke to my doctors and I will post tomorrow just how i got started

 

 

plantsz

Posted in Adrenals, Awareness, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Diagnosed, Ease your Stress, Endocrinologist, Hashimoto, Meditation, Mindfulness, Naturopath, Thoughts, Uncategorized, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards

Adrenal Fatigue

I find that more I learn about Naturopath’s the more I trust them. They explain things better, they take time to listen to you,they think outside the box.

My Naturopath Dr Danni is great she listens, actively listens when you talk to her.

My endocrinologist hears but doesn’t really listen. This happens often.

He finally listened to me when I asked for a Thyroid Antibody rest because I had a feeling for years I had Hashimoto and hypothyroidism. I mean you can’t feel this exhausted and foggy for no reason.

But many just snubbed me thinking they knew more than I did.

I was also told by many MDs adrenal fatigue doesn’t really exist……really?

So I did some checking…..

What Is It?

The term “adrenal fatigue” was coined in 1998 by James Wilson, PhD, a naturopath and expert in alternative medicine. He describes it as a “group of related signs and symptoms (a syndrome) that results when the adrenal glands function below the necessary level.” He says it’s usually associated with intense stress and often follows chronic infections like bronchitis, flu, or pneumonia.

Wilson says people with it may not have any physical signs of illness but still may feel tired, “gray,” and have fatigue that doesn’t get better with sleep. They also crave salty snacks.

The Theory Behind It

Your body’s immune system responds by slowing down when you’re under stress. Your adrenal glands, which are small organs above your kidneys, respond to stress by releasing hormones like cortisol. They regulate your blood pressure and how your heart works.

According to the theory, if you have long-term stress (like the death of a family member or a serious illness), your adrenal glands can’t continuously produce the extra cortisol you need to feel good. So adrenal fatigue sets in.

There’s no approved test for adrenal fatigue. Blood tests can’t detect a small drop in adrenal production.

The suggested treatments for healthy adrenal function are a diet low in sugar, caffeine, and junk food, and “targeted nutritional supplementation” that includes vitamins and minerals:

• Vitamins B5, B6, and B12

Vitamin C

Magnesium

Probiotics and a variety of herbal supplements are also recommended to help your body make more cortisol.

Is It a Myth?

There’s no science to back it up. The Endocrine Society, the world’s largest organization of endocrinologists (people who research and treat patients with diseases related to glands and hormones), flatly says that adrenal fatigue is not a real disease. And it says the symptoms of adrenal fatigue are so general, they can apply to many diseases or conditions (depression, sleep apnea, fibromyalgia) or stem from everyday life.

And the society says some of the treatments can be dangerous. Improving your diet will probably make you feel better, no matter what ailment you have, but taking supplements to help your body produce extra cortisol if you don’t need them may cause your adrenal glands to stop working, it warns

What Else Could It Be?

Symptoms such as being tired, lacking energy, and sleeping all day long could be signs of depression, sleep apnea, fibromyalgia, or a condition called adrenal insufficiency.

What Is Adrenal Insufficiency?

Unlike adrenal fatigue, this is a recognized disease that can be diagnosed. There are two forms of this condition, and both are caused by damage or problems with your adrenal glands that result in them not making enough of the hormone cortisol.

Symptoms of both forms include chronic fatigue, loss of appetite, muscle weakness, weight loss, and stomach pain. You might also have nausea, vomiting, low blood pressure, diarrhea, depression, or darkening of the skin.

Adrenal insufficiency is diagnosed with a blood test that checks to see if your cortisol levels are too low. If you have it, you’ll need to take a hormone replacement.

This taken from Web MD

Hmmmm so I personally don’t agree with all of that.

*Let’s read what a Naturopath says*

Adrenal Fatigue Explained

By Catherine Clinton, ND, Clinic of Natural Medicine

Questions about fatigue are some of the most common that naturopathic physicians hear from patients. We all become run-down now and then due to the stresses of everyday life and the demands of our busy schedules. Over extended periods this can overburden our bodies, creating a situation that’s not so easy to bounce back from. In particular the adrenal glands, being in charge of the release of various stress hormones, can become exhausted and unable to effectively do their job. This is referred to as “adrenal fatigue.” When this happens our fatigue can become chronic and be joined by other symptoms such as pain and inflammation.

The adrenal glands have many functions, including the secretion of cortisol and other hormones in response to stress. Stress can come from an emotional trigger like a fight with a loved one, trouble at work or a physical trigger like an injury or motor vehicle accident. When prompted by pain or inflammation cortisol is released from the adrenal glands into the blood. Cortisol modifies the inflammatory pathways resulting in a decrease in inflammation and pain. When a drop in blood sugar occurs cortisol is secreted to help balance the levels of sugar in the blood. Cortisol is also released from the adrenal glands in a 24 hour daily rhythm with a burst in the morning to help us awake and a decrease in the evening to help us sleep. When adrenal glands are required to secrete at high levels for extended periods of time due to prolonged stress, pain, or blood sugar imbalances, they can become fatigued or begin to secrete cortisol at lower levels. When this occurs it is common to see an increase in fatigue, pain and/or inflammation.

Naturopathic physicians usually test adrenal function with a salivary cortisol test. From this test naturopaths can effectively diagnose and treat adrenal issues. Some common treatments for the adrenal glands include:

• Rhodiola: This botanical has been extensively researched in Russia for its ability to increase physical stamina and increase the body’s resistance to stress. It is categorized as an adaptogen by Russian researchers due to its observed ability to increase resistance to a variety of chemical, biological, and physical stressors. Naturopathic doctors use it in adrenal fatigue treatments to combat stress and increase energy.

• Ginseng: The three ginsengs; Siberian, American and Asian, are all used to treat adrenal issues. Research shows that they increase energy, stamina, and reduce stress. A recent study in 2003 demonstrated how ginseng can effectively help to maintain healthy blood sugar levels as well.

• Stress management: With adrenal issues stress management is vital to any treatment. Proper sleep, stress reduction techniques such as deep breathing or meditation and exercise can all increase the body’s ability to handle stress.

• Nutrition/Blood sugar regulation: Eating a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes that provides antioxidants and nutrients is essential for adrenal health. The adrenal glands need a good diet rich in B vitamins, vitamin C, zinc and magnesium. Eating quality protein at each meal allows the body to maintain healthy levels of blood sugar without taxing the adrenals. Treating adrenal fatigue must address the diet and nutrition of the patient.

Addressing adrenal issues can have profound effects in patient’s lives. As with any medical treatment you should contact your local naturopathic physician to receive a treatment plan that fits your individual needs.

•Adrenal Fatigue

by Jennifer Abercrombie ND | Mar 11, 2013 | Articles By Our Doctors |

Do you feel exhausted in the morning or all day long, gain weight despite good diet and exercise habits, have difficulty sleeping, can’t get through the day without caffeine, have chronic gastrointestinal infections, retain excess water, have difficulty concentrating, suffer from multiple allergies, feel run down or worn out, have heart palpitations, or experience severe PMS? All of these can be caused by adrenal fatigue.

What are the adrenals?

You have probably heard about the adrenals as they are getting a lot of press lately, and for good reason. The adrenals are a big regulator in the body. They control stress and inflammation; they release hormones that control blood pressure (aldosterone), and DHEA and pregnenolone that convert to cortisol and sex hormones. Our bodies are designed as if we were still living in the era of cavemen. The stress response is designed to be a fight or flight response. Imagine you were just seen by a tiger in the wilderness, your adrenals release a relatively short burst of adrenaline that gives you heightened awareness and prepares your body to start springing if needed. But adrenaline is short lived in the blood so the adrenals then release cortisol to give you the capability to have a longer sustained muscle capacity and mental acuity to evade the tiger. Because the release of adrenaline and cortisol dramatically affect all systems in the body for the goal of saving your life from an acute threat, the body requires a period of rest and relaxation for the stress response to relax and for normal physiology to resume. This system isn’t created for the modern era where we have consistent stressors on a daily basis that do not allow the stress response to relax and recover.

What is “stress”?

Stress is more than just emotional and psychological. It can be physical such as inflammation, environmental toxins, and infections (viral or bacterial). Triggers for creating a stress response results from a poor diet that is high in simple carbohydrates and sugars, low or high blood sugar, lack of sleep, lack of exercise, menopause or andropause, environmental toxins, hormonal birth control, long term steroid use (they suppress the adrenals), street drugs, consistent stimulant use (coffee), hypothyroid state, and genetics. If your parents at conception had depleted adrenals and especially if your mother had adrenal dysfunction while she was carrying you in utero, you may be predisposed to having adrenal issues.

When stress becomes chronic

If any of the stressors become chronic and persist without giving the adrenals and the body a chance to recover, a sustained amount of cortisol is released. Too much cortisol suppresses the immune system. This is a natural defense as you don’t want to be exerting precious energy to fight off a viral infection while you are running away from the tiger.  The side effect is that you are left more susceptible to infection. When the stress stays for weeks to months, cortisol starts to get depleted as your adrenals burn through the nutrients that make cortisol. Too little cortisol from exhaustion, allows the immune system to run unchecked, resulting in increased inflammation. A heightened state of inflammation is implicated in advanced aging, hypertension, irritable bowel disease, high cholesterol, heart disease, depression, chronic disease, any autoimmune disease triggers, progressing cancers, and it creates a rocky transition into menopause.

Basic Treatments

Because everyone is an individual and the factors that create adrenal fatigue are a unique combination for each person, there is no one perfect treatment. Each person is going to require a different treatment plan. With that said, here are some basics:

• A modified GAPS/Paleo/Anti-Inflammatory diet that is specific to you

• Minimize simple carbohydrates, sugar, caffeine, and recreational drugs. Marijuana may relax you, but when used for stress management you don’t learn how to process stress properly and may become dependent on it and use it as a crutch.
• B Vitamins: whole grains, beans, peas, nuts, dark leafy greens
• Vitamin C: Fruits and veggies, especially papaya, cantaloupe, strawberries, bell peppers, broccoli, tomatoes, dark leafy greens
• Magnesium: Dark leafy greens, whole grains, nuts, seeds, legumes
• Zinc: Meats, seafood, poultry, pumpkin and sesame seeds, nuts, whole grains
• Fat: Good fat (including saturated fat) is needed to make cholesterol which makes DHEA, pregnenolone, and cortisol. Good sources are: organic meats, coconut oil, nuts, seeds, organic unsalted butter, avocado, and olive oil
• Water: Stay hydrated with clean, filtered water
• Sleep: A regular, consistent sleep pattern
• Light and exercise: Go outside, feel the sunshine, and to move the body
• Re-assess: Re-evaluate the stress in your life and any negative relationships. Find out how you can make changes to lower stress
• Connect with others: Foster and build strong, supportive relationships in your life
• Don’t over do it: Even when you are starting to feel strong, don’t burn yourself out with too many daily tasks, too much on the social calendar, or over-exercising
• Release: Find a way to release your stress. Examples include meditation, journaling, hiking, surfing, beach combing, walking barefoot in the sand, etc.

What bothers me the most is that MDs think that Naturopathic medicine is new , however most people don’t understand how long it’s been around.

I will write in this in the next few days.

Reference links

http://www.nawellness.com/adrenal-fatigue/

https://www.naturopathic.org/content.asp?contentid=314

https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/adrenal-fatigue-is-it-real