Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Chronic Pain, Clinical Trials, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Hashimoto, Hypothyroidism, Life, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, SPONK, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Support Group, Hope, The Mighty, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards, wellness

WEGOHealth Awards and How to Nominate Others

I’m honored to say I’ve been nominated for the #WEGOHealthAwards! These awards seek to recognize Patient Leaders who are making an impact with their advocacy. Learn more – nominate today.

Here’s how you can also nominate others who educate, advocate and make a difference!

Click link below

WEGOHealth Awards and Nomination Info

WEGOHealth Awards Link To Information

Think about the advocates and influencers you see leading Facebook groups, blogging about their health journey, speaking up and giving insights to healthcare companies, presenting on national stages, and running Twitter chats.

Patient Leaders have started non-profits, published podcast episodes, and authored books – there is no shortage of Patient Leaders’ contributions to the world, so let’s recognize as many of them as we can for their talents, contributions, and commitment.

Feel free to add their names and web info also in my comment section! And they can get some recognition here to !

Have a Great Day Everyone

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Ancestry, Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Chronic Pain, Clinical Trials, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Food, Happiness, History, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, OA, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Osteoporosis, Pain, SONK, SPONK, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Uncategorized, WegoHealth

Bone & Joint Action Week October 12-20

Bone and Joint Action Week is held annually October 12-20 with activities focused on disorders including arthritis, back pain, Osteonecrosis,Osteoarthritis trauma, pediatric conditions, and osteoporosis. The themes and their related activities are designed to raise awareness worldwide about prevention, disease management and treatment.

Statistics on Avascular Necrosis (AVN, Osteonecrosis, Aseptic Necrosis, Ischaemic Necrosis, Femoral Head Necrosis)

Frequency depends on the site involved. The most common site is the hip; other locations include the carpals, talus, and humerus. In most countries, exact figures on incidence and prevalence are unknown.

One Japanese survey estimated that 2500-3300 cases of AVN of the hip occur each year; of which, 34.7% were a result of corticosteroid abuse, 21.8% to alcohol abuse, and 37.1% to idiopathic mechanisms. A French study reported AVN in 4.3% of allogenic bone marrow transplant recipients.

Race: No racial predilection exists except for AVN associated with sickle cell disease and hemoglobin S and SC disease, which predominantly are diagnosed in people of African and Mediteranean descent.

Sex: The male-to-female ratio depends on the underlying cause, although primary AVN is more prevalent in men. The overall male-to-female ratio is 8:1.

Age: Age at onset depends on the underlying cause. Primary AVN most often occurs during the fourth or fifth decade and is bilateral in 40-80% of cases. On average, women present almost 10 years later than men.

Risk Factors for Avascular Necrosis (AVN, Osteonecrosis, Aseptic Necrosis, Ischaemic Necrosis, Femoral Head Necrosis)

Avascular necrosis has several causes. Loss of blood supply to the bone can be caused by an injury (trauma-related avascular necrosis or joint dislocation) or by certain risk factors (nontraumatic avascular necrosis), such as some medications (usually steroid basesd), steroid abuse in general, blood coagulation disorders like sickle cell, Factor V, FactorViii, MTHFR, eNOS and more, chemo and radiation infections in the Bone vascular issues such as vascularitis or alcohol abuse. Increased pressure within the bone also is associated with avascular necrosis. The pressure within the bone causes the blood vessels to narrow, making it hard for the vessels to deliver enough blood to the bone cells.Many deep sea divers get Avascular Necrosis from a condition known as the bends. Gaucher disease.

Progression of Avascular Necrosis (AVN, Osteonecrosis, Aseptic Necrosis, Ischaemic Necrosis, Femoral Head Necrosis)

Hip Stages of avn-on

1-4

The natural history of osteonecrosis is directly linked to the size and level of the necrosis. Very small lesions (involvement of less than 15% of the femoral head) may resolve without any further treatment. Conversly, lesions involving greater than 50% of the femoral head progress to collapse, and ultimately require in total hip arthroplasty.

Symptoms of Avascular Necrosis (AVN, Osteonecrosis, Aseptic Necrosis, Ischaemic Necrosis, Femoral Head Necrosis)

In the early stages of avascular necrosis, patients may be asymptomatic. However, as the disease progresses most patients will begin to experience joint pain; at first, only when putting weight on the affected joint, and eventually even when resting. Pain usually develops gradually and may be mild or severe.

If the level of necrosis progresses further and the bone and surrounding joint surface collapse, pain may develop or dramatically increase.

The pain may be severe enough to limit the patient’s range of motion in the affected joint.

In some cases, particularly those involving the hip, disabling osteoarthritis may develop.

The period of time between the first symptoms and loss of joint function is different for each patient, ranging from several months to more than a year.

How is Avascular Necrosis (AVN, Osteonecrosis, Aseptic Necrosis, Ischaemic Necrosis, Femoral Head Necrosis) Diagnosed?

In the earliest stages of Avascular necrosis plain x-rays are often normal. A magnetic resonance image (MRI) is the key that allows us to detect AVN at its earliest stage.

Osteonecrosis develops when the blood supply to a segment of bone is disrupted. Without adequate nourishment, the affected portion of bone dies and gradually collapses. As a result, the articular cartilage covering the bone also collapses, leading to disabling arthritis.

Osteonecrosis of the knee can affect anyone, but is more common in people over the age of 60. Woman are three times more likely than men to develop the condition.

Risk Factors

It is not always known what causes the lack of blood supply, but doctors have identified a number of risk factors that make someone more likely to develop osteonecrosis.

Injury. A knee injury—such as a stress fracture or dislocation, meniscus tear, bruised patella or combined with some type of trauma to the knee, can damage blood vessels and reduce blood flow to the affected bone.

Oral corticosteroid medications.

Many diseases, such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis, are treated with oral steroid medications.

Although it is not known exactly why these medications can lead to osteonecrosis, research shows that there is a connection between the disease and long-term steroid use. Steroid-induced osteonecrosis frequently affects multiple joints in the body.

Medical conditions.

Osteonecrosis of the knee is associated with medical conditions, such as obesity, sickle cell anemia, and lupus.

Transplants. Organ transplantation, especially kidney transplant, is associated with osteonecrosis.

Excessive alcohol use.

Overconsumption of alcohol over time can cause fatty deposits to form in the blood vessels as well as elevated cortisone levels, resulting in a decreased blood supply to the bone.

Chemo therapy and radiation Non-traumatic osteonecrosis of bone is recognized as a potential complication in solid-tumour cancer patients receiving treatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy.

Regardless of the cause, if osteonecrosis is not identified and treated early, it can develop into severe osteoarthritis. And for some with osteoarthritis before avn the disease is even more painful.

Knee stages of avn-on

1-4

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Have a blessed and Pain-free Day.

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Baking, Blessed, Bone Health, Breakthrough Crew, BreakThroughCrew, Candy, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Clinical Trials, Croatian Family, Delicious, Desserts, Diagnosed, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, Endocrinologist, Factor V Leiden, Family Tradition, Opinions, Thoughts, Uncategorized

Blogs

I think I will be starting a new blog just for recipes

Opinions? I really want your opinions

Since I am a health leader and advocate who lives with several chronic conditions

Should I focus on just that or have a mix

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Clinical Trials, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Eye Exam, Factor V Leiden, Flush not Blush, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Recipes, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Uncategorized, Vision, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards

Would appreciate your vote.

Just 2 days left to cast your vote , you can vote for each category I was nominated for. I would appreciate it very much.

Please take a moment to vote for me.

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Posted in Awareness, BreakThroughCrew, Clinical Trials, Diagnosed, Positivity, Uncategorized

Join The Breakthrough Crew

Become A member!

Who can participate?

Anyone and everyone! Patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, and individuals who believe in the power of research to transform lives.

What does participation entail?

As an official Breakthrough Crew Ambassador, your role is to help achieve the above three core goals through the following (please note that completing each of the following is not a requirement; think of these as a list of friendly suggestions!):

Raising awareness via social media

Sharing your story via a blog, video, pictures, art, performance, etc.

Representing the Breakthrough Crew at local healthcare events

Proudly wearing your #BreakthroughCrew swag

Participating in #BreakthroughCrew Twitter chats

For more information

Breakthrough Crew