Posted in Awareness, Disease, Education, Inflammation

Food – Inflammation And Pain Part 1 of 4

Part 1 of 4

 

When you are in pain, what you eat can have a huge impact on how you feel and your health period.

If you don’t get the proper vitamins to heal, you can prolong the pain that you are in.

In addition, certain foods can help fight inflammation, while other foods can make you feel worse.

If your in pain after an injury, or you have a condition that causes pain, you can get some relief by just eating a better.

You can also improve your mood, get better sleep, and help the healing process all with the food that you eat each day.

The Unhealthy Food You Eat Will Probably Make Your Pain Feel Worse

Junk food does a lot more to than make us gain weight.

When we eat foods that are high in sugar, this can cause pain to become worse.

Sugar can cause inflammation in the body, which is only going to add to your overall pain.

Plus if you eat food that is high in fat, you we be feeling sluggish rundown and tired all the time.

When you eat food that doesn’t provide any nutritional value, your body won’t be able to heal as easily.

Sure we may all eat a cookie or 2 or pressed for time and hit the local drive through but we cannot do that on a regular basis.

I noticed this when I started to keep a pain journal. If you want to start one here is how.

Before I get back to food inflammation and pain.

The Things to Include in Your Pain Journal 

What exactly do you log in a pain journal? Everybody uses their journal differently, but most practitioners advise including the following:

  • Give your pain a scale rating. Most pain scales  use the 0-10 rating system, with 0 representing no pain and 10 representing the worst imaginable pain. Your pain will usually fall somewhere in between.
  • Use pain descriptor words. Is your pain burning? Tingling? Pulsating? Using pain descriptor words in your journal can help you track changes and patterns in your pain quality. It can also help doctors pinpoint your type of pain.
  • Track the time of day pain occurs. Do you hurt more in the morning or the evening? How are your afternoons?
  • Note what you are doing when your pain begins. Did you just get out of bed, or had you been sitting for a while when your pain started? Were you exercising or overusing certain muscles in your body? Write down how you feel after activities, such as walking the dog or playing with the kids.
  • Look at elements that might contribute to your pain. Think about the external factors that may add to the pain, such as if you suffer from stiff joints; does this happen when it’s raining or cold outside?
  • Write down what you ate and drank that day. Foods and beverages may contribute to or worsen the pain you are experiencing. Jot down everything you ingested the day you feel pain.
  • Describe your mood. It’s also important to note your mental state and how you feel when experiencing pain. Are you depressed? Anxious? Fatigued? Obviously, the pain might be triggering these emotions, and your doctor may recommend you see a mental health specialist to deal with the feelings that arise as a result of your chronic pain.

You can also get apps like

Catch my pain

My pain diary

Are excellent apps.

Armed with your pain journal, your next visit to your health practitioner may be that much more helpful.

Now back to food

You Need Vitamins and Minerals to Help Your Body Heal

Sore and tired muscles, broken bones, joint replacements, bone disorders pulled and torn muscles and tendons all need the right vitamins and minerals in order to heal properly.

In the event of a broken bone, eating calcium-rich foods such as milk and cheese will help speed along your healing.

When your muscles are tight, eating nutrient-dense foods such as fruits and vegetables will give you the vitamins and minerals you need for your muscles to regenerate.

Healing takes time, and it will take you less time when you give your body the right nutrients.

Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are often the culprits that cause pain, decreased joint mobility and even limit our desire to enjoy an active lifestyle. Visions of long hikes, tennis games, playing a little three-on-three basketball, or dancing the night away may encourage you to take that leap – or limp – into hip it knee replacement surgery.

A Healthy Diet Will Improve Your Pain and Your Mood

Your diet can have a big impact on your overall mood and your pain.

When you are getting the right nutrition, you won’t feel tired.

You will be able to get through your day without reaching for sugary, calorie-laden snacks. Eating well helps your mind and body.

Pain management can be a difficult process. When you are in pain, dealing with the pain can produce a negative mood. Eating healthy gives your body the tools it needs to feel better. When you have the right nutrients, your pain levels will decrease. You will have less inflammation in your body when you stay away from foods laden with sugar. Over time, your mood will improve the longer you eat healthier. If you are suffering in pain and aren’t sure what to do, it’s time to look at dietary changes you can make to feel better.

Talk with your doctor about what is best for you.

You should be checked for any deficiencies like vitamin d,b vitamins , folate, iron, magnesium, niacin, if you have a clit disorder talk to your doctor about how much or how little greens you should have or avoid, if on a statin as about supplements like coq10 and krill oil.

We have one body and it wants to heal…..

Stay tuned for part 2

Posted in Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Education, Osteonecrosis, Steinberg Stages

Steinberg Stages

Many who suffer with Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis are unaware of the many stages the disease progresses to

This will be helpful so the patient and doctor can have a better idea if what form of treatment or surgical procedure would be best for the patient.

As a patient myself with Osteonecrosis in my knee I make it a point to educate myself and help others learn about the various

Stages

And

Treatments

So they can make the best decision for their own well being.

Steinberg Staging Of Avascular Necrosis/ Osteonecrosis

Steinberg staging of avascular necrosis of hip is a commonly used system similar to the

Ficat and Arlet staging

History and etymology

It is based on the radiographic appearance and location of lesion. It primarily differs from the other systems by quantifying the involvement of femoral head which allows direct comparison between series1. Seven stages of involvement are identified. Following staging, extent of involvement of femoral head is recorded as mild, moderate or severe.

Classification

stage 0: normal or non-diagnostic radiographs, MRI and bone scan of at risk hip (often contralateral hip involved, or patient has risk factors and hip pain)

stage I: normal radiograph, abnormal bone scan and/or MRI

stage II: cystic and sclerotic radiographic changes

stage III: subchondral lucency or crescent sign

stage IV: flattening of femoral head, with depression graded into

mild: <2 mm

moderate: 2-4 mm

severe: >4 mm

stage V: joint space narrowing with or without acetabular involvement

stage VI: advanced degenerative changes

Quantification of extent of involvement is necessary for stages I to V:

stage I and II

A, mild: <15% head involvement as seen on radiograph or MRI

B, moderate: 15% to 30%

C, severe: >30%

stage III

A, mild: subchondral collapse (crescent) beneath <15% of articular surface

B, moderate: crescent beneath 15% to 30%

C, severe: crescent beneath >30%

stage IV

A, mild: <15% of surface has collapsed and depression is <2mm

B, moderate: 15% to 30% collapsed or 2 to 4mm depression

C, severe: >30% collapsed or >4mm depression

stage V

A, B or C: average of femoral head involvement, as determined in stage IV, and estimated acetabular involvement.

Steinberg Staging Osteonecrosis

See also

Avascular Necrosis Of The Hip

Fixated and Arlet Staging

Legg-Calvé Perthes Disease

AVN CharityUK

Education On Steinberg Stages

https://avascularnecrosiseducation.wordpress.com/2018/06/26/steinberg-stages-of-osteonecrosis-avascular-necrosis/

References

1. Steinberg ME, Hayken GD, Steinberg DR. A quantitative system for staging avascular necrosis. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1995;77 (1): 34-41. Pubmed citation