Posted in Awareness, Bone Health, boredom, covid19, Eat Healthy, exercise, Health, Healthier, Heart Health, Life

Trying To Protect Our Health & Becoming Unhealthy

Another day of self-isolating, which means it’s potentially another day of sitting indoors restlessly taking yet another Zoom class, practicing social distancing from the frig.

Prolonged sitting is an unavoidable reality for many. And with us spending more time inside, as the pandemic continues, it’s inevitable that we’re spending even more time being sedentary.

We are staying home more we’re trying to protect our health but all this sitting, eating , isolation is making us unhealthy in other ways.

Excessive sitting can lead to depression, chronic pain and increased risk of physical injury, according to research. That’s why it’s important for us to become aware of our sitting habits and do what we can to counteract them now before we conform and resort to eating , boredom as our new norm and then your pants won’t fit.

I understand its hard to stay home, we end up sitting around, but hey you don’t have to.

Check out the links below

Stay safe-Stay healthy-And use caution and practice social distance when heading out

 

Here is a great Link about Sitting and the Dangers

https://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/ss/slideshow-sitting-health

 

I really like videos of Bob and Brad – Leslie Sansone and Shaun T

 

7 Necessary Stretches for the Inflexible! Complete Beginners Flexibility Routine by Bob and Brad

https://youtu.be/W0thJZtUgrA

 

Stretches – Daily Stretch Routine for Beginners Using a Towel and a Chair.

https://youtu.be/2x8O_mpvY68

 

Basic Beginner Cardio Workout

https://youtu.be/_7yB-UcF3-s

 

10 minute Cize work out – Shaun T

https://youtu.be/TmzgZoY7O1A

 

Walk Away The Pounds 1 Mile | Walk at Home – Leslie Sansone – 1 mile at home

https://youtu.be/ECxnTuzZ614

2 Mile Walk – from the 4 Mile Power Walk Workout – Leslie Sansone

https://youtu.be/p2ggHwtb-Zg

img_2955

 

 

 

Walking at Home American Heart Association 3 Mile Walk – Leslie Sansone

https://youtu.be/DYuw4f1c4xs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Eat Healthy, exercise, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, Positivity, spondylolisthesis, Uncategorized, Weather

Bones

It still looks like winter out in NE Ohio today even though it’s

07 April 2018.

This is what I woke up to . But I also woke up to pain as well. I mean every bone in my body hurts today.

It’s weird hearing the birds of spring singing away while there is a fresh 3 inches of snow on the ground.

Still be chilled to the bone during winter and now spring is bad for the bones , very little sun, less exercise outdoors, and the drastic swings in the temperature are also painful. One day it’s rainy and 50 today it’s snowy and 30.

I try to stay moving in spite of the weather by riding my recumbent bike.

But I would really like to get outside and breath some fresh air.

On average Ohio has 60 sunny days a year and about 90 partly sunny days a year ( I think that’s a bit high as well)

And Orlando Florida has 233 sunny days a year. That’s a big difference.

No wonder why we have to take vitamin D supplements here.

I’d still prefer to get my vitamin D the natural way.

Less sun means that your body is making less Vitamin D. Vitamin D is produced when sunlight hits the skin and triggers a series of chemical reactions to produce Vitamin D.

People like me in northern latitudes with less year round sun exposure have to be very mindful of the fact that our bodies do not produce this essential vitamin in large enough quantities. In order to counteract the lack of sunlight, more Vitamin D supplements should be consumed during the winter months in order to keep the bones healthy and strong.

A healthy balanced diet will help you build strong bones from an early age and maintain them throughout your life.

We need sufficient calcium to strengthen our bones and vitamin D to help your body absorb calcium.

Poor bone health can cause conditions such as rickets and osteoporosis and increase the risk of breaking a bone from a fall later in life.

You should be able to get all the nutrients you need for healthy bones by eating healthy.

A good diet is only one of the building blocks for healthy bones, we need physical activity and a little bit of weight lifting.

Food for Strong Bones

A healthy balanced diet will help you build strong bones from an early age and maintain them throughout your life.

You need sufficient calcium to strengthen your bones and vitamin D to help your body absorb calcium.

Poor bone health can cause conditions such as rickets and osteoporosis and increase the risk of breaking a bone from a fall.

Requirements

Adults need 700mg of calcium a day. You should be able to get all the calcium you need by eating a varied and balanced diet.

Good sources of calcium include:

• milk, cheese,yogurt eggs and other dairy foods

• green leafy vegetables, such as broccoli, cabbage and okra, collards,asparagus, artichokes , peas.

• soybeans

• tofu

• nuts

• fish like tuna and salmon and also fish where you eat the bones, such as sardines and pilchards

Although spinach might appear to contain a lot of calcium, it also contains oxalic acid, which reduces calcium absorption, and it is therefore not a good source of calcium.

It is difficult to get all the vitamin D we need from our diet and we get most of our vitamin D from the action of the sun on our skin.

Winter and early springs temperatures can bring on a gloomy mood, sending your body into chronic stress and that triggers the production of cortisol . Cortisol destroyer of bone

Clouds the mood buster.

So yes I can’t wait for sun and warmer temperatures

Warm weather improves more than just your mood.

It turns out that warm, sunny weather actually boosts brain function in multiple ways. The study found that the more time people spent outdoors in the spring, the better their memory, cognitive function, and mood.

So I am anxiously awaiting spring to finally arrive. My bones will be so glad when the weather gets warmer.

At least the Sun is out today.

Just remember if you have bone problems take care of yourself and eat healthy.

I will probably have a heating pad on my knee later but for now I am just going to try and keep busy.

And enjoying the beautiful winter/spring day hopefully for the day until next winter.

#Osteonecrosis

#Osteoarthritis

#Spondylolisthesis

#BoneHealth

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Energy, exercise, Factor V Leiden, Food Is Thy Medicine, Heart Disease, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Positivity, SONK, StopTheClot, Thoughts, Uncategorized, Vision, Weather, WegoHealth, Winter, Women

1 year ago I decided to take my health back

Happy Anniversary To My Health….

I was always pretty healthy ….until I wasn’t.

I gained weight , injured my knee gained more weight was diagnosed with one thing after another and it was really exhausting.

First osteoarthritis and hypothyroidism at age 45

They torn meniscus age 51

Then thanks to the meniscus tear Osteonecrosis set in my knee….

Then she 53 diagnosed officially with spondylolisthesis and a bilateral pars fracture

I had the spondylolisthesis before but my former PCP never told me I had it. But I seen it on an old Mri.

The pain every where was exhausting and some days it still is.

But I decided the heck with all these doctors and I decided to eat mostly plant based but I do still eat chicken fish or turkey now and then and rarely beef.

I ride my recumbent bike 2x a day and I walk when I can. And some days even when I should rest I go walk anyway.

Today’s pictures and videos are from my morning walk : and it’s also one year ago I quit smoking……so it’s a great day !

Pain or no pain I’m not going to just sit around.

Sitting is death

Moving is life

And ya know after I’m done I feel so much better.

1 year since I’ve quit smoking after being a smoker for 40 years. My lungs are feel better my walking speed has improved my distance has improved

1 year since I started eating a healthy mostly plant based but I’m not a vegan and it’s good clean healthy real colorful food . I am using food as medicine in a way to fight pain and inflammation . Now sure I eat a cookie or 2 now and then just not every day. And all my other choices are good so I don’t deprive myself of a treat now and then.

And for having Osteonecrosis,Osteoarthritis, Spondylolisthesis with a bilateral pats fracture in my L5 S1 I feel pretty darn good today even in this cold weather.

Just need to drop some weight one step and one day at a time.

I have taken my life back and no one is going to stop me !

Tomorrow I may be in pain and that’s ok. I can accept that but as long as I know I am doing all I can to combat my pain and keep my body moving and providing it with the best nutrients possible(most of the time)

It’s a win win for me ,one day at a time !

Keep your meds , keep your cigarettes keep your junk fast food.

Body Heal Thy Self

Posted in Ancestry, Disclaimer, exercise, History, Meditation, Mindfulness, Thank You, Thoughts, Uncategorized, Weather, Winter

A Treasure In My Home Town- A Need Your Vote

I love Millcreek Park

It’s located in Youngstown Ohio-and I Love Lanterman’s Mill

Link to vote for my photo

Link to vote

http://woobox.com/bq82rg/gallery/bXZRTqzp9Kc

Voting ends 12/20/2017

Lanterman’s Mill One of Mahoning County’s most historic landmarks, Lanterman’s Mill was built in 1845-46 by German Lanterman and Samuel Kimberly. Restored in 1982-85 through a gift from the Ward and Florence Beecher Foundations, this community treasure represents one of the many pioneer industries developed along Mill Creek and operates today as it did in the 1800s, grinding corn, wheat, and buckwheat.

Visit Lanterman’s Mill and step into the past. Observe the pioneer ingenuity involved in the early production of meal and flour, smell the sweet aroma of freshly ground grains, and feel the rumbling vibrations of the massive stones as the various grains are ground. You can also Browse the gift shop located in the Mill to find unique items and charming wares made by local artisans. They have stone-ground cornmeal, buckwheat, and whole wheat flour that are preservative-free and can be purchased in the gift shop and at local participating stores.

You can Call them at 330.740.7115 for information regarding their stone-ground flours and meal. Download a brochure for delicious recipes using your Lanterman’s Mill products.

Here’s a picture I took today while walking. My walk wasn’t to long today because it was only 15 degrees Fahrenheit out.

And a quick video.

Photo and video taken by me

Deborah Andio

Posted in Awareness, Blessed, Coping with Stress, Energy, exercise, Faith, family, God, Happiness

Stress-Anxiety & How To Cope

Holidays seem to cause people more stress.

Maybe they are missing a loved one.

Maybe they are working and going to school.

Maybe they are trying to stretch their dollar to pay bills and find a way to buy gifts.

Maybe they already suffer from depression and holidays just add to that depression.

Maybe they suffer from alcohol or drug addiction or food addiction and all the parties whether it’s a work party family gathering often unfortunately includes alcohol and food and lately drugs.

Or all of the above.

It seems today so many people young and old lack good coping skills.

Learning how to cope properly can go a long way for your everyday health. Let’s face it Stress is a health killer.

And it can lead to addiction if your trying to “escape” all the stress and anxiety but medicating whether it’s by food, alcohol, drugs won’t help it will in fact make things worse .

Here, are some of the the best and worst ways to de-stress right now.

And don’t be afraid to reach out to someone and talk about it. A qualified professional counselor or pastor or social worker can help.

BEST WAYS GET SOME FRESH AIR

Research shows that the vitamin D boost from sunlight may elevate your levels of feel-good serotonin. And, taking in the sights, sounds, and smells around you redirects your focus from your worries.

GET OUT OF YOUR HEAD

Do you ever get that never-ending loop of negative thoughts and what-ifs playing in your head?

That’s because stress likes to mess with your mind. A surefire and fun way to get out of your head is to engage in activities that put the focus on your hands or body (think kneading bread, sketching a picture, knitting a scarf, find a craft . As your hands and fingers begin to fall into those familiar rhythmic moves, it sends a signal to your brain that immediately relaxes you and makes you feel grounded.

So immerse yourself in a creative, engaging activity and get ready to press the mute button.

CONNECT TO YOUR SPIRITUAL SIDE

For many centuries, religious groups and native tribes worldwide have used prayer beads to guide their spiritual practice, and research shows that spirituality boosts mood

Buy a set of prayer beads or make your own, and then create a positive affirmation or mantra that resonates with you.

It’s not about religion it’s spiritual mindfulness

Then, next time stress hits, repeat your affirmation as you work your way around and touch each bead.

The more you go around, the more you’ll experience a sense of power and detachment from the source of anxiety as your brain switches into a meditative cadence.

Some suggestions

It’s not who you are that holds you back, it’s who you think you’re not.

We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we.

VISUALIZE CALM

Find a quiet space, close your eyes, focus your breathing, and transport yourself to your happy place for a few minutes each day. Research from the University of California, Los Angeles shows your body actually produces less of the stress hormone cortisol when engaging in guided imagery

There are plenty of books and articles written on the subject if you need help getting started, but the most important thing is to find a comforting and calming image that works for you (a beautiful blue ocean might be totally relaxing to one person, but a nightmare for someone who’s afraid of water).

Find a beautiful nature picture that makes you happy and use it.

TAKE A BATH

Water has an innate soothing effect on the mind and body since it connects us back to our time in the womb,

Schedule a regular time to soak in the tub. Further your bliss by pairing your bath with scented bath beads.

Pick a scent that smells best to you or go for lavender or jasmine, both of which possess stress-reducing properties.

Just 5-10 minutes can help your stress.

MY FAVORITE EXPRESS YOUR GRATITUDE

Studies have revealed the positive effects of expressing gratitude. While studying brain activity, National Institutes of Health researchers found subjects who showed more gratitude had higher levels of activity in the hypothalamus, a part of the brain that has a huge influence on our stress levels.

Plus, gratefulness also activated the regions associated with dopamine, one of those feel-good neurotransmitters. To reap these stress-reducing benefits, write down your feelings of gratitude daily in a journal, or by sending little notes to friends or family letting them know how much you appreciate them. I do try to tell my family I love you and I’m grateful every day.

EXERCISE

Exercise may be the healthiest stress buster : it revs your body’s production of feel-good endorphins, it can help regulate your sleep, lowers the symptoms associated with mild depression, boosts your energy, and helps you remain calmer and more focused, all of which can go a long way toward stress management. While it’s easy to let a daily exercise routine slide when you’re overwhelmed, take steps to incorporate it daily.

WORST THINGS YOU CAN DO : DRINKING, SMOKING, DRUGS AND OTHER VICES

Drowning your stress in a bottle of wine or a pack of cigarettes or a pill or a line might seem to bring a release in the moment, but turning to unhealthy vices like drinking, drugs, smoking, or even too much caffeine only sets you up to stress out more once the high wears off. And will lead to addiction and possibly death.

Since these habits tend to increase the Negative Impact stress is already having on your body (raising your blood pressure, making you jittery, moody, feeling lost, keeping you awake at night to name just a few), you enter into a vicious cycle of feeling more stressed out and then returning to the vice over and over.

DONT HIBERNATE

The thought of hiding away under the covers sounds pretty great when there’s so much to deal with beyond your bedroom door, but sleeping too much isn’t the answer. Studies show that the more you sleep, the more tired you actually feel.

Increased lethargy is only going to make it that much harder for you to focus and much less likely to deal with the stressors at hand.

Plus, studies that have shown an association between chronic oversleeping and diabetes, heart disease, weight gain, and even higher rates of death (though it’s unclear if too much sleep causes these problems).

Adding health problems to your already heavy load is only going to exacerbate your stress levels.

DONT DWELL ON THE NEGATIVE

If you make a mistake at work, or school or home do you assume you’re going to get fired? Do you think you’re going to fail?

Have a fight with your spouse or significant other and worry the relationship may be over?

It’s not uncommon to jump to worst-case scenarios when dealing with an upsetting issue, but blowing things out of proportion only intensifies your stressed. When we’re feeling stressed it’s very easy to view ourselves in a negative light, . Way to soften your inner chatter, goes to negative focus on positive I suggest looking at things from a different perspective. Talk to yourself as if you were offering advice to your best friend and odds are you’ll have much more compassionate and positive things to say.

DONT EAT YOUR FEELINGS

Like alcohol or drugs, food often becomes a crutch when coping with difficult times. I’ve been guilty of this.

Soothing your pain with a high-calorie, high-sugar, or high-fat comfort foods feels good at first, but it can quickly spiral out of control when your mind and body begin to associate negative emotions with eating.

At the first sign of stress, anger, or sadness you’ll instinctively reach for food rather than dealing with the feelings at hand.

Overeating can cause weight gain and make you feel worse about yourself.

DONT IGNORE THE PROBLEM

While it’s normal to take a mental time out once in a while to watch a funny movie or meet a friend for lunch, consistently avoiding the stress in your life is counterproductive.

When you evade your problems, you don’t allow yourself to process or understand what you’re dealing with.

The more you ignore something whether it’s a concrete problem like paying off bills or an emotional one like the fear of losing a job the greater it’s going to get.

Your best bet is to reach out for help and make a plan of action that will eventually diminish your problems and alleviate your stress.

Talk to a counselor , a pastor, a family member.

There is nothing to be ashamed of or embarrassed by in asking for help. We don’t judge you.

We are humans and we make mistakes and we get stressed and we feel stuck sometimes.

But we’re not stuck.

Please reach out to a professional if you feel the stress in your life is overwhelming.

And if no one has said it to you today.

Your a wonderful person who is going through a hard time. You can and will get through this. Believe in yourself. Like I believe in you.

God Bless You.

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, exercise, Factor V Leiden, Food Is Thy Medicine, Inflammation, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Pain, Positivity, Uncategorized, Weather, Winter

Knee Pain In The Winter

Knees not feeling great this time of year?
Do you need a thermometer to let you know when the temperatures change outside?
Or do your joints painfully serve as your weather forecast? Unfortunately, for many who suffer from osteoarthritis or other inflammatory conditions, cold weather can cause havoc on already vulnerable parts of your body.
What causes the pain?
The Barometric pressure drops in winter. Researchers believe that when this happens, inflamed areas of our bodies (knees, hips, hands, elbows, and shoulders) swell. Swelling can irritate nerves, which results in increased pain.

Also low vitamin D levels add to pain

You may need more of the sunshine vitamin, suggests new research from the Clinical Journal of Pain.

Compared to those osteoarthritis sufferers with adequate vitamin D levels, those short on D reported significantly more knee pain and loss of function, according to the study data. Those results held regardless of a person’s weight, although the obese study participants were more likely to suffer from a vitamin D deficiency.

There are several different ways low D might mess with your knees, roughly 42% of Americans are dangerously low when it comes to vitamin D. You get most of your D from sun exposure.

A simple blood test from your doctor can determine whether you’re low in the vitamin, If you’re deficient, taking a vitamin D supplement for several months can help you raise your levels. While it’s difficult to get too much D, the amount you need depends on your weight and body composition. Your body stores vitamin D in the fat cells, meaning those with greater amounts of body fat require more of the vitamin to limit pain and loss of function.

Another good reason to keep vitamin D levels in good range is low D doubles your risk for dementia.

Ways to Keep knees warm and ease pain this winter
Thermacare heat wraps
I love these they help pain and keep my joints warm which allows me to move easier

Eat a balanced diet I have personally had great pain relief since changing to mostly plant based diet.

Follow a healthy diet by including seasonal fruits, vegetables, nuts grains,seeds .

It is essential for people who are already suffering from joint and knee pain to include foods rich in Vitamin K, D and C (like oranges, spinach, cabbage and tomatoes) into their diet; as they play an important role in the production of cartilage and helps the body absorb calcium thus strengthening the bones.

I also have learned hydration is also important for pain relief. Try to drink plenty of water or herbal teas, like nettle tea , chamomile ,ginger tea as our dehydration reduces flexibility, which can increase the chances of injury. Supplements with vitamin D or fish oil is recommended as it is rich in omega 3 which helps decrease inflammation. Stay away from unhealthy drinks. Alcohol, tea, coffee, and other aerated drinks reduce the amount of calcium you absorb, and weaken bones.

Swap your caffeine-fuelled drinks with water and fresh juices.

Stay Active
Exercise regularly. It not only helps you lose weight but also increases flexibility and strengthens the muscles that support the knee ( walking, swimming or cycling). Your knees experience about three to four times your body weight when you walk, so lose weight to help your knees.
Always check with your Doctor before starting any new exercise.

Fun Fact :

Keep your feet warm. Your big toe is your body’s thermostat, so keep it warm and your whole body will be warm.

.

Posted in Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Chronic Pain, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, exercise, Factor V Leiden, Flush not Blush, Food, Gluten Free, Happiness, Herbal, Homemade Syrups,Tinctures,Rubs, Inflammation, Meditation, Mindfulness, OA, Osteonecrosis, Positivity, Rosacea, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Support Group, Hope, Uncategorized, Vegetables, Vision

Get To Know Me

Hi, I'm Debbie and I have Avascular Necrosis/Osteonecrosis, It's a rare disease/disorder where you have a temporary or permanent loss of blood supply to the bone.
I developed my avascular necrosis/osteonecrosis after I suffered a meniscal tear. I'm lucky and very grateful because the doctors don't feel it will go to any other joints . Others including small children are not so fortunate.

We need more research on so many levels and trials.

I love to learn.
I love to educate
I love to help people realize their is always hope.
I have started to go to a more plant-based diet to help the pain caused by inflammation.

However I still will eat meat once a week no more than 2x a week.

I also personally take supplements all ok'd by my PCP

Vitamin D varies from 2000 to 5000 iu a day based on lab results

CoQ10 400mg a day

CuraMed Curcumin 375mg my
Ortho had me start with 1 in a.m and 1 in p.m for the first week, then take 1 a day.

Krill Oil – Not Fish oil
I buy Antarctic Krill Oil Platinum by 1MD because it's top quality.

Krill and fish oil similarly contain EPA and DHA, but they differ in the way that the omegas are bonded. The omegas in krill oil are mostly bonded to phospholipids while in fish oil they are bonded to triglycerides. The fat cells in humans are also in phospholipid form. A study done on the metabolic effects of krill oil concluded that the omega-3s from krill oil may be more readily and effectively absorbed after ingestion and distribution into the bloodstream.

I have gone from eating food that really wasn't that healthy to eating mostly plants real food. To help my body by giving it the best nutrients possible.
I have to say my pain has decreased.
I will have a cheat day now and then.
But when you get used to eating good healthy food anything other than that just doesn't taste as good.

So I will be posting various recipes on my main blog and sometimes here as well , ones that I tried and loved as well as some information about myself and about Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis and a few other things

I Research a lot of things
Osteoarthritis
Osteonecrosis
Spondylolisthesis
Factor V Leiden Heterogeneous
Hypothyroidism
Rosecea
Clinical Trials
Stem Cell and Prolotherapy

I love history and being outdoors

One thing I know I will do again someday is hike . Since diagnosed with Avn I haven't lived or hiked as much as I used to do to limitations because of bone problems.

I love learning and applying new things into my own life.

I truly believe we can help our pain and diminish symptoms and heal our own body most of the time if not all the time.

We just need the right tools and the know how.

My Links

Facebook Main Profile https://m.facebook.com/public/Deborah-Andio

Main Blog ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com

YouTube Awareness Videos https://m.youtube.com/user/debbieandio

New Blog on Google 3/8/2017 http://chronicallygratefuldebla.blogspot.com/2017/03/hello-i-am-debbie-andio-i-am-blogger.html

Link to Mini Fact Videos http://cortanavideo.trade/user/UC1RtmEwtWKC8w9EgE2IwOFg

Twitter https://mobile.twitter.com/debbiea001

Instagram https://www.instagram.com/debbiea_1962

FB Information and Awareness Pages Bone info and Joint of the Day https://m.facebook.com/AvascularNecrosisRareDiseaseDayFeb29/

ON/AVN https://m.facebook.com/Osteonecrosis-Avascular-Necrosis-Support-913679995417381/

ON/AVN https://m.facebook.com/ONAvascular-Necrosis-Knowledge-752404224891578/

Recipes https://m.facebook.com/YummyGoodness/

Facebook Link https://m.facebook.com/ChronicallyGrateful.Me/

NewMorning Talk Anyone who wants to do a f b live via a guest message me. Various topics health, pain, food https://m.facebook.com/MorningTalk.Healh/

Posted in Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Diagnosed, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, exercise, Factor V Leiden, Food, Hacks, Happiness, Herbal, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, Music, OA, Osteonecrosis, Positivity, Uncategorized, Vision

Various Relaxation Techniques

See full Disclaimer at bottom
of the post

Here is a partial
Disclaimer
Usage Policy

The information provided on this website is for educational purposes only. By using the website you are participating at your own risk.

With so much stress that comes with having a chronic condition and the world we live in is full of several fast paced situations , hurry here, hurry there , doctor appointments, tests,people with little to no patience and they want us to move a bit faster!
Excuse You! But I have a bone disease and I am going as fast as I can.
People judging us
It can be overwhelming
It's no wonder at the end of a day we can't sleep.

I think personally everyone needs to learn how to just open our mind relax and chill a little.

Relaxation Techniques
Using the Relaxation Response to Relieve Stress

For many of us, relaxation means zoning out in front of the TV at the end of a stressful day.

But this does little to reduce the damaging effects of stress.

To effectively combat stress, we need to activate the body's natural relaxation response.
You can do this by practicing relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation, rhythmic exercise, and yoga or chair yoga if you are challenged with Bone and joint issues.

Fitting these activities into your life can help reduce everyday stress, boost your energy and mood, and improve your mental and physical health..

What is the relaxation response? Well based on what I have read …
When stress overwhelms your nervous system, your body is flooded with chemicals that prepare you for "fight or flight."
This stress response can be lifesaving in emergency situations where you need to act quickly.
But when it’s constantly activated by the stresses of everyday life, it can wear your body down and take a toll on your emotional health.

No one can avoid all stress, but you can counteract its detrimental effects by learning how to produce the relaxation response, a state of deep rest that is the polar opposite of the stress response. The relaxation response puts the brakes on stress and brings your body and mind back into a state of equilibrium.
When the relaxation response is activated, your:
heart rate slows down
breathing becomes slower and deeper
blood pressure drops or stabilizes
muscles relax
blood flow to the brain increases

In addition to its calming physical effects, the relaxation response also increases energy and focus, combats illness, relieves aches and pains, heightens problem-solving abilities, and boosts motivation and productivity. Best of all, anyone can reap these benefits with regular practice.
How to produce the relaxation response
Simply laying on the couch, reading, or watching TV while sometimes relaxing isn’t going to produce the physical and psychological benefits of the relaxation response. For that, you’ll need to actively practice a relaxation technique.
Finding the relaxation technique that’s best for you may be interesting because there is no single relaxation technique that is best for everyone.
So I am going to touch base on a few and post their YouTube links below.

The right relaxation technique is the one that resonates with you, fits your lifestyle, and is able to focus your mind and interrupt your everyday thoughts to elicit the relaxation response. You may even find that alternating or combining different techniques provide the best results.

How you react to stress may also influence the relaxation technique that works best for you:

The “fight” response. If you tend to become angry, agitated, or keyed up under stress, you will respond best to stress relief activities that quiet you down, such as meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, deep breathing, or guided imagery.
The “flight” response. If you tend to become depressed, withdrawn, or spaced out under stress, you will respond best to stress relief activities that are stimulating and energize your nervous system, such as rhythmic exercise, massage, mindfulness, or power yoga.

The immobilization response. If you’ve experienced some type of trauma and tend to “freeze” or become “stuck” under stress, your challenge is to first rouse your nervous system to a fight or flight response (above) so you can employ the applicable stress relief techniques.
To do this, choose physical activity that engages both your arms and legs, such as running, dancing, or tai chi, and perform it mindfully, focusing on the sensations in your limbs as you move.

Deep breathing
With its focus on full, cleansing breaths, deep breathing is a simple yet powerful relaxation technique. It’s easy to learn, can be practiced almost anywhere, and provides a quick way to get your stress levels in check. Deep breathing is the cornerstone of many other relaxation practices, too, and can be combined with other relaxing elements such as aromatherapy and music. All you really need is a few minutes and a place to stretch out.
How to practice deep breathing
The key to deep breathing is to breathe deeply from the abdomen, getting as much fresh air as possible in your lungs. When you take deep breaths from the abdomen, rather than shallow breaths from your upper chest, you inhale more oxygen. The more oxygen you get, the less tense, short of breath, and anxious you feel.
Sit comfortably with your back straight. Put one hand on your chest and the other on your stomach.
Breathe in through your nose. The hand on your stomach should rise. The hand on your chest should move very little.
Exhale through your mouth, pushing out as much air as you can while contracting your abdominal muscles. The hand on your stomach should move in as you exhale, but your other hand should move very little.
Continue to breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth. Try to inhale enough so that your lower abdomen rises and falls. Count slowly as you exhale.

If you find it difficult breathing from your abdomen while sitting up, try lying down. Put a small book on your stomach, and breathe so that the book rises as you inhale and falls as you exhale.

Progressive muscle relaxation
Progressive muscle relaxation is a two-step process in which you systematically tense and relax different muscle groups in the body. With regular practice, it gives you an intimate familiarity with what tension as well as complete relaxation feels like in different parts of the body. This can help you to you react to the first signs of the muscular tension that accompanies stress. And as your body relaxes, so will your mind.

Progressive muscle relaxation can be combined with deep breathing for additional stress relief.
Practicing progressive muscle relaxation
Consult with your doctor first if you have a history of muscle spasms, back problems, or other serious injuries that may be aggravated by tensing muscles.
Start at your feet and work your way up to your face, trying to only tense those muscles intended.
1. Loosen clothing, take off your shoes, and get comfortable.
2. Take a few minutes to breathe in and out in slow, deep breaths.
3. When you’re ready, shift your attention to your right foot. Take a moment to focus on the way it feels.
4. Slowly tense the muscles in your right foot, squeezing as tightly as you can. Hold for a count of 10.
5. Relax your foot. Focus on the tension flowing away and how your foot feels as it becomes limp and loose.
6. Stay in this relaxed state for a moment, breathing deeply and slowly.
7. Shift your attention to your left foot. Follow the same sequence of muscle tension and release.
8. Move slowly up through your body, contracting and relaxing the different muscle groups.
9. It may take some practice at first, but try not to tense muscles other than those intended.

Mindfulness meditation
Rather than worrying about the future or dwelling on the past, mindfulness meditation switches the focus to what’s happening right now, enabling you to be fully engaged in the present moment.

Meditations that cultivate mindfulness have long been used to reduce stress, anxiety, depression, and other negative emotions. Some of these meditations bring you into the present by focusing your attention on a single repetitive action, such as your breathing, a few repeated words, or the flickering light of a candle. Other forms of mindfulness meditation encourage you to follow and then release internal thoughts or sensations. Mindfulness can also be applied to activities such as walking, exercising, or eating.
A basic mindfulness exercise:
1. Sit on a straight-backed chair or cross-legged on the floor.
2. Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling.
3. Once you've narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations, and thoughts.
4. Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.

Body scan meditation
This is a type of meditation that that focuses your attention on various parts of your body. Like progressive muscle relaxation, you start with your feet and work your way up. But instead of tensing and relaxing muscles, you simply focus on the way each part of your body feels, without labeling the sensations as either “good” or “bad”.
Practicing body scan meditation
Lie on your back, legs uncrossed, arms relaxed at your sides, eyes open or closed. Focus on your breathing for about two minutes until you start to feel relaxed.
Turn your focus to the toes of your right foot. Notice any sensations you feel while continuing to also focus on your breathing. Imagine each deep breath flowing to your toes. Remain focused on this area for one to two minutes.
Move your focus to the sole of your right foot. Tune in to any sensations you feel in that part of your body and imagine each breath flowing from the sole of your foot. After one or two minutes, move your focus to your right ankle and repeat. Move to your calf, knee, thigh, hip, and then repeat the sequence for your left leg. From there, move up the torso, through the lower back and abdomen, the upper back and chest, and the shoulders. Pay close attention to any area of the body that causes you pain or discomfort.
After completing the body scan, relax for a while in silence and stillness, noting how your body feels. Then slowly open your eyes and stretch, if necessary.
Rhythmic movement and mindful exercise
The idea of exercising may not sound particularly soothing, but rhythmic exercise that gets you into a flow of repetitive movement can be very relaxing. Examples include:
Running
Walking
Swimming
Dancing
Rowing
Climbing
For maximum stress relief, add mindfulness to your workout
While simply engaging in rhythmic exercise will help you relieve stress, if you add a mindfulness component on top, you’ll get even more benefit.
As with meditation, mindful exercise requires being fully engaged in the present moment—paying attention to how your body feels right now, rather than your daily worries or concerns. In order to “turn off” your thoughts, focus on the sensations in your limbs and how your breathing complements your movement.
If you’re walking or running, for example, focus on the sensation of your feet touching the ground, the rhythm of your breath, and the feeling of the wind against your face. If your mind wanders to other thoughts, gently return to focusing on your breathing and movement.
Visualization
Visualization, or guided imagery, is a variation on traditional meditation that involves imagining a scene in which you feel at peace, free to let go of all tension and anxiety. Choose whatever setting is most calming to you, whether it’s a tropical beach, a favorite childhood spot, or a quiet wooded glen.
You can practice visualization on your own or with a therapist (or an audio recording of a therapist) guiding you through the imagery. You can also choose to do your visualization in silence or use listening aids, such as soothing music or a sound machine or recording that matches your chosen setting—the sound of ocean waves if you’ve chosen a beach, for example.
Practicing visualization
Close your eyes and imagine your restful place. Picture it as vividly as you can—everything you can see, hear, smell, taste, and feel. Just “looking” at it like you would a photograph is not enough. Visualization works best if you incorporate as many sensory details as possible.
For example, if you are thinking about a dock on a quiet lake:
See the sun setting over the water
Hear the birds singing
Smell the pine trees
Feel the cool water on your bare feet
Taste the fresh, clean air
Enjoy the feeling of your worries drifting away as you slowly explore your restful place. When you are ready, gently open your eyes and come back to the present.
Don't worry if you sometimes zone out or lose track of where you are during a visualization session. This is normal. You may also experience feelings of heaviness in your limbs, muscle twitches, or yawning. Again, these are normal responses.
Yoga and tai chi
Yoga involves a series of both moving and stationary poses, combined with deep breathing. As well as reducing anxiety and stress, yoga can also improve flexibility, strength, balance, and stamina. Since injuries can happen when yoga is practiced incorrectly, it’s best to learn by attending group classes, hiring a private teacher, or at least following video instructions. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others, tailoring your practice as you see fit.

If you’re unsure whether a specific yoga class is appropriate for stress relief, call the studio or ask the teacher.
Tai chi
If you’ve seen a group of people in the park slowly moving in synch, you’ve probably witnessed tai chi. Tai chi is a self-paced, non-competitive series of slow, flowing body movements. By focusing your mind on the movements and your breathing, you keep your attention on the present, which clears the mind and leads to a relaxed state.
Tai chi is a safe, low-impact option for people of all ages and fitness levels, including older adults and those recovering from injuries. As with yoga, it's best learned in a class or from a private instructor. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others.
Self-massage
You’re probably already aware how much a professional massage at a spa or health club can help reduce stress, relieve pain, and ease muscle tension. What you may not be aware of is that you can experience many of the same benefits at home or work by practicing self-massage—or trading massages with a loved one.
Try taking a few minutes to massage yourself at your desk between tasks, on the couch at the end of a hectic day, or in bed to help you unwind before sleep. To enhance relaxation, you can use aromatic oil, scented lotion, or combine self-message with mindfulness or deep breathing techniques.

Starting a regular relaxation practice
Learning the basics of these relaxation techniques isn’t difficult, but it takes regular practice to truly harness their stress-relieving power. Most stress experts recommend setting aside at least 10 to 20 minutes a day for your relaxation practice. If you’d like to maximize the benefits, aim for 30 minutes to an hour.
Tips for making relaxation techniques part of your life
Set aside time in your daily schedule. If possible, schedule a set time once or twice a day for your practice. If your schedule is already packed, remember that many relaxation techniques can be practiced while you’re doing other things. Try meditating while commuting on the bus or train, taking a yoga or tai chi break at lunchtime, or practicing mindful walking while exercising your dog.
Don't practice when you're sleepy. These techniques are so relaxing that they can make you very sleepy. However, you will get the most benefit if you practice when you’re fully alert. Avoid practicing close to bedtime or after a heavy meal or alcohol.
Expect ups and downs. Don’t be discouraged if you skip a few days or even a few weeks. Just get started again and slowly build up to your old momentum.
If you exercise, improve the relaxation benefits by adopting mindfulness. Instead of zoning out or staring at a TV as you exercise, try focusing your attention on your body. If you’re resistance training, for example, focus on coordinating your breathing with your movements and pay attention to how your body feels as you raise and lower weights.

Here is a few links I use to
relax
reduce pain
help me sleep better

These are my favorites and I listen to it daily and a few I listen to now and then

Daily
Mindfulness
https://youtu.be/-2zdUXve6fQ

Stress Relief and Confidence
https://youtu.be/-KMngzCWgTw

Morning Meditation for Healing
https://youtu.be/q9ZR_CJhuLc

Reiki for pain relief
https://youtu.be/3nJtajgAb34

Relax Video Male Voice
https://youtu.be/_jD3VxSGM-k

https://youtu.be/oA_rY4N8XJA

Sounds for Anxiety depression
https://youtu.be/AmqDOA-JALg

Meditation Sounds for pain relief
https://youtu.be/XiNne25uMK8

To help you sleep
https://youtu.be/xQ6xgDI7Whc

Disclaimer
Usage Policy

The information provided on this website is for educational purposes only. By using the website you are participating at your own risk.
• Make sure you practise with enough free space around you. Wear comfortable clothing so you can move freely.
• Please take responsibility for your own body and include extra warm up and cool down stretches where appropriate.
• You should avoid alcohol and drugs before yoga and meditation. Also no heavy meals for two hours before practice. Keep yourself hydrated before and after your yoga practice.
• If you feel dizzy, light-headed, faint, or if you experience any other discomfort, stop exercising immediately and consult a medical doctor. You are responsible for your condition during your practice. Exercise within your limits. Never force or strain. Seek attention and advice as appropriate.
• We offer no medical advice. You should consult a medical practitioner before starting any new exercise regime. This is particularly important if you are overweight, pregnant, nursing, regularly taking medications, or have any existing medical conditions. This website may not be tailored to your current physical and mental health. We accept no liability whatsoever for any damages arising from the use of this website.
• We do not recommend that you attempt any of this or yoga exercises for the first time without suitable experience or supervision.
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Posted in Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Eat Healthy, exercise, Factor V Leiden, Inflammation, Life, Osteonecrosis, Uncategorized

Blood Supply In Bones

Osteonecrosis -Avascular Necrosis 

So what actually is Bone death anyway. 

It’s mostly of the break down in the vascular system (blood supply)that runs through the bone.
Although bone is not an actively growing tissue in adults, it does need a constant blood supply to stay alive. In fact, the supply of blood to long bones is profuse and derived from a number of sources that are explained with detail in the lines below.
Blood supply of bones

Nutrient artery:

This artery enters the shaft through the nutrient foramen and runs obliquely through the cortex. In the medullary cavity this artery divides into ascending and descending branches. Each one of these two branches divides into parallel channels that head towards the respective end of the bone. At the place of metaphyses in case of adult bones these branches anastomose with epiphyseal, metaphyseal and periosteal arteries. The nutrient artery in this way nourishes the whole medullary cavity and inner 2/3 of the cortex as well as metaphyses.
Periosteal arteries:

Periosteal arteries are the arteries of periosteum being especially numerous beneath the muscular and ligamentous attachment. Beneath the periosteum they divide into branches and thereby entering the Volkmann’s canals to supply the outer one third (1/3) portion of the cortex. Remember that the inner 2/3 of the cortex was supplied by the nutrient artery discussed above.
Epiphyseal arteries:

These are the arteries of epiphyses and are derived from the peri-articular vascular arcades found on the non-articular bony surfaces. This area also has numerous foramina out of which only few are the entrance points of these arteries while the remaining are the venous exits.
Metaphyseal arteries:

These arteries are derived from the neighboring systemic vessels. These arteries directly go into the metaphyses and reinforce the metaphyseal branches of the primary nutrient artery.

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Eat Healthy, exercise, Inflammation, OA, Osteonecrosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Uncategorized

Burning Bone Fat for Better Bones 

Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat a key to better bone health

The study, published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, also suggests obese individuals — who often have worse bone quality — may derive even greater bone health benefits from exercising than their lean counterparts.
“One of the main clinical implications of this research is that exercise is not just good, but amazing for bone health,” said lead author Maya Styner, MD, a physician and assistant professor of endocrinology and metabolism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “In just a very short period of time, we saw that running was building bone significantly in mice.”
Although research in mice is not directly translatable to the human condition, the kinds of stem cells that produce bone and fat in mice are the same kind that produce bone and fat in humans.
In addition to its implications for obesity and bone health, Styner said the research also could help illuminate some of the factors behind bone degradation associated with conditions like diabetes, arthritis, anorexia, and the use of steroid medications.
In her patients, Styner is all too familiar with the chronic toll of osteoporosis and fractures. This new evidence shows it’s possible to use exercise to reverse some of the effects on bones.
“I see a lot of patients with poor bone health, and I always talk to them about what a dramatic effect exercise can have on bones, regardless of what the cause of their bone condition is,” said Styner. “With obesity, it seems that you get even more bone formation from exercise. Our studies of bone biomechanics show that the quality and the strength of the bone is significantly increased with exercise and even more so in the obese exercisers”
Getting to the marrow of the matter
Bone and marrow are more dynamic than you might think. Marrow, in particular, is a hub of activity, coordinating the formation of bone and cartilage while simultaneously churning out blood cells, immune cells, and cancerous cells.
Marrow also produces fat, which has a lot to do with its vaunted status in cuisines around the world. But the physiological role of bone marrow fat in the body — and even whether it is beneficial or harmful for one’s health — has remained somewhat mysterious.
Generally, marrow fat has been thought to comprise a special fat reserve that is not used to fuel energy during exercise in the same way other fat stores are used throughout the body during exercise. The new study offers evidence to the contrary.
Styner’s work also offers fundamental insights on how marrow fat forms and the impact it has on bone health. Previous studies have suggested that a higher amount of marrow fat increases the risk of fractures and other problems.
“There’s been intense interest in marrow fat because it’s highly associated with states of low bone density, but scientists still haven’t understood its physiologic purpose,” said Styner. “We know that exercise has a profound effect on fat elsewhere in the body, and we wanted to use exercise as a tool to understand the fat in the marrow.”
Vanishing fat cells
The researchers performed their experiments in two groups of mice. One group was fed a normal diet (lean mice) and the other received a high-fat diet (obese mice) starting a month after birth. When they were four months old, half the mice in each group were given a running wheel to use whenever they liked for the next six weeks. Because mice like to run, the group with access to a wheel tended to spend a lot of time exercising.
The researchers analyzed the animals’ body composition, marrow fat and bone quantity at various points. Predictably, the obese mice started with more fat cells and larger fat cells in their marrow. After exercising for six weeks, both obese and lean mice showed a significant reduction in the overall size of fat cells and the overall amount fat in the marrow. In these respects, the marrow fat of exercising obese mice looked virtually identical to the marrow fat of lean mice, even those that exercised.
Perhaps more surprising was the dramatic difference in the number of fat cells present in the marrow, which showed no change in lean mice but dropped by more than half in obese mice that exercised compared to obese mice that were sedentary. The tests also revealed that exercise improved the thickness of bone, and that this effect was particularly pronounced in obese mice.
According to Styner, all of this points to the conclusion that marrow fat can be burned off through exercise and that this process is good for bones.
“Obesity appears to increase a fat depot in the bone, and this depot behaves very much like abdominal and other fat depots,” said Styner. “Exercise is able to reduce the size of this fat depot and burn it for fuel and at the same time build stronger, larger bones.”
Setting the stage
The research leaves a few lingering mysteries. A big one is figuring out the exact relationship between burning marrow fat and building better bone. It could be that when fat cells are burned during exercise, the marrow uses the released energy to make more bone. Or, because both fat and bone cells come from parent cells known as mesenchymal stem cells, it could be that exercise somehow stimulates these stem cells to churn out more bone cells and less fat cells.
More research will be needed to parse this out. “What we can say is there’s a lot of evidence suggesting that marrow fat is being used as fuel to make more bone, rather than there being an increase in the diversion of stem cells into bone,” said Styner.
But marrow fat, being encased in bone, isn’t easy to study. The team’s new research represents a leap forward not only in understanding bone marrow fat but also in the tools to study it.
The group’s previous work relied on micro CT imaging, which requires the use of a toxic tracer to measure marrow fat. In the new study, they took advantage of UNC’s 9.4 TMRI, a sophisticated MRI machine of which there are only a few around the country. Using MRI to assess marrow fat eliminates the need for the toxic tracer and allows highly detailed imaging of living organisms.
“If we want to take this technique to the human level, we could study marrow fat in humans in a much more reliable fashion now,” said Styner. “And our work shows this is possible.”
The team also developed techniques to perform a much more detailed assessment of the number and size of fat cells within the marrow, and even examined some of the key proteins involved in the formation and reduction of bone marrow fat.
Styner is now working with collaborators to adapt these methods for studying the bone marrow dynamics that might be at work in other conditions, including anorexia and post-menopausal osteoporosis.

# Exercise 

#BoneHealth

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170518140220.htm