Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Ancestry, Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Baking, Blessed, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Delicious, Desserts, Eat Healthy, Food, Foodie, Hacks, Homegrown, Inflammation, Pain, Plant, Recipes, Stevia, Sugar Alternative

I Started To Cut Out Added Sugar & Use This: Homemade Stevia Liquid

We have to cut out all the added sugar or try to cut back at least !!

It is no secret that people today ingest far too much sugar. According to the NHS, adults should not be consuming more than 30g of added sugars per day.

But we consume 3x that amount !

It’s no wonder why were becoming fat

and unhealthy

In 1700, the average person consumed approximately 4.9 grams of sugar each day (1.81 kg per year). That’s about 1 teaspoon.

·         In 1800, the average person consumed approximately 22.4 grams of sugar each day (10.2 kg per year). That’s about 5 teaspoons

·         In 1900, the average person consumed approximately 112 grams of sugar each day (40.8 kg per year). That’s 28 teaspoons

·         In 2009, 50 per cent of Americans consumed approximately 227 grams of sugar each day – equating to 81.6 kg per year. That’s almost 58 teaspoons !!!

We wonder why we’re sick! And living with chronic pain.

I mean it’s in everything. From Cookies where we expect it to me to tomato sauce and yogurt. Things you never would expect to have sugar and it’s causing us to be fat and unhealthy and full of inflammation.

I’m trying to cut out added sugar and it was very hard.

Once you get past a few weeks you will feel better.

Food tastes better also and coffee does to .

I do use hazelnut coffee mate . And I’m not going to lie I still will eat a couple chips ahoy thin cookies or a mini cupcake or two now and then.

But I am really trying to get off the sugar. I have to admit it’s harder than when I stopped smoking.

I have learned through my herbology classes how to make my own liquid stevia.

And it’s helped me cut back a lot on the sugar. I just can’t drink things like tea without some sweetness in it.

So now actually make my own Stevia extract and dilute it, and other Stevia liquid flavor it etc..

I learned a lot in the herbology classes I take.

I buy all my herbs from mountains rose herbs.

I also just put the dry leaves in a beverage hot or cold.

I stopped buying Stevia at the store.

Also raw honey is good to use as a substitute.

Anything processed with a strange chemical or an artificial ingredients added is never good.

You can use fresh stevia leaves as a sweetener in beverages, such as tea and lemonade, or in sauces. A few fresh stevia and mint leaves make a great herbal tea when steeped in a cup of boiling water.

Add fresh stevia leaves to beverages or foods as a sweet, edible garnish. Although the fresh leaves are less sweet than dried leaves, they’re still much sweeter than sugar. Taste-test your beverage before serving to ensure you don’t over-sweeten your drink.

Use dry stevia leaves to make a powdered sweetener. Bundle and hang fresh stevia plant stems upside down in a warm, dry location until the leaves are thoroughly dry, then strip the leaves from the stems.

Fill a blender, food processor or coffee grinder to half full with dry leaves and process at high speed for a few seconds.

Store the powdered sweetener in an airtight container. Use the powder in recipes that call for a sweetener, but make adjustments in the amount used due to its dense sweetness.

A general rule of thumb is that 2 to 3 tablespoons of stevia powder equals 1 cup of sugar.

Use dry stevia leaves to make a syrup for sweetening beverages, sauces or other syrups. Add one cup of warm water to one-quarter cup of fresh, finely crushed stevia leaves.

Put the mixture in an airtight container and allow it to set for 24 hours before straining the leaves from the mixture. You can cook the strained mixture on low heat, reducing it to a more concentrated syrup. The syrup should last for several years, if kept in an airtight container in your refrigerator.

Things You Will Need

* Blender

* Measuring cups

* Strainer

* Airtight container

• Glass amber color and dropper

I also make my own liquid stevia extract for baking etc…

Stevia extract recipe.

Vodka

Organic Stevia Leafs Dried

Glass mason jar

Fill a clean glass jar 1/4 to 1/3 full with stevia leaf. Cover the herb with vodka and pour to the very top. Allow to steep for 24-48 hours, taking care not to let it extract any longer than that to avoid bitterness. Strain and bottle it in a dark amber glass dropper bottle.

Vanilla Stevia Extract Recipe

Chop 1 vanilla bean and add to strained stevia extract. Allow to infuse for 2 to 6 weeks. Strain and bottle it in an amber bottle with dropper.

Lemon Stevia Extract

Fill your jar 1/3 full with organic lemon peel

Cover completely with strained stevia extract.

Allow to infuse for 1 to 4 weeks, tasting along the way. Strain and bottle in amber glass bottle with dropper

HOW TO USE HOMEMADE STEVIA EXTRACT

Add 1-2 drops to your favorite beverages (I especially love using homemade stevia extract to sweeten my coffee or tea!) A little bit goes a long way, so start with small amounts.

I found I had  to use a bit more of my homemade stevia to get the desired level of sweetness, as compared to the store-bought stevia I’ve tried.

But I think the sweetness will depends on how long you heated the extract and how many leaves you used.

This is a Stevia Plant.

Your dry stevia leaves can be used to make a healthy syrup for sweetening beverages, sauces, or even other syrups. A teaspoon of stevia syrup is as sweet as a cup of sugar.

Take 2 cups of warm water and add it to half a cup of dried stevia leaves.  Put the mixture in a glass jar and let it steep for 24 hours. Strain the leaves from the mixture.

Cook the strained mixture on low heat, reducing it to a concentrated syrup. The syrup should last for at least a year if kept in an airtight container in your refrigerator.

Conversion chart

1 cup of sugar is equal to – 1 teaspoon of stevia leaf powder or 1 teaspoon of stevia extract.

1 tablespoon of sugar is equal to – .25 teaspoon of stevia powder or 6-9 drops of stevia extract.

1 teaspoon of sugar is equal to – a pinch of stevia powder or 2-4 drops of stevia extract.

Stevia is becoming a popular plant and is readily available at most local nurseries.

If grown inside or outside it will flourish.

Thankfully it has few pests and is easy to grow and preserve.

Now that you know how to use it, you be adding stevia to your garden or window seal.

Another Recipe

Extract

With Alcohol cooked off.

• 1 glass jar with a tight fitting lid

• Dried Stevia leaves. They can be crumbled, chopped or powdered

• Vodka or Rum

Using a ratio of 2 parts stevia to 3 parts liquid, place one cup of stevia in the jar and cover it with 1.5 cups of alcohol.

Shake the mixture well and let it sit for no more than 36 hours. (it will become bitter if you steep it longer than 36 hours) Strain through muslin or a coffee filter and pour the tincture into a dark colored bottle.

To remove the alcohol: once the 36 hours are up, simmer the mixture on low heat for 30 minutes, stirring regularly.

Be careful not to boil.  When it cools, strain and bottle as above.

This mixture should be kept in the refrigerator, where it will store for six months.

.

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Posted in Bone Health, Delicious, Eat Healthy, Family Tradition, Gluten Free, Hacks, Uncategorized, Vegetables

Eggplant Pomodoro Pasta.

If you are an eggplant lover, this dish is for you! If you are on the fence about eggplant this will make you a lover for sure.

Eggplant and tomato sauce flavored with capers and green olives and mixed with quinoa spaghetti, fresh parsley, and Parmesan cheese.

This Eggplant Pomodoro Pasta is a 30-minute vegetarian and gluten-free dish that you can make on any night.

But this is what’s for dinner tonight.

The summer is officially over. Our AC is turned off, most days , windows are open,I am loving the fresh breeze.

I hate to see Summer end. But I love fall veggies

Personally, if I had my way I would spend all day outside.

I keep finding excuses to go outside even though I should be home cleaning etc…. I am sure you know the feeling.

Having a bone disease I know I will be stuck indoors more than I would like because my bones can’t deal with the cold.

So any day above 65 is a blessing for me.

Today’s recipe, Eggplant Pomodoro Pasta, is a summer dish but I will.

Soon I will be having Squash and quinoa pasta but not today.

If you have ever cooked eggplants before, you would know, sometimes, especially if it is an older eggplant, its brown seeds might cause it taste bitter. To get rid of the bitterness, my mother used to put sliced eggplants in a bowl of water with a generous amount of salt. Letting it sit in salty water for 10-15 minutes would improve the taste of the flesh and get rid of the bitterness. Alternatively, you can also sprinkle your eggplant with salt and let is sit on the counter for 20-30 minutes. In both methods, it is imperative to pat dry them with paper towels and make sure they are as dry as possible.

I love quinoa spaghetti as I think it is healthier than regular spaghetti.

Plus it is gluten-free, but you can always use regular semolina flour pasta.

INGREDIENTS

1 pound quinoa or brown rice pasta,

2 medium eggplant or 5 small (1 pound), cut into 1-inch small cubes no need to peel but I stipe peel mine.

1 tbspn salt is what is usually used

I use less say a large teaspoon total and then I season into cooking a bit more.

2 tablespoons olive oil

4 cloves of garlic

1 tablespoon tomato paste

8 medium sized Roma tomatoes, cut into small cubes

1 cup colorful cherry tomatoes, sliced

3-4 tablespoons capers, drained and rinsed

½ cup green olives, pitted and sliced

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

salt and pepper *

4 scallions, chopped both green and white parts

½ cup Italian Parsley, rinsed and chopped thinly

1/3 cup Parmesan cheese, grated

½ cup lightly roasted pine nuts (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Cook the pasta according to the package instructions. Reserve one cup of the pasta liquid. Set aside.

2. As the pasta is cooking, make the eggplant pomodoro sauce: Fill a bowl with 4 cups of cold tab water. Add a tablespoon of salt. Place the eggplant cubes into the salty water. Let it sit for 10 minutes in water. Rinse and place on a sheet of paper towels to dry.

3. Heat olive oil in a 12-inch cast-iron skillet (or any heavy bottom pan) and add in the eggplant. Cook, stirring frequently, for 5-6 minutes. Add in the garlic and cook for 30 seconds.

4. Stir in the tomato paste and cook, stirring constantly, for 1 minute.

5. Add in the Roma tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, capers, and green olives. Season with ½ teaspoon salt and ½ teaspoon black pepper. Pour the balsamic vinegar into the sauce. Give everything a gentle stir and let it cook for 10-15 minutes in medium heat. Taste for seasoning and add if necessary.

6. Place the cooked pasta into the sauce (alternatively you can place everything in a large bowl). Sprinkle it with scallions, parsley, Parmesan cheese, and pine nuts (if using). If the pasta feels dry, use some of the reserved pasta liquid. Give it a toss to distribute the sauce evenly.

7. Serve with more Parmesan cheese parsley on the side.

Posted in Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Diagnosed, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, exercise, Factor V Leiden, Food, Hacks, Happiness, Herbal, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, Music, OA, Osteonecrosis, Positivity, Uncategorized, Vision

Various Relaxation Techniques

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With so much stress that comes with having a chronic condition and the world we live in is full of several fast paced situations , hurry here, hurry there , doctor appointments, tests,people with little to no patience and they want us to move a bit faster!
Excuse You! But I have a bone disease and I am going as fast as I can.
People judging us
It can be overwhelming
It's no wonder at the end of a day we can't sleep.

I think personally everyone needs to learn how to just open our mind relax and chill a little.

Relaxation Techniques
Using the Relaxation Response to Relieve Stress

For many of us, relaxation means zoning out in front of the TV at the end of a stressful day.

But this does little to reduce the damaging effects of stress.

To effectively combat stress, we need to activate the body's natural relaxation response.
You can do this by practicing relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation, rhythmic exercise, and yoga or chair yoga if you are challenged with Bone and joint issues.

Fitting these activities into your life can help reduce everyday stress, boost your energy and mood, and improve your mental and physical health..

What is the relaxation response? Well based on what I have read …
When stress overwhelms your nervous system, your body is flooded with chemicals that prepare you for "fight or flight."
This stress response can be lifesaving in emergency situations where you need to act quickly.
But when it’s constantly activated by the stresses of everyday life, it can wear your body down and take a toll on your emotional health.

No one can avoid all stress, but you can counteract its detrimental effects by learning how to produce the relaxation response, a state of deep rest that is the polar opposite of the stress response. The relaxation response puts the brakes on stress and brings your body and mind back into a state of equilibrium.
When the relaxation response is activated, your:
heart rate slows down
breathing becomes slower and deeper
blood pressure drops or stabilizes
muscles relax
blood flow to the brain increases

In addition to its calming physical effects, the relaxation response also increases energy and focus, combats illness, relieves aches and pains, heightens problem-solving abilities, and boosts motivation and productivity. Best of all, anyone can reap these benefits with regular practice.
How to produce the relaxation response
Simply laying on the couch, reading, or watching TV while sometimes relaxing isn’t going to produce the physical and psychological benefits of the relaxation response. For that, you’ll need to actively practice a relaxation technique.
Finding the relaxation technique that’s best for you may be interesting because there is no single relaxation technique that is best for everyone.
So I am going to touch base on a few and post their YouTube links below.

The right relaxation technique is the one that resonates with you, fits your lifestyle, and is able to focus your mind and interrupt your everyday thoughts to elicit the relaxation response. You may even find that alternating or combining different techniques provide the best results.

How you react to stress may also influence the relaxation technique that works best for you:

The “fight” response. If you tend to become angry, agitated, or keyed up under stress, you will respond best to stress relief activities that quiet you down, such as meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, deep breathing, or guided imagery.
The “flight” response. If you tend to become depressed, withdrawn, or spaced out under stress, you will respond best to stress relief activities that are stimulating and energize your nervous system, such as rhythmic exercise, massage, mindfulness, or power yoga.

The immobilization response. If you’ve experienced some type of trauma and tend to “freeze” or become “stuck” under stress, your challenge is to first rouse your nervous system to a fight or flight response (above) so you can employ the applicable stress relief techniques.
To do this, choose physical activity that engages both your arms and legs, such as running, dancing, or tai chi, and perform it mindfully, focusing on the sensations in your limbs as you move.

Deep breathing
With its focus on full, cleansing breaths, deep breathing is a simple yet powerful relaxation technique. It’s easy to learn, can be practiced almost anywhere, and provides a quick way to get your stress levels in check. Deep breathing is the cornerstone of many other relaxation practices, too, and can be combined with other relaxing elements such as aromatherapy and music. All you really need is a few minutes and a place to stretch out.
How to practice deep breathing
The key to deep breathing is to breathe deeply from the abdomen, getting as much fresh air as possible in your lungs. When you take deep breaths from the abdomen, rather than shallow breaths from your upper chest, you inhale more oxygen. The more oxygen you get, the less tense, short of breath, and anxious you feel.
Sit comfortably with your back straight. Put one hand on your chest and the other on your stomach.
Breathe in through your nose. The hand on your stomach should rise. The hand on your chest should move very little.
Exhale through your mouth, pushing out as much air as you can while contracting your abdominal muscles. The hand on your stomach should move in as you exhale, but your other hand should move very little.
Continue to breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth. Try to inhale enough so that your lower abdomen rises and falls. Count slowly as you exhale.

If you find it difficult breathing from your abdomen while sitting up, try lying down. Put a small book on your stomach, and breathe so that the book rises as you inhale and falls as you exhale.

Progressive muscle relaxation
Progressive muscle relaxation is a two-step process in which you systematically tense and relax different muscle groups in the body. With regular practice, it gives you an intimate familiarity with what tension as well as complete relaxation feels like in different parts of the body. This can help you to you react to the first signs of the muscular tension that accompanies stress. And as your body relaxes, so will your mind.

Progressive muscle relaxation can be combined with deep breathing for additional stress relief.
Practicing progressive muscle relaxation
Consult with your doctor first if you have a history of muscle spasms, back problems, or other serious injuries that may be aggravated by tensing muscles.
Start at your feet and work your way up to your face, trying to only tense those muscles intended.
1. Loosen clothing, take off your shoes, and get comfortable.
2. Take a few minutes to breathe in and out in slow, deep breaths.
3. When you’re ready, shift your attention to your right foot. Take a moment to focus on the way it feels.
4. Slowly tense the muscles in your right foot, squeezing as tightly as you can. Hold for a count of 10.
5. Relax your foot. Focus on the tension flowing away and how your foot feels as it becomes limp and loose.
6. Stay in this relaxed state for a moment, breathing deeply and slowly.
7. Shift your attention to your left foot. Follow the same sequence of muscle tension and release.
8. Move slowly up through your body, contracting and relaxing the different muscle groups.
9. It may take some practice at first, but try not to tense muscles other than those intended.

Mindfulness meditation
Rather than worrying about the future or dwelling on the past, mindfulness meditation switches the focus to what’s happening right now, enabling you to be fully engaged in the present moment.

Meditations that cultivate mindfulness have long been used to reduce stress, anxiety, depression, and other negative emotions. Some of these meditations bring you into the present by focusing your attention on a single repetitive action, such as your breathing, a few repeated words, or the flickering light of a candle. Other forms of mindfulness meditation encourage you to follow and then release internal thoughts or sensations. Mindfulness can also be applied to activities such as walking, exercising, or eating.
A basic mindfulness exercise:
1. Sit on a straight-backed chair or cross-legged on the floor.
2. Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling.
3. Once you've narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations, and thoughts.
4. Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.

Body scan meditation
This is a type of meditation that that focuses your attention on various parts of your body. Like progressive muscle relaxation, you start with your feet and work your way up. But instead of tensing and relaxing muscles, you simply focus on the way each part of your body feels, without labeling the sensations as either “good” or “bad”.
Practicing body scan meditation
Lie on your back, legs uncrossed, arms relaxed at your sides, eyes open or closed. Focus on your breathing for about two minutes until you start to feel relaxed.
Turn your focus to the toes of your right foot. Notice any sensations you feel while continuing to also focus on your breathing. Imagine each deep breath flowing to your toes. Remain focused on this area for one to two minutes.
Move your focus to the sole of your right foot. Tune in to any sensations you feel in that part of your body and imagine each breath flowing from the sole of your foot. After one or two minutes, move your focus to your right ankle and repeat. Move to your calf, knee, thigh, hip, and then repeat the sequence for your left leg. From there, move up the torso, through the lower back and abdomen, the upper back and chest, and the shoulders. Pay close attention to any area of the body that causes you pain or discomfort.
After completing the body scan, relax for a while in silence and stillness, noting how your body feels. Then slowly open your eyes and stretch, if necessary.
Rhythmic movement and mindful exercise
The idea of exercising may not sound particularly soothing, but rhythmic exercise that gets you into a flow of repetitive movement can be very relaxing. Examples include:
Running
Walking
Swimming
Dancing
Rowing
Climbing
For maximum stress relief, add mindfulness to your workout
While simply engaging in rhythmic exercise will help you relieve stress, if you add a mindfulness component on top, you’ll get even more benefit.
As with meditation, mindful exercise requires being fully engaged in the present moment—paying attention to how your body feels right now, rather than your daily worries or concerns. In order to “turn off” your thoughts, focus on the sensations in your limbs and how your breathing complements your movement.
If you’re walking or running, for example, focus on the sensation of your feet touching the ground, the rhythm of your breath, and the feeling of the wind against your face. If your mind wanders to other thoughts, gently return to focusing on your breathing and movement.
Visualization
Visualization, or guided imagery, is a variation on traditional meditation that involves imagining a scene in which you feel at peace, free to let go of all tension and anxiety. Choose whatever setting is most calming to you, whether it’s a tropical beach, a favorite childhood spot, or a quiet wooded glen.
You can practice visualization on your own or with a therapist (or an audio recording of a therapist) guiding you through the imagery. You can also choose to do your visualization in silence or use listening aids, such as soothing music or a sound machine or recording that matches your chosen setting—the sound of ocean waves if you’ve chosen a beach, for example.
Practicing visualization
Close your eyes and imagine your restful place. Picture it as vividly as you can—everything you can see, hear, smell, taste, and feel. Just “looking” at it like you would a photograph is not enough. Visualization works best if you incorporate as many sensory details as possible.
For example, if you are thinking about a dock on a quiet lake:
See the sun setting over the water
Hear the birds singing
Smell the pine trees
Feel the cool water on your bare feet
Taste the fresh, clean air
Enjoy the feeling of your worries drifting away as you slowly explore your restful place. When you are ready, gently open your eyes and come back to the present.
Don't worry if you sometimes zone out or lose track of where you are during a visualization session. This is normal. You may also experience feelings of heaviness in your limbs, muscle twitches, or yawning. Again, these are normal responses.
Yoga and tai chi
Yoga involves a series of both moving and stationary poses, combined with deep breathing. As well as reducing anxiety and stress, yoga can also improve flexibility, strength, balance, and stamina. Since injuries can happen when yoga is practiced incorrectly, it’s best to learn by attending group classes, hiring a private teacher, or at least following video instructions. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others, tailoring your practice as you see fit.

If you’re unsure whether a specific yoga class is appropriate for stress relief, call the studio or ask the teacher.
Tai chi
If you’ve seen a group of people in the park slowly moving in synch, you’ve probably witnessed tai chi. Tai chi is a self-paced, non-competitive series of slow, flowing body movements. By focusing your mind on the movements and your breathing, you keep your attention on the present, which clears the mind and leads to a relaxed state.
Tai chi is a safe, low-impact option for people of all ages and fitness levels, including older adults and those recovering from injuries. As with yoga, it's best learned in a class or from a private instructor. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others.
Self-massage
You’re probably already aware how much a professional massage at a spa or health club can help reduce stress, relieve pain, and ease muscle tension. What you may not be aware of is that you can experience many of the same benefits at home or work by practicing self-massage—or trading massages with a loved one.
Try taking a few minutes to massage yourself at your desk between tasks, on the couch at the end of a hectic day, or in bed to help you unwind before sleep. To enhance relaxation, you can use aromatic oil, scented lotion, or combine self-message with mindfulness or deep breathing techniques.

Starting a regular relaxation practice
Learning the basics of these relaxation techniques isn’t difficult, but it takes regular practice to truly harness their stress-relieving power. Most stress experts recommend setting aside at least 10 to 20 minutes a day for your relaxation practice. If you’d like to maximize the benefits, aim for 30 minutes to an hour.
Tips for making relaxation techniques part of your life
Set aside time in your daily schedule. If possible, schedule a set time once or twice a day for your practice. If your schedule is already packed, remember that many relaxation techniques can be practiced while you’re doing other things. Try meditating while commuting on the bus or train, taking a yoga or tai chi break at lunchtime, or practicing mindful walking while exercising your dog.
Don't practice when you're sleepy. These techniques are so relaxing that they can make you very sleepy. However, you will get the most benefit if you practice when you’re fully alert. Avoid practicing close to bedtime or after a heavy meal or alcohol.
Expect ups and downs. Don’t be discouraged if you skip a few days or even a few weeks. Just get started again and slowly build up to your old momentum.
If you exercise, improve the relaxation benefits by adopting mindfulness. Instead of zoning out or staring at a TV as you exercise, try focusing your attention on your body. If you’re resistance training, for example, focus on coordinating your breathing with your movements and pay attention to how your body feels as you raise and lower weights.

Here is a few links I use to
relax
reduce pain
help me sleep better

These are my favorites and I listen to it daily and a few I listen to now and then

Daily
Mindfulness
https://youtu.be/-2zdUXve6fQ

Stress Relief and Confidence
https://youtu.be/-KMngzCWgTw

Morning Meditation for Healing
https://youtu.be/q9ZR_CJhuLc

Reiki for pain relief
https://youtu.be/3nJtajgAb34

Relax Video Male Voice
https://youtu.be/_jD3VxSGM-k

https://youtu.be/oA_rY4N8XJA

Sounds for Anxiety depression
https://youtu.be/AmqDOA-JALg

Meditation Sounds for pain relief
https://youtu.be/XiNne25uMK8

To help you sleep
https://youtu.be/xQ6xgDI7Whc

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The information provided on this website is for educational purposes only. By using the website you are participating at your own risk.
• Make sure you practise with enough free space around you. Wear comfortable clothing so you can move freely.
• Please take responsibility for your own body and include extra warm up and cool down stretches where appropriate.
• You should avoid alcohol and drugs before yoga and meditation. Also no heavy meals for two hours before practice. Keep yourself hydrated before and after your yoga practice.
• If you feel dizzy, light-headed, faint, or if you experience any other discomfort, stop exercising immediately and consult a medical doctor. You are responsible for your condition during your practice. Exercise within your limits. Never force or strain. Seek attention and advice as appropriate.
• We offer no medical advice. You should consult a medical practitioner before starting any new exercise regime. This is particularly important if you are overweight, pregnant, nursing, regularly taking medications, or have any existing medical conditions. This website may not be tailored to your current physical and mental health. We accept no liability whatsoever for any damages arising from the use of this website.
• We do not recommend that you attempt any of this or yoga exercises for the first time without suitable experience or supervision.
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Posted in Blessed, Eat Healthy, Family Tradition, Food, Hacks, Life, Recipes, Uncategorized, WegoHealth

EGG-celent Hacks

I love Easter but I miss my daughter and granddaughter being little. Seems like it’s just more fun.

Here are some fun ideas we used to do. 
Paper Towel Patterned Eggs:

Dye your hard-boiled eggs with a light base coat in the color of your choice. Wet a patterned or quilted paper towel with white vinegar. Wrap the wet paper towel around a hard-boiled egg and twist to enclose the egg snugly in the paper towel. Dab dots of different shades of food coloring in various spots on the paper towel. You can let it sit for 1 to 2 minutes, although it’s not necessary. Then, remove the paper towel to reveal the pattern! Repeat with the rest of the eggs.

Robins’ Eggs:

Place white, uncooked rice in a plastic container with a lid. Add about 6 drops of your desired shade of food coloring and shake up the rice until it’s uniformly colored. Add a hard-boiled egg and put the top on the container. Gently shake the egg around until a speckled pattern emerges. Repeat with additional eggs. You can do 1 color, or mix it up with different colors in different containers. Just toss the eggs consecutively in each container.

Crackle Eggs:

Hard-boil your eggs, then let them cool. Crack the eggs all over using a tabletop or the back of a spoon; don’t break the shells off, just crack the outer layer enough to create a crackle pattern. Place each egg inside a ziptop bag (1 egg per bag), then place a few drops of food coloring and 1 to 2 tablespoons of water in each bag. Twist the bags around the eggs and secure with a rubber band. Let sit for about 30 minutes, then take the eggs out of the bags and carefully peel the shells from them, revealing the crackle patterns.

Silk Tie-Dye Eggs: 

NOT FOR EAT DECORATION ONLY

Use an old tie that is 100 percent silk or buy one at a thrift store. Cut off pieces of the tie large enough to wrap completely around an egg. Then, cut similar-sized pieces of fabric from an old sheet or pillow case. Wrap each uncooked egg in a piece of the tie fabric with the pattern facing the egg and secure with rubber bands, then wrap in a piece of the fabric and secure again. Place the wrapped eggs in a glass or enamel pot filled with enough water to cover the eggs and add 3 tablespoons of white vinegar. Bring the water to a boil, then reduce the heat and let simmer for 20 minutes. Remove the eggs from the water, let cool for 30 minutes and then unwrap to see the tie’s designs transferred onto the eggs!
Use these tie-dye eggs for decoration only; they are not intended for consumption.