Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Chronic Pain, Clinical Trials, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Hashimoto, Hypothyroidism, Life, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, SPONK, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Support Group, Hope, The Mighty, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards, wellness

WEGOHealth Awards and How to Nominate Others

I’m honored to say I’ve been nominated for the #WEGOHealthAwards! These awards seek to recognize Patient Leaders who are making an impact with their advocacy. Learn more – nominate today.

Here’s how you can also nominate others who educate, advocate and make a difference!

Click link below

WEGOHealth Awards and Nomination Info

WEGOHealth Awards Link To Information

Think about the advocates and influencers you see leading Facebook groups, blogging about their health journey, speaking up and giving insights to healthcare companies, presenting on national stages, and running Twitter chats.

Patient Leaders have started non-profits, published podcast episodes, and authored books – there is no shortage of Patient Leaders’ contributions to the world, so let’s recognize as many of them as we can for their talents, contributions, and commitment.

Feel free to add their names and web info also in my comment section! And they can get some recognition here to !

Have a Great Day Everyone

Posted in Adrenals, Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Awareness, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Delicious, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Hashimoto, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, SONK, SPONK, Uncategorized, Vegetables, WegoHealth, wellness

Healthy Eating

Developing healthy eating habits isn’t as confusing or as restrictive as many people imagine. The essential steps are to eat mostly foods derived from plants—vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes (beans, peas, lentils)—and limit highly processed foods.

 

For most of my life, I ate the standard American diet and meals that were heavy in meat and processed foods. I went to a vegetarian lifestyle in high school for a couple years then back to the old way.

When i was diagnosed with Osteonecrosis, Osteoarthritis HBP etc and especially when my husband had a heart attack in 2016 I thought enough was enough.

I got rid of a lot of processed foods, potato chips, convenience meals, and loved Oreo’s and Nutter Butter cookies. There was a lot of sugar, oil, and junk in my diet.

We quit smoking 2 years ago almost. and we as a team decided to go part time but mostly vegan .

Me having a few issues from Osteonecrosis, Osteoarthritis, Hashimot’s and Hypothyroidism and Adrenal Fatigue left me in pain and always exhausted.

I had been dealing with pain in my knee and back for a few years. My mind wants to go go go like it did 25 years ago, my knees say oh hell no slow down woman. And this extra weight is just hard on the bones. But when your limited by many bone issues its really hard to just walk 3-4 miles a day. I bike 3-4 miles a day but its not the same as a good hike in the woods. I do go now and then walking in the woods but hiking I’m afraid for now all that has been on hold.

Going to mostly plant based has helped my pain. And my energy.

So its working and I am feeling better slowly …..

Its a process…

Don’t just go all I went to 65 percent of eating all veggies daily  then added more from there. Some days i eat no meat or fish and some days i will. I Slowly cut out animal products, starting with the easiest and leaving barrier foods to the end. Slowly lessened  my consumption of animal products while simultaneously increasing the number of plant-based foods in our diet.

I spoke to my doctors and I will post tomorrow just how i got started

 

 

plantsz

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Endocrinologist, Factor V Leiden, Hashimoto, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, Lemon, Sunshine

Sunshine Blogger Award

I am always humbled and honored when someone nominates me for a blogger award.

Out of so many bloggers, you thought of me.

Thank you, Christine , for nominating me for the Sunshine blogger award.

Thank you for sharing your information and knowledge to the world. I hope you enjoy your retirement

Here are the rules:

• Thank blogger(s) who nominated you for the blog post and link back to their blog if possible.

• Answer the 5 questions the blogger asked you.

• Nominate 5 new blogs to receive the award and write them 5 new questions.

• List the rules and display Sunshine Blogger Award logo in your post and/or blog

1. Is it sunny where you are today? Today no it’s raining in Ohio

2. Why did you start your blog? I started blogging to bring awareness to disorders like Osteonecrosis-Osteoarthritis-Hypothyroidism-Now Hashimoto and how eating healthy can combat pain and inflammation

3. How long have you been blogging?

About 2 years but I’m still learning as I go.

4. Give us some information on your platform. I wrote about my health challenges and how I am changing how I eat to feel better.

5. What food reminds you of sunshine? Anything made with lemons.

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Energy, exercise, Factor V Leiden, Food Is Thy Medicine, Heart Disease, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Positivity, SONK, StopTheClot, Thoughts, Uncategorized, Vision, Weather, WegoHealth, Winter, Women

1 year ago I decided to take my health back

Happy Anniversary To My Health….

I was always pretty healthy ….until I wasn’t.

I gained weight , injured my knee gained more weight was diagnosed with one thing after another and it was really exhausting.

First osteoarthritis and hypothyroidism at age 45

They torn meniscus age 51

Then thanks to the meniscus tear Osteonecrosis set in my knee….

Then she 53 diagnosed officially with spondylolisthesis and a bilateral pars fracture

I had the spondylolisthesis before but my former PCP never told me I had it. But I seen it on an old Mri.

The pain every where was exhausting and some days it still is.

But I decided the heck with all these doctors and I decided to eat mostly plant based but I do still eat chicken fish or turkey now and then and rarely beef.

I ride my recumbent bike 2x a day and I walk when I can. And some days even when I should rest I go walk anyway.

Today’s pictures and videos are from my morning walk : and it’s also one year ago I quit smoking……so it’s a great day !

Pain or no pain I’m not going to just sit around.

Sitting is death

Moving is life

And ya know after I’m done I feel so much better.

1 year since I’ve quit smoking after being a smoker for 40 years. My lungs are feel better my walking speed has improved my distance has improved

1 year since I started eating a healthy mostly plant based but I’m not a vegan and it’s good clean healthy real colorful food . I am using food as medicine in a way to fight pain and inflammation . Now sure I eat a cookie or 2 now and then just not every day. And all my other choices are good so I don’t deprive myself of a treat now and then.

And for having Osteonecrosis,Osteoarthritis, Spondylolisthesis with a bilateral pats fracture in my L5 S1 I feel pretty darn good today even in this cold weather.

Just need to drop some weight one step and one day at a time.

I have taken my life back and no one is going to stop me !

Tomorrow I may be in pain and that’s ok. I can accept that but as long as I know I am doing all I can to combat my pain and keep my body moving and providing it with the best nutrients possible(most of the time)

It’s a win win for me ,one day at a time !

Keep your meds , keep your cigarettes keep your junk fast food.

Body Heal Thy Self

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Food, Food Is Thy Medicine, Foodie, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, SPONK, StopTheClot, Thyroid

Pain Chronic Pain

Once we accept the reality of the current moment (no matter how unpleasant it may be) for what it is, and not what we wish it were, we can turn our attention to ways to improve it. This I find true in any situation.

Living with chronic pain can throw your life upside down.

It’s hard to believe that I can and have managed my rare disease Osteonecrosis (knee) pain. And my Osteoarthritis pain.

But the pain of spondylolisthesis somedays is truly unbearable. It can just take a fabulous day day and screw it all up.

Today is one of those days.

I try to stay busy , and positive when I really would like to go somewhere and just scream at the top of my lungs.

I don’t think my neighbors would appreciate it. So I bang away at the keyboard.

Since the weather in NE Ohio has changed I am having more and more days in pain.

And in the days when all the above hurt I’m down right miserable. Thank Hod that hasn’t happened yet , but then fall and winter have only begun….

I’m grateful today it’s just my back although it feels as if I have been kicked in my L5S1 several times.

Besides having spondylolisthesis I also for the past decade or longer been dealing with osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis since 2014.

If you don’t know what they are I will explain below.

Osteoarthritis

Sometimes called degenerative joint disease or degenerative arthritis, osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common chronic condition of the joints, affecting approximately 27 million Americans. OA can affect any joint, but it occurs most often in knees, hips, lower back and neck, small joints of the fingers and the bases of the thumb and big toe.

In normal joints, a firm, rubbery material called cartilage covers the end of each bone. Cartilage provides a smooth, gliding surface for joint motion and acts as a cushion between the bones. In OA, the cartilage breaks down, causing pain, swelling and problems moving the joint. As OA worsens over time, bones may break down and develop growths called spurs. Bits of bone or cartilage may chip off and float around in the joint. In the body, an inflammatory process occurs and cytokines (proteins) and enzymes develop that further damage the cartilage. In the final stages of OA, the cartilage wears away and bone rubs against bone leading to joint damage and more pain.

Who’s Affected?

Although OA occurs in people of all ages, osteoarthritis is most common in people older than 65. Common risk factors include increasing age, obesity, previous joint injury, overuse of the joint, weak thigh muscles, and genes.

One in two adults will develop symptoms of knee OA during their lives.

One in four adults will development symptoms of hip OA by age 85. Lucky me I developed Osteoarthritis at age 45.

One in 12 people 60 years or older have hand OA.

Osteonecrosis What it is….

Osteonecrosis of the Knee. Osteonecrosis of the knee (also known as avascular necrosis) and if in the knee from a meniscus tear also called Ahlbacks Disease is a painful condition that occurs when the blood supply to a section of bone in the femur (thighbone) or tibia (shinbone) is disrupted.

I have Osteonecrosis of the medial femoral condyle due to a meniscus tear in 2014. Strange no one wanted to fix it or have any treatment plan.

This pain is like no other. Your area of Osteonecrosis is ice cold yet it often can feel like it was hit by a lightening bolt.

Weather plays a huge factor for me and my pain. I used to love winter now I can barely tolerate a cool fall day. I dread winter.

I get sick of being in pain. If it’s not the knees it’s back or hands it’s just enough to jack up my day or make things more difficult than they already are.

I have found that plant based lifestyle has helped my osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis a lot. I can’t understand why I haven’t lost a ton of weight though. I mean I don’t eat half the unhealthy calories I used to . But hey the doctors says it’s a slow thyroid.

I just wish these 40 lbs would come off it would also help my bones.

But maybe that will just take time.

If you haven’t tried a plant based lifestyle I would highly recommend it.

My cholesterol numbers are fantastic and all my doctors are impressed especially since I rarely need pain medication vs taking 2 a day like I did 3 years ago.

I truly believe that food can be your medicine or your poison.

The choice is yours.

I will be posting a lot of info and recipes

I don’t always eat perfect but life is about compromise and I follow a 90 / 10 rule.

It’s ok to have a cookie or small cupcake just make sure you eat as best as you can most of the time .

Living food is the way to go.

It may not take away all your pain but wouldn’t it be a benefit if it took away a lot of it ? And made it more managed?

Absolutely!!!

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Delicious, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Flush not Blush, Foodie, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, Life, OA, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, Positivity, Uncategorized

Basics To Use Food As Thy Medicine

The few basics you need to know to help pain management due to chronic inflammation with food .

1. Eat the rainbow: Consume 10-12 servings of vegetables each day , and make a couple of those servings fruit, if you like.

2. Cruciferous veggies such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower are best.

3. Restrict dairy and grains: Eat dairy products in limited quantities. When choosing grains, stay away from simple carbohydrates with refined sugar.

4. Opt for whole grains, including barley, buckwheat, oats, quinoa, brown rice, rye, spelt and wheat.

5. Avoid red meat: Eat red meat the way most of us eat turkey right now a few times a year. Have it on very special occasions, very infrequently. Instead, include fish as the “meat” or eat vegetarian main dishes. Chicken is neutral not harmful but not beneficial in the anti-inflammatory sense.

Get down to your ideal weight; weight loss on its own is anti-inflammatory.

Get daily exercise in the form of walking.

Manage your stress.

It is the overall diet and lifestyle and not just the individual foods, that control inflammation.

“For a chronic pain patient like me who was suffering, I went slightly extreme form of the diet so that was no red meat, no flour or sugar or simple carbohydrate and no dairy.

I did that for a month.

I do eat chicken or tuna once a week now. Beef maybe every other month.

I listen to what my body is saying now.

Before I just planned dinner and we ate whatever. It was delicious then but it was all the wrong foods or to much of them and not enough good clean healthy living food.

Now we eat for life.

#EatForLife

More ways to help chronic inflammation is to exercise. I know it’s hard when your in pain. But our body’s were meant to move. We have to move.

Exercise is an added benefit, particularly if people are overweight. “If there is any extra weight, you will need to try to lose it, I’m in that boat also. I need to drop a good 40lbs . But when I was first diagnosed with all these bones issues I was in so much pain I couldn’t move. I could barely think and function.

Ultimately, what we all need to know is that inflammation comes from a biochemical reaction initiated by your immune system or wound-healing coagulation system.

Specific foods can promote or shut down the inflammatory cycle.

For instance, simple carbohydrates like cakes,pies,sugar,chips,crisps,promote it, while good clean carbohydrates like fruits vegetables shut it down.

Don’t be afraid of carbohydrates just eat the good healthy ones 85 percent of the time then you can indulge now and then in a piece of pie.

Nutrition that supports a lifestyle rich in anti-inflammatory foods is the key to anti-inflammation and chronic pain management,

Although there are no magic foods, putting the right combination of foods into your diet can produce remarkable results.

I never knew until I took a class you should never really eat meat and potatoes together at a meal.

And it’s best to eat your fresh fruit by itself as a mid day snack.

Now let’s talk nightshades

I love many of them and eat them often and it doesn’t make my pain worse.

Nightshade vegetables are members of the Solanaceae family of flowering plants. Most nightshade plants aren’t edible such as tobacco and the deadly herb, belladonna.

A handful of nightshade vegetables, however, are edible and well-known staples in our diets, including:

tomatoes

eggplant

potatoes

peppers

All nightshade plants contain compounds called alkaloids. One alkaloid found in nightshade vegetables, solanine, may be toxic in large quantities or in a green potato. There’s no evidence solanine is harmful in typical food amounts. And solanine isn’t only found in nightshades—blueberries, huckleberries, and artichokes contain it, too.

Thanks to anecdotal evidence, nightshade vegetables have earned a bad reputation for causing inflammation in the body.

But not everyone with painful joints who eliminates nightshades from their diet experiences pain relief and some evidence suggests that the nutrition content of nightshades may help with arthritis symptoms.

What the research says about nightshade vegetables and arthritis

According to the Arthritis Foundation, the belief that eating nightshade vegetables worsens arthritis is a myth. They claim people with arthritis may benefit from the high nutrition content in nightshades.

For example, researchers in one 2011 study found that inflammation and DNA damage was reduced in healthy men who ate yellow or purple potatoes, which are nightshade vegetables, for six weeks.

Health benefits of popular nightshades

Most nightshade vegetables contain an abundance of nutrients. They’re also readily-available and easy-to-prepare. In some cases, the benefits of eating nightshade vegetables may outweigh any inflammation risk.

1. Peppers

Peppers, including bell peppers and chili peppers, are low in fat and calories.

They’re a good source of nutrients such as:

vitamin C

fiber

vitamin K

B vitamins

The capsaicin in chili peppers may relieve arthritis pain by reducing a specific pain transmitter in your nerves called Substance P. Capsaicin, which is a common ingredient in many pain-relieving creams. It may cause mild burning or a skin reaction when applied topically.

2. Potatoes

The white potato often gets a bad rap because it’s a starchy carb, but all varieties of potatoes are nutritionally-dense. They can be a part of a healthy diet when eaten in moderation and not fried or slathered in butter and sour cream.

Potatoes are fat-free and a good source of fiber. Fiber helps to keep you fuller longer so you may eat less. Since they contain sodium and potassium, potatoes also help keep your electrolytes in balance.

They’re also a good source of:

vitamin C

vitamin B6

niacin

manganese

iron

copper

folate

The healthiest potato is a baked potato. Add herbs and a dollop of Greek yogurt instead of butter and sour cream. Don’t be shy about trying different varieties, especially since pigmented potatoes may give you an anti-inflammatory bang for your buck.

3. Tomatoes

Technically, tomatoes aren’t a vegetable; they’re a fruit. They contain all four of the carotenoid antioxidants, which include:

lycopene

beta-carotene

alpha-carotene

lutein

Lycopene is the most powerful carotenoid. It’s thought to help prevent some types of cancer, help prevent heart disease, and boost immunity. Some research has shown tomatoes have anti-inflammatory abilities, although more research is needed. 

Tomatoes are a good source of:

vitamin E

vitamin A

potassium

calcium

vitamin K

vitamin B

Add fresh, diced tomatoes to a green salad or make fresh tomato juice. Tomatoes are delicious in vegetable soup and chili, too.

4. Eggplant

Like tomatoes, eggplant is also a fruit. It has no fat or cholesterol. Eggplant isn’t high in any one vitamin or mineral, but it contains small amounts of most essential vitamins and minerals.

According to one 2015 study, eggplant stalk extract may help reduce inflammation. More research is needed to determine if eggplant fruit has the same abilities.

To enjoy eggplant in your diet, go beyond a fat- and calorie-laden eggplant Parmesan casserole. Instead, try sprinkling sliced eggplant with olive oil and herbs, then roasting or grilling. You can also steam eggplant, or add sautéed slices to your favorite veggie pizza.

This is not medical advice this is based on how I eat to help my pain.

As well as just a few studies showing how good food is.

Posted in Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Eat Healthy, Endocrinologist, Hypothyroidism, Thyroid

Hypothyroidism The Rollercoaster.

Greetings

Those of us who have hypothyroidism know, this journey we call Thyroid Disease is an absolute roller coaster ride and you sometimes wonder when you will be able to get off this ride.

I’ve Seen 3 Specialists

Believe it or not, my original diagnosis of Hypothyroidism did not come from an endocrinologist, but from my primary care physician. He also was the one who had originally put me on Synthroid. It wasn’t until a few months later, when I wasn’t feeling any better, that my PCP finally recommended I see a specialist.

Well I saw an endocrinologist several years ago and was told TSH was fine. Boy I’d like to see him right now.

This Endocrinologist Spent Maybe 10 Minutes With Me

It actually took longer to fill out the new patient paperwork. He didn’t ask me any questions did not ask me a single question, and interrupted me down every time I went to ask a question .

After taking my blood, he told me I should lose weight I thought what the hell! I was 5’2 and then weighed maybe 128lbs with my clothes on.

That was it. I felt like paid someone to be rude to me for no reason. I could have stayed home and been verbally insulted by my first husband. He also called me a fat ass.

I told my PCP I wasn’t going back to that endocrinologist.

So I just kept taking the synthroid given by my PCP and I never felt right on it. I was told it takes time and adjustments.

Well fast forward now 10 years later . My new PCP Dr is a female as my old Dr just wasn’t cutting it any longer.

Seems like they get to many patients and just stop listening.

So my new PCP prescribes synthroid and I only take it every other day. What’s odd is I feel good when I’m not taking it.

But I try to comply

Still feeling like crap.

Now my insurance will only pay for levothyroxine, the generic version.

Wow I became mad all the time, anxious,very little sleep.

I asked my PCP for something else as I did research and wanted to try armor.

She doesn’t give armor.

So I see a new endocrinologist and I made sure I asked before never making the appointment do they prescribe armor? Yes they do.

So I take my blood work in meet a woman PA and then the Dr. I told them why I wanted armor and off all levothyroxine was told no problem.

I was given a rx for tirosint.

To my surprise it also is a levothyroxine drug.

And from 18.00 the co pay is 125.00

So I said the hell with that.

I stopped all thyroid medication and weekly called my endocrinologist to see when the armor was going to be called in as I am taking no thyroid meds at all.

This went on for 5 weeks. By now I’m exhausted, weak, feeling depressed, my face is puffy , I’m lethargic,and sleeping a lot plus my hair is dryer, skin dryer etc…

I finally demand to talk to the doctor and ask him if this is how all new patients are treated?

He apologized

Looked up the information

Apparently they called it in to a pharmacy I don’t go to and no one ever told me about it.

They barely made a note in my electronic chart.

Finally, Someone Who Listened To Me

And called it in to the right pharmacy and this is where this story will pick up.

I started the armor

September 13,2017 I am on 15 mcg and started out low. So as to now shock my body.

And I feel slightly better already. Not as anxious , I can sleep at night, my heart isn’t feeling like it’s going to jump out of my chest. I have more energy. The fog is lifting.

So I’m hoping this will be a good ride.

Time will tell.

But so far so good.

Know the symptoms

Common Symptoms of Hypothyroidism

Below are major symptoms associated with hypothyroidism.

• Fatigue

• Weakness

• Weight gain or difficulty losing weight (despite reduced food intake)

• Coarse, dry hair and dry skin

• Hair loss

• Sensitivity to cold

• Muscle cramps and aches

• Constipation

• Depression

• Irritability

• Memory loss

• Abnormal menstrual cycles

• Decreased libido

• Slowed speech (severe cases)

• Jaundice (severe cases)

• Increase in tongue size (severe cases)

You don’t have to encounter every one of these symptoms to be diagnosed with hypothyroidism. Every patient’s experience with the disorder is different. While you may notice that your skin and hair have become dry and rough, another patient may be plagued more by fatigue and depression.

The thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level reflects the severity of the hypothyroidism. For example, if you have a mild form of hypothyroidism and a relatively lower TSH level, you may not notice—or even have—symptoms. That’s because your hormone levels haven’t decreased to the point where they have a major impact on your metabolism. The more hypothyroid you become, the more symptomatic you’ll be.

The symptoms of hypothyroidism aren’t always noticeable, but it’s important that you understand what to look out for. Recognizing hypothyroidism early on will allow you to manage the disorder and prevent it from interfering with your life.

ChronicallyGratefulDebla