Posted in Chronic Pain, Inflammation, Pain

Cabbage -Don’t Overlook This Inflammation Fighting Veggie

1. Lowers the Signs of Aging

Cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables contain a high amount of Vitamin C and E, which help in the production of collagen, the compound which keeps the skin elastic and wrinkle-free. Vitamin A along with Vitamin D protects the skin and gives you a youthful skin.

  1. Helps Fight Free Radicals

Cabbage is rich in antioxidants Antioxidants help fight oxidative damage caused by free radicals and prevent a whole range of ailments.

  1. Speeds Up the Recovery Process

Cabbage leaves are used as a poultice. Using these leaves can ease skin eruptions caused by acne, psoriasis, eczema, ulcers, wounds,insect bites and rashes. Grated leaves or blended leaves can be applied directly over the affected area with some dressing for faster healing.

  1. Improves Complexion

Cabbage can also help acne and other skin conditions. Some steamed cabbage leaves compressed in a cotton cloth can be placed on the affected area overnight for best results. The levels of potassium and Vitamin A also improve complexion.

  1. May Provide Relief From Allergies

Cabbages and other cruciferous vegetables of its kind contain anti-inflammatory properties. They are rich in sulforaphane and glutamine which are powerful anti-inflammatory agents. Regular consumption can ease health conditions worsened by inflammation such as allergies, irritation, fever, joint pain and skin disorders.

  1. May Prevent Cancer

The Brassica vegetables such as cabbage contain a significant amount of glucosinolates that have strong anti-cancer properties. These compounds scavenge free radicals which are bad for health and contribute to cancers of different kinds. Red cabbages are particularly loaded with compounds such as sinigrin, lupeol and sulforaphane with anti-cancer properties.

  1. Good for the Digestive Tract

Cabbage is high in fiber, which makes it healthy for the digestive tract. Eating cabbage can provide relief from constipation. This is very effective in treating constipation and related gastrointestinal disorders.

  1. Promotes Weight Loss

As cabbage is loaded with essential nutrients and contains almost no calories or fats, hence it is perfect for people who are on a weight loss diet. If you don’t like to eat cabbage in the form of vegetable, you can drink cabbage juice.

  1. Protects the Eye

Vitamin A which is an essential nutrient for our eyes is present in cabbage and helps maintain good vision. The beta-carotene, an antioxidant present in cabbage is also helpful in preventing macular degeneration and delay the onset of cataracts.

  1. Improves the Health of Hair

Cabbage being rich in many of the essential nutrients helps maintain healthy hair and prevents hair fall. It also prevents dry hair and protects the hair strands from physical damage. Vitamin C which is found in cabbage is essential for the production of the protein keratin which primarily makes up the hair and nails in the body.

  1. Improves the Health of the Heart

Red cabbages are rich in compounds called anthocyanins which give them their characteristic purple color. Studieshave shown a link between diet consisting of foods rich in these compounds and lowering of heart disease. Along with this, cabbages are also good sources of potassium and calcium essential for healthy functioning of the heart.

  1. Good for the Brain

Cabbage is also brain food. Vitamin K and anthocyanins in cabbage promote mental function and focus. Vitamin K is also important to protect the nerve cells from damage and prevent degenerative diseases. Cabbage is also a rich source of iodine which is an essential nutrient for the brain.

  1. Helps Strengthen the Bones

Cabbages are abundant sources of nutrients that are necessary for building strong bones. They are loaded with calcium, magnesium, and potassium which are all essential for strengthening the bones. Eating cabbage may also help in warding off diseases such as osteoporosis.

  1. Regulates Blood Pressure

Red cabbage is an abundant source of anthocyanins which is known to lower blood pressure. Eating cabbage regularly helps maintain normal blood pressure and decreases the risk of heart diseases.

  1. Good for Diabetic Patients

The potassium present in cabbage is not only good for lowering blood pressure but helps maintain blood sugar levels. It also improves mental well being by reducing stress and anxiety.

16. Boosts Immunity

Being loaded with Vitamin C and antioxidants, cabbage helps boost immunity. It supports the immune system and fights off various diseases.

17. Helps Treat Peptic Ulcer

The presence of anti-inflammation compounds such as glucosinolates helps reduce peptic ulcers in the stomach. Cabbage juice is a remedy for ulcers. It eases the inflammation in the stomach lining and speeds up the recovery process.

 

Tips to Select and Store Cabbage

To get the most out of cabbage, you must first choose the best ones from the market. Here’s how to pick good cabbages:

  • Cabbages are available all year round in supermarkets. Look for ones that are large, dense, and firm. They should have colorful leaves that are crisp and shiny without bruises, blemishes, or insect bites. They must also feel heavy for their size.
  • Tightly packed leaves at the bottom of the cabbage indicate freshness. If they are starting to separate from its stem, the cabbage is old. Don’t buy it if it seems old.
  • Shredded cabbage or which is already cut in half should be avoided as they would have lost their Vitamin C content.
  • To retain their freshness and Vitamin C level, it’s essential to keep them cold in a refrigerator.
  • Cabbages that are stored in plastic bags in a refrigerator can be stored for a week or two.
  • Cabbages with loose leaves will not last too long and are best stored in a cool dark place.
  • In case you need half a cabbage, the other half should be wrapped in a plastic bag with some water sprinkled on the cut side and refrigerated.
  • Another way to store cabbage effectively is to freeze it. First, shred the cabbage and blanch the shreds for two minutes. Filter out and freeze the shreds in an airtight container.

How to Cook Cabbage

You can include cabbage in soups, salads, and casseroles. It can be boiled, fried, stuffed, steamed or even eaten raw. Here are some healthy ways to cook cabbages:

  • A simple cabbage dish can be made by boiling some water and adding chopped cabbage to it. Add sugar and sprinkle some meat seasoning and simmer for 35 minutes.
  • Grated cabbage can be cooked in milk for 3 to 4 minutes and seasoned with pepper and salt.
  • A low-calorie cabbage dish involves cooking cabbage leaves in a mixture of mustard and cucumber juice. Steamed cabbage and other vegetables can be diced and added to it. Cook until the cabbage is a little crispy.
  • Shred red cabbage into fine pieces and add sliced apples and a bit of vinegar. Cook for 1 minute.
  • To make stuffed cabbage rolls, remove the core and stuff it with vegetables of your choice. Cook for 3 minutes until it is soft and serve with a spicy sauce.
  • For a quick and delicious dish, stir-fry sliced cabbage with ginger, garlic, chillies and a bit of soy sauce.

Are There Any Side Effects of Eating Cabbage?

Cabbages also have a few side effects like any other vegetable, some of them include:

  • Foodborne illnesses
  • Bloating
  • Goitre
  • Flatulence
  • Colic in babies

FAQs

  1. What Are the Different Varieties of Cabbage?

There are 7 varieties of cabbage – red cabbage, Choy sum, Bok choy, Savoy cabbage, Napa cabbage, Cannonball cabbage, January king cabbage.

 

2. Apply to sore joints.

You can place a leaf of cabbage on a sore joint and it will help pull out the inflammation, I have done this and felt the benefits.

 

**If Pregnant talk to your doctor about eating cabbage too often**

 

The information is provided on this website is for entertainment and general information purposes only.

While I aim to provide up-to-date information, I make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose.

You are reading of the information on this website is of your own free will and you are taking the provided information at your own risk.

The information we provide is for entertainment purposes only. I am  not providing medical, legal or other professional advice.  And will not be liable for anything you choose to do on your own. In fact I always suggest you talk to your own doctor before trying anything.

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Bone and Joint Health, Bone Health, Grateful, Inflammation, Knee, Weather, Weather and Joint Pain

Bombogenesis and Joint Pain

I’ve heard a lot about Bombogenesis, it’s a popular term used by meteorologists, occurs when a midlatitude cyclone rapidly intensifies, dropping at least 24 millibars over 24 hours. A millibar measures atmospheric pressure.

Remember your great-aunt used to to say she “feels” a storm coming on, she was probably predicting the weather with some accuracy. You probably laughed.

But now you know exactly what she meant.

Barometric pressure is the weight of the atmosphere that surrounds us. Barometric pressure often drops before bad weather.

Lower air pressure pushes less against the body, allowing tissues to expand. Expanded tissues can put pressure on joints and cause pain.

Arthritis and joint pain affects everything within the joint, including the lining and ligaments.

All of those tissues have nerve endings that can feel changes in the weather, which may result in tightness, stiffness, and some discomfort.

So if you plan to be active in cold weather or high altitude, warm up first with stretching exercises and wear appropriate clothing

The Arthritis Foundation published a study from Tufts University in 2007 that found that every 10-degree drop in temperature corresponded with an incremental increase in arthritis pain. In addition, low temperatures, low barometric pressure and precipitation can increase pain. Researchers are not sure why weather changes cause pain, but suspect that certain atmospheric conditions increase swelling in the joint.

As for weather-related pain, it hurts, but it’s only temporary. Your joints should return to normal as soon as the barometric pressure increases and the temperature goes up. Your great aunt may be able to predict calm weather, too, as she feels less joint pain.

Song of The Day : California Dreaming Mamas And Papas

Resource Link

https://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/tools-resources/weather/

Posted in Awareness, Inflammation, Life, Pain

Food – Inflammation and Pain – Part 3

Part 3 of 4

What is pain?

Pain occurs when something hurts, causing an uncomfortable or unpleasant feeling. The presence of pain often means that something is wrong. Each individual is the best judge of his or her own pain.

 

Chronic or acute inflammation

These are the two types of inflammation that differ in how quickly symptoms escalate and how long they last.

 

Acute pain usually comes on suddenly and is caused by something specific. It is sharp in quality. Acute pain usually does not last longer than six months. It goes away when there is no longer an underlying cause for the pain. Causes of acute pain include:

  • Surgery
  • Broken bones
  • Dental work
  • Burns or cuts
  • Labor and childbirth

After acute pain goes away, a person can go on with life as usual.

Chronic pain is pain that is ongoing and usually lasts longer than six months. This type of pain can continue even after the injury or illness that caused it has healed or gone away. Pain signals remain active in the nervous system for weeks, months, or years. Some people suffer chronic pain even when there is no past injury or apparent body damage. Chronic pain is linked to conditions including:

  • Headache
  • Arthritis
  • Osteonecrosis
  • Cancer
  • Nerve pain
  • Back pain
  • Fibromyalgia pain

People who have chronic pain can have physical effects that are stressful on the body. These include tense muscles, limited ability to move around, a lack of energy, and appetite changes. Emotional effects of chronic pain include depression, anger, anxiety, and fear of re-injury. Such a fear might limit a person’s ability to return to their regular work or leisure activities.

 

 

Fast facts on inflammation

Inflammation is the body’s attempt at self-protection to remove harmful stimuli and begin the healing process.

Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response.

Infections, wounds, and any damage to tissue would not be able to heal without an inflammatory response.

 

 

Chronic inflammation can eventually cause several diseases and conditions, including some cancers and rheumatoid arthritis.

 

Is inflammation painful?

When people have inflammation, it often hurts.

 

People will feel pain, stiffness, discomfort, distress, and even agony, depending on the severity of the inflammation.

 

The type of pain varies. It can be described as constant and steady, throbbing and pulsating, stabbing, or pinching.

 

Inflammation primarily causes pain because the swelling pushes against the sensitive nerve endings.

 

This sends pain signals to the brain.

Other biochemical processes also occur during inflammation. They affect how nerves behave, and this can enhance pain.

 

Anti-inflammatory medications

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can be taken to alleviate the pain caused by inflammation.

They counteract an enzyme that contributes to inflammation. This either prevents or reduces pain.

Examples of NSAIDs include naproxen, ibuprofen, and aspirin, which are available to purchase online

 

They say avoid the long-term use of NSAIDs unless advised by a doctor. They increase a person’s risk of stomach ulcers, which can result in severe, life-threatening bleeding.

 

 

NSAIDs may also worsen asthma symptoms, cause kidney damage, and increase the risk of having a stroke or heart attack

 

 

Acetaminophen, such as paracetamol or Tylenol, can reduce pain without affecting the inflammation. But to much can harm liver.

 

They may be ideal for those wishing to treat just the pain while allowing the healing factor of the inflammation to run its course

 

Corticosteroids

 

Corticosteroids, such as cortisol, are a class of steroid hormones that prevent a number of mechanisms involved in inflammation.

But they do have risks.

 

There are two sets of corticosteroids:

Glucocorticoids: These are prescribed for a range of conditions, including:

arthritis

temporal arteritis

dermatitis

inflammatory bowel disease (IBS)

systemic lupus

hepatitis

asthma

allergic reactions

sarcoidosis

Creams and ointments may be prescribed for inflammation of the skin, eyes, lungs, bowels, and nose.

Mineralocorticoids: These are used to treat cerebral salt wasting, and to replace important hormones for patients with adrenal insufficiency.

The side effects of corticosteroids are more likely if taken by mouth. Taking them with inhalers or injections can reduce the risk.

Inhaled medications, such as those used long-term to treat asthma, raise the risk of developing oral thrush. Rinsing the mouth out with water after each use can help prevent oral thrush.

Glucocorticoids can also cause Cushing’s syndrome, while mineralocorticoids can cause high blood pressure, low blood potassium levels, connective tissue weakness, and problems with the levels of acids and alkalis in body tissue.

 

Steroids also cause Osteonecrosis a painful condition that effects the bones and joints

 

Creams with steroids have been known to thin skin also.

 

Steroid injections like kenalog can also harm cartilage in knee or joints.

Can also make pain worse.

 

See my posts on Osteonecrosis here.

 

Osteonecrosis Link

 

 

Herbs for inflammation

Discuss any possible use of herbal supplements with a doctor. Never just start taking anything without the consent of your family doctor or orthopedic: Risk of drug interactions

 

 

Harpagophytum procumbens: Also known as devil’s claw, wood spider, or grapple plant, this herb comes from South Africa and is related to sesame plants. Some research has shown it may have anti-inflammatory properties.

 

 

Hyssop: This is mixed with other herbs, such as licorice, for the treatment of some lung conditions, including inflammation. The essential oils of hyssop can lead to life-threatening convulsions in laboratory animals. Caution is advised.

 

 

 

Ginger: This has been used for hundreds of years to treat dyspepsia, constipation, colic, and other gastrointestinal problems, as well as rheumatoid arthritis pain. Ginger may be purchased online in supplement form.

 

 

 

Turmeric: Current research is looking into the possible beneficial effects of turmeric in treating arthritis, Alzheimer’s , and some other inflammatory conditions.

 

Curcumin, a substance found in turmeric, is being invested for the treatment of several illnesses and disorders, including inflammation. But it’s known to thin the blood. Talk to your doctor !!!

 

 

Cannabis: This contains a cannabinoid called cannabichromene, which has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties. However, cannabis is not legal in many places.

 

Remember

There are several foods that can have been shown to help reduce the risk of inflammation, including:

olive oil

tomatoes

nuts, such as walnuts and almonds

leafy greens, including spinach and kale

fatty fish, such as salmon and mackerel

fruit, including blueberries and oranges

Avoid eating foods that aggravate inflammation, including:

fried foods, including French fries

white bread, pastry, and other foods that contain refined carbohydrates

soda and sugary drinks

red meat

margarine and lard

While these dietary solutions do not alone hold the key to controlling inflammation, they can help prime the immune system to react in a measured way.

 

 

Anti-inflammatory diet

To reduce levels of inflammation, aim for an overall healthy diet. If you’re looking for an eating plan that closely follows the tenets of anti-inflammatory eating, consider the Mediterranean diet, which is high in fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains, fish, and healthy oils.

 

Or a plant based Vegan lifestyle

 

Or a flexitarian lifestyle mostly plant based but on occasion will eat fish, chicken turkey and rarely beef lamb or pork.

 

In addition to lowering inflammation, a more natural, less processed diet can have noticeable effects on your physical and emotional health.

 

I noticed after we went to a mostly plant based lifestyle if we or I needed a break or just thought we wanted so old favorites, certain things you noticed afterwards more tired- or if a restaurant used way to much salt ( which most do).

 

A healthy diet is beneficial not only for reducing the risk of chronic diseases, but also for improving mood and overall quality of life.

 

 

HBO Hyperbaric Oxygen is also great at helping to lower inflammation in the body, help wounds heal,

 

Some are fda approved and some not. But let’s face it the fda isn’t the quickest area of government .

I will do a post on HBOT this weekend

Because we all could benefit from using it in my own opinion. It’s a shame it’s not very affordable, especially if it’s not on the fda approved list….. yet

 

 

 

 

Stay tuned part 4 coming soon.

 

Posted in Awareness, Disease, Health, Inflammation

Food-Inflammation and Pain part 2

part 2 of 4

When you have a fire that starts on your stove you might run to grab a fire extinguisher, or try to toss a lid on fire to try and smother it or turn your gas knob off to the stove you sure as hell wouldn’t crank the heat higher or pour water water on a grease fire.

Yet we allow and feed our body’s the wrong things and increase the inflammation in our body. 🔥

This causes us more pain, more discomfort and more disease. We do this by eating too much sugar,to much salt,fat,animal products, way too many processed foods too many fast food stops and just consuming garbage food with very little to no nutritional value.

 

If you suffer with chronic pain, or a chronic condition what we eat is vital to our health, a few changes in your diet could really improve your health and lower your pain. It may not be a cure all but it can lower the inflammation that adds to our pain.

At least that’s what I did to help my pain.

Am I painfree? I wish…. but no.

But I am giving my body the nutrients it needs. And my pain is less.

And my other reward is better Blood pressure, far lower cholesterol levels and less pain and bloat.

 

The foods we eat can either raise or lower the levels of inflammation in the body.

 

Eating fewer pro-inflammatory foods and eating more anti-inflammatory foods can be part of an overall strategy for coping with chronic pain and inflammation in the body.

 

We need to provide the body with vital nutrients so we start to reduce the inflammation in our body.

 

Less inflammation -less pain- better health

 

Cellular inflammation can be a silent threat. We may not feel anything when it begins.

But once started, we can experience all types of issues and disease like heart disease, cancer, chronic pain, muscle pain , joints and blood vessels.

 

We see the consequences of inflammation in scar tissue buildup, decreased flexibility, the acceleration of joint degeneration and hardening of the arteries.

We see its interaction with other chronic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, or even neurological disease.

 

 

Every meal we consume affects our health either in a positive or negative way.  If our diets consist mainly of heavily processed foods and animal products, rich in saturated fats, oils, salt and sugar, we are creating an environment that encourages chronic degenerative disease.

 

 

However, by giving our bodies superior nutrition, we can avoid food addictions,  encourage longevity, and support our immune system that resists disease.  It’s never too late to start.  Begin a healthy lifestyle today, and you’ll soon notice how much better you feel!

 

Give it 2-3-4 weeks.

 

Get that journal out and track your progress.

 

 

First talk to your doctor and tell him you want to add more healthy foods in your life.

 

Start out easy

When I started I removed some unhealthy foods and replaced with 2 good.

 

Example instead of having peanut butter crackers, try peanut butter or your favorite nut or seed butter and replace crackers with a banana or celery sticks or an apple

 

If your still on the white bread trans wagon try to something new and better like the ones below so much more flavor and texture.

 

Best Whole Grain Bread

 

Dave’s Killer Bread Thin-Sliced Organic 21 Whole Grains and Seeds.

Arnold Whole Grains: Double Fiber.

Ezekiel 4:9 Low Sodium Sprouted Whole Grain Bread- My personal favorite when I eat bread.

Rudi’s Gluten-Free Multigrain Bread

 

Another thing we did is remove meat from several meals

We started out with no meat Monday-Wednesday-Friday

We had veggie dinners or oven baked salmon ( well we tried it we don’t like salmon much)

So we had grilled or baked tuna steaks-cod-trout-haddock and pollock

Thankfully I never was a soda pop drinker it’s rare I’d have pop if I did it would be squirt.

Never a cola fan.

But if you like your pop or soda daily whether it’s regular or diet cut back and replace it with water or herbal tea.

I’m not saying you can never have a cinnamon roll again or your favorite cookie.

But it’s not wise to eat a fast food breakfast sandwich and lunch run to the local hot dog shop then because your worked late called for pizza for dinner.

It’s about small changes and they add up to a healthier you.

Next part we will have some more tips and recipes that you and your family are sure to love…

Posted in Awareness, Disease, Education, Inflammation

Food – Inflammation And Pain Part 1 of 4

Part 1 of 4

 

When you are in pain, what you eat can have a huge impact on how you feel and your health period.

If you don’t get the proper vitamins to heal, you can prolong the pain that you are in.

In addition, certain foods can help fight inflammation, while other foods can make you feel worse.

If your in pain after an injury, or you have a condition that causes pain, you can get some relief by just eating a better.

You can also improve your mood, get better sleep, and help the healing process all with the food that you eat each day.

The Unhealthy Food You Eat Will Probably Make Your Pain Feel Worse

Junk food does a lot more to than make us gain weight.

When we eat foods that are high in sugar, this can cause pain to become worse.

Sugar can cause inflammation in the body, which is only going to add to your overall pain.

Plus if you eat food that is high in fat, you we be feeling sluggish rundown and tired all the time.

When you eat food that doesn’t provide any nutritional value, your body won’t be able to heal as easily.

Sure we may all eat a cookie or 2 or pressed for time and hit the local drive through but we cannot do that on a regular basis.

I noticed this when I started to keep a pain journal. If you want to start one here is how.

Before I get back to food inflammation and pain.

The Things to Include in Your Pain Journal 

What exactly do you log in a pain journal? Everybody uses their journal differently, but most practitioners advise including the following:

  • Give your pain a scale rating. Most pain scales  use the 0-10 rating system, with 0 representing no pain and 10 representing the worst imaginable pain. Your pain will usually fall somewhere in between.
  • Use pain descriptor words. Is your pain burning? Tingling? Pulsating? Using pain descriptor words in your journal can help you track changes and patterns in your pain quality. It can also help doctors pinpoint your type of pain.
  • Track the time of day pain occurs. Do you hurt more in the morning or the evening? How are your afternoons?
  • Note what you are doing when your pain begins. Did you just get out of bed, or had you been sitting for a while when your pain started? Were you exercising or overusing certain muscles in your body? Write down how you feel after activities, such as walking the dog or playing with the kids.
  • Look at elements that might contribute to your pain. Think about the external factors that may add to the pain, such as if you suffer from stiff joints; does this happen when it’s raining or cold outside?
  • Write down what you ate and drank that day. Foods and beverages may contribute to or worsen the pain you are experiencing. Jot down everything you ingested the day you feel pain.
  • Describe your mood. It’s also important to note your mental state and how you feel when experiencing pain. Are you depressed? Anxious? Fatigued? Obviously, the pain might be triggering these emotions, and your doctor may recommend you see a mental health specialist to deal with the feelings that arise as a result of your chronic pain.

You can also get apps like

Catch my pain

My pain diary

Are excellent apps.

Armed with your pain journal, your next visit to your health practitioner may be that much more helpful.

Now back to food

You Need Vitamins and Minerals to Help Your Body Heal

Sore and tired muscles, broken bones, joint replacements, bone disorders pulled and torn muscles and tendons all need the right vitamins and minerals in order to heal properly.

In the event of a broken bone, eating calcium-rich foods such as milk and cheese will help speed along your healing.

When your muscles are tight, eating nutrient-dense foods such as fruits and vegetables will give you the vitamins and minerals you need for your muscles to regenerate.

Healing takes time, and it will take you less time when you give your body the right nutrients.

Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are often the culprits that cause pain, decreased joint mobility and even limit our desire to enjoy an active lifestyle. Visions of long hikes, tennis games, playing a little three-on-three basketball, or dancing the night away may encourage you to take that leap – or limp – into hip it knee replacement surgery.

A Healthy Diet Will Improve Your Pain and Your Mood

Your diet can have a big impact on your overall mood and your pain.

When you are getting the right nutrition, you won’t feel tired.

You will be able to get through your day without reaching for sugary, calorie-laden snacks. Eating well helps your mind and body.

Pain management can be a difficult process. When you are in pain, dealing with the pain can produce a negative mood. Eating healthy gives your body the tools it needs to feel better. When you have the right nutrients, your pain levels will decrease. You will have less inflammation in your body when you stay away from foods laden with sugar. Over time, your mood will improve the longer you eat healthier. If you are suffering in pain and aren’t sure what to do, it’s time to look at dietary changes you can make to feel better.

Talk with your doctor about what is best for you.

You should be checked for any deficiencies like vitamin d,b vitamins , folate, iron, magnesium, niacin, if you have a clit disorder talk to your doctor about how much or how little greens you should have or avoid, if on a statin as about supplements like coq10 and krill oil.

We have one body and it wants to heal…..

Stay tuned for part 2

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, High Heel Shoes, Inflammation, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain

High Heels When You Have Bone Problems

Not the best idea I had, but let’s be real I’m 5’3 and I needed to wear heels 👠 or my pants would be dragging all over the floor.

Also I can fudge my way through hemming pants but I’d do much better if I owned a sewing machine.

But I since I wore these darn shoes I jacked up my knees the good one and the not so good one.

I am ready to throw them out that’s how bad my knees hurt.

So I am a mess this week.

I mean I cannot believe the pain and discomfort I feel.

So I did some research and did you know high heels are terrible on on body , not just the feet !

The entire body.

High heel lovers it’s time to confirm what you may have long suspected: heels aren’t great for your health.

This revelation may not really be that surprising considering high heels essentially force you to teeter around on your tip-toes all day, but what may come as a shock is exactly how much damage they are capable of doing.

Put it this way, it’s not just your feet that suffer.

Feet

Let’s start at the bottom and work our way up. What do high heels do to your feet? Short answer: nothing good.

“There’s some good evidence that when ladies walk in a high heel shoe, there is increased pressure on the front part of the foot,” Associate Professor Lloyd Reed from the QUT School of Clinical Sciences in podiatry told The Huffington Post Australia. “Particularly under the big toe joint, the first metatarsal.

“A lot of weight gets shifted over to the front there, and there is less pressure out near the little toe.

“The types of problems that we see [as a result of this] is something like a bunion on the big toe joint, or hallux valgus.

“Other problems can include corns and calluses on the feet, especially under the ball of the foot and then on the tops of the toes.

The pain under the ball of the foot is called metatarsalgia.

There is also something called Plantar fasciitis which some people would refer to as ‘heel spur syndrome’ which is pain directly under the heel.”

So reconsider your high heel addiction, take into account what Reed refers to as Haglund’s Deformity (mmmm. Sexy).

“That’s a bump on the back of the heel which can be quite painful when ladies are wearing their dress heels or court shoes,” Reed said. “It may be associated with using high heels for prolonged period.”

Not that pain is going to stop women from wearing heels any time soon. As Reed points out, one American study found 42 percent of women wore high heels in spite of pain for aesthetic reasons.

“There’s even some evidence to suggest women more likely to have inappropriately fitting shoes than blokes, even into older age,” Reed said. “And of course, people who have the worst fit in shoes are more likely to have problems with calluses and bunions and so on.

“Some of that also has to do with the style of high heel. For instance I know the fit of the shoe often has a tapered toe and narrow upper section, and that in itself can be a problem for the feet.”

Knees

“What happens when you wear high heels is that your heel is raised off the ground, which in turn makes your body start to push forward,” Associate Professor Kevin Netto and Director of Research at the School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science at Curtin University told The Huffington Post Australia.

“So you set up what is known as sheer force in your knee. Basically, the front part of your body is trying to fall forward and you are trying to pull it backwards by keeping yourself upright. It’s a constant battle.

“That’s why most people who wear really high heels will find their knees hurt rather than their ankles. Basically because of the sheer force you set up in your knee.”

Knee osteoarthritis is much more common in females than males in all ages. In fact the prevalence is about 30 percent higher in females.

In terms of the actual damage caused to a regular high heel wearer, Netto has this to say:

“If you cut their knees open, it would be a pretty disgusting mess. Cartilage in your knee helps cushion forces, and if you are wearing heels every day you keep tearing on it and pulling on it and pulling on it. As such, it tends to become quite worn, and that’s not something you can regenerate. It’s not regenerative material.”

Adds Reed: “There is evidence that when person walks [in high heels] they do a couple of things, and one of these is to increase the bending of the knee in order to improve their walking and adjust to the fact their ankle is not going to move as much.

“The consequences of this is it produces much more pressure, or more load, in the inside edge of the knee, in the medial compartment of the knee joint.

“Now, the medial compartment of the knee joint is the most common place for knee arthritis, and it has been shown knee osteoarthritis is much more common in females than males in all ages. In fact the prevalence is about 30 percent higher in females.”

Lower back

“There is a common thinking that when it comes to the back, what’s called the lumbar lordosis or the curve at the lower back will increase with higher heeled shoes,” Reed told HuffPost Australia.

“Scientific research is not conclusive with that. It’s very common on the internet but the scientific research is mixed on that front.

“What there is lots of evidence for is the increase in muscle activity in the lower back. Also there’s some increase in the abdominal muscles and, for some people, there’s an increase in muscle activity in the thoracic region of the spine and the neck.

“So effectively the increase in muscle demand can go right up through the body, from foot to leg to the lower back, to the middle back, up to the neck.”

“I challenge anybody to say they walk normally in really high heels. You don’t need a PhD in bio-mechanics to explain that one. Just look at someone’s gait.

Injuries

Put simply, those who wear high heels are at risk of doing themselves an injury. (Yes, even if you’re super talented at walking in the highest of stilettos, this means you.)

“Wearing high heels effects your centre of mass, which is basically the balance point in the body,” Netto said.

“Everyone has a balance point in their body, and to maintain your balance, you have to keep this little balance point over your base of support, which is your feet, basically. If you lose your balance then your balance point moves outside where it’s supposed to be.

“When you wear heels, you bring the balance point in your body higher, so you become less stable and much more prone to falling etc.

“The higher the heel, the more you are going to raise your centre of mass, and the more unstable you are going to become, which means you have a higher potential of falling.”

For those who are reading this thinking, ‘yeah… but I’m great at walking in heels, so this doesn’t apply to me’, Netto has this to say:

“I challenge anybody to say they walk normally in really high heels. You don’t need a PhD in bio-mechanics to explain that one. Just look at someone’s gait.”

According to Reed, a study over a ten-year period (from 2002-2012) in the United States revealed the rate of injuries suffered by ladies wearing high heels doubled within the decade (though they’re not sure why).

The highest rate of those injured were within the age bracket of 20 – 29, followed closely by 30-39

“The most common injury was a sprain or a strain in the foot or the ankle,” Reed said.

“There was also a similar study done in Victoria, conducted from 2006 – 2010, which looked at the number of injuries presenting to emergency departments which were directly attributed to a high heel shoe.

“All of the people injured were less than 55 years of age, and the most common injury was an ankle injury, which doesn’t really come as a surprise, as when ankle is flexed, it’s more prone to ankle sprains.”

Interestingly, most ladies presented with their injuries on Sunday mornings between 8am and 12pm.

“So perhaps due to a Saturday night injury,” Reed said. “We don’t know this for sure, but that’s what we may infer.”

More injuries were also reported in the summer months.

Recommendations

“Obviously we would recommend people don’t spend a lot of time in high heels,” Reed told HuffPost Australia. “And even if they have to wear a high heel, try and get the shape of the shoe to be slightly rounder or broader toe box to fit the foot. if possible.

“Sometimes we suggest that even if there’s a bit of heel height, a larger width of heel might be advantageous, particularly with the slip risk.”

Netto was more to the point.

“Don’t wear them. It’s pretty bloody simple,” he said. “It’s a bit like smoking, if you don’t want to get lung cancer, don’t smoke. If you don’t want a bad back and bad knees, don’t wear heels.

“Even if you feel you have to wear them, you don’t have to wear stilettos. They just aren’t called for. If you are going to have to wear something, wear something light and stay on your feet as little as possible.

“Look, in terms of recommendations, I’m not going to say very much. I don’t want to be an advocate for them.”

Reference

https://m.huffingtonpost.com.au/2016/08/17/this-is-what-wearing-heels-all-day-does-to-your-body_a_21453115/

Posted in Adrenals, Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Awareness, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Delicious, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Hashimoto, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, SONK, SPONK, Uncategorized, Vegetables, WegoHealth, wellness

Healthy Eating

Developing healthy eating habits isn’t as confusing or as restrictive as many people imagine. The essential steps are to eat mostly foods derived from plants—vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes (beans, peas, lentils)—and limit highly processed foods.

 

For most of my life, I ate the standard American diet and meals that were heavy in meat and processed foods. I went to a vegetarian lifestyle in high school for a couple years then back to the old way.

When i was diagnosed with Osteonecrosis, Osteoarthritis HBP etc and especially when my husband had a heart attack in 2016 I thought enough was enough.

I got rid of a lot of processed foods, potato chips, convenience meals, and loved Oreo’s and Nutter Butter cookies. There was a lot of sugar, oil, and junk in my diet.

We quit smoking 2 years ago almost. and we as a team decided to go part time but mostly vegan .

Me having a few issues from Osteonecrosis, Osteoarthritis, Hashimot’s and Hypothyroidism and Adrenal Fatigue left me in pain and always exhausted.

I had been dealing with pain in my knee and back for a few years. My mind wants to go go go like it did 25 years ago, my knees say oh hell no slow down woman. And this extra weight is just hard on the bones. But when your limited by many bone issues its really hard to just walk 3-4 miles a day. I bike 3-4 miles a day but its not the same as a good hike in the woods. I do go now and then walking in the woods but hiking I’m afraid for now all that has been on hold.

Going to mostly plant based has helped my pain. And my energy.

So its working and I am feeling better slowly …..

Its a process…

Don’t just go all I went to 65 percent of eating all veggies daily  then added more from there. Some days i eat no meat or fish and some days i will. I Slowly cut out animal products, starting with the easiest and leaving barrier foods to the end. Slowly lessened  my consumption of animal products while simultaneously increasing the number of plant-based foods in our diet.

I spoke to my doctors and I will post tomorrow just how i got started

 

 

plantsz

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Endocrinologist, Factor V Leiden, Hashimoto, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, Lemon, Sunshine

Sunshine Blogger Award

I am always humbled and honored when someone nominates me for a blogger award.

Out of so many bloggers, you thought of me.

Thank you, Christine , for nominating me for the Sunshine blogger award.

Thank you for sharing your information and knowledge to the world. I hope you enjoy your retirement

Here are the rules:

• Thank blogger(s) who nominated you for the blog post and link back to their blog if possible.

• Answer the 5 questions the blogger asked you.

• Nominate 5 new blogs to receive the award and write them 5 new questions.

• List the rules and display Sunshine Blogger Award logo in your post and/or blog

1. Is it sunny where you are today? Today no it’s raining in Ohio

2. Why did you start your blog? I started blogging to bring awareness to disorders like Osteonecrosis-Osteoarthritis-Hypothyroidism-Now Hashimoto and how eating healthy can combat pain and inflammation

3. How long have you been blogging?

About 2 years but I’m still learning as I go.

4. Give us some information on your platform. I wrote about my health challenges and how I am changing how I eat to feel better.

5. What food reminds you of sunshine? Anything made with lemons.

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Eat Healthy, exercise, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, Positivity, spondylolisthesis, Uncategorized, Weather

Bones

It still looks like winter out in NE Ohio today even though it’s

07 April 2018.

This is what I woke up to . But I also woke up to pain as well. I mean every bone in my body hurts today.

It’s weird hearing the birds of spring singing away while there is a fresh 3 inches of snow on the ground.

Still be chilled to the bone during winter and now spring is bad for the bones , very little sun, less exercise outdoors, and the drastic swings in the temperature are also painful. One day it’s rainy and 50 today it’s snowy and 30.

I try to stay moving in spite of the weather by riding my recumbent bike.

But I would really like to get outside and breath some fresh air.

On average Ohio has 60 sunny days a year and about 90 partly sunny days a year ( I think that’s a bit high as well)

And Orlando Florida has 233 sunny days a year. That’s a big difference.

No wonder why we have to take vitamin D supplements here.

I’d still prefer to get my vitamin D the natural way.

Less sun means that your body is making less Vitamin D. Vitamin D is produced when sunlight hits the skin and triggers a series of chemical reactions to produce Vitamin D.

People like me in northern latitudes with less year round sun exposure have to be very mindful of the fact that our bodies do not produce this essential vitamin in large enough quantities. In order to counteract the lack of sunlight, more Vitamin D supplements should be consumed during the winter months in order to keep the bones healthy and strong.

A healthy balanced diet will help you build strong bones from an early age and maintain them throughout your life.

We need sufficient calcium to strengthen our bones and vitamin D to help your body absorb calcium.

Poor bone health can cause conditions such as rickets and osteoporosis and increase the risk of breaking a bone from a fall later in life.

You should be able to get all the nutrients you need for healthy bones by eating healthy.

A good diet is only one of the building blocks for healthy bones, we need physical activity and a little bit of weight lifting.

Food for Strong Bones

A healthy balanced diet will help you build strong bones from an early age and maintain them throughout your life.

You need sufficient calcium to strengthen your bones and vitamin D to help your body absorb calcium.

Poor bone health can cause conditions such as rickets and osteoporosis and increase the risk of breaking a bone from a fall.

Requirements

Adults need 700mg of calcium a day. You should be able to get all the calcium you need by eating a varied and balanced diet.

Good sources of calcium include:

• milk, cheese,yogurt eggs and other dairy foods

• green leafy vegetables, such as broccoli, cabbage and okra, collards,asparagus, artichokes , peas.

• soybeans

• tofu

• nuts

• fish like tuna and salmon and also fish where you eat the bones, such as sardines and pilchards

Although spinach might appear to contain a lot of calcium, it also contains oxalic acid, which reduces calcium absorption, and it is therefore not a good source of calcium.

It is difficult to get all the vitamin D we need from our diet and we get most of our vitamin D from the action of the sun on our skin.

Winter and early springs temperatures can bring on a gloomy mood, sending your body into chronic stress and that triggers the production of cortisol . Cortisol destroyer of bone

Clouds the mood buster.

So yes I can’t wait for sun and warmer temperatures

Warm weather improves more than just your mood.

It turns out that warm, sunny weather actually boosts brain function in multiple ways. The study found that the more time people spent outdoors in the spring, the better their memory, cognitive function, and mood.

So I am anxiously awaiting spring to finally arrive. My bones will be so glad when the weather gets warmer.

At least the Sun is out today.

Just remember if you have bone problems take care of yourself and eat healthy.

I will probably have a heating pad on my knee later but for now I am just going to try and keep busy.

And enjoying the beautiful winter/spring day hopefully for the day until next winter.

#Osteonecrosis

#Osteoarthritis

#Spondylolisthesis

#BoneHealth

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Factor V Leiden, Inflammation, Osteonecrosis, Pain, Rare Disease Day, RareDisease, SONK, SPONK, The Mighty, Uncategorized, WegoHealth

Rare Disease Day Is Today

Rare Disease Day 28 February 2018

#ShowYourRare

#AvascularNecrosis

#Osteonecrosis

#RareDiseaseDay

Debbie in TheMighty2016

https://themighty.com/2016/07/receiving-an-osteonecrosis-diagnosis-what-to-know/

http://www.ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Cancer, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Disclaimer, Ease your Stress, Energy, Happiness, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, Pain, Sleep Better, Thoughts, Uncategorized

Relax and Help Pain & Anxiety Through Various Techniques

I used to be stressed all the time. Especially when trying to manage life with one or two chronic conditions.

Now it’s occasional stress and pain all depends…..

But I have found some relief and I believe it’s because I have learned to relax using a variety of methods. My favorite is breathing 4-7-8 I read about this from Dr Andrew Weil .

This is followed by the five-step procedure listed below:

1 Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound.

2 Close your mouth and inhale quietly through your nose to a mental count of four.

3 Hold your breath for a count of seven.

4 Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound to a count of eight.

5 This is one breath. Now inhale again and repeat the cycle three more times for a total of four breaths.

Dr Andrew Weil emphasizes the most important part of this process is holding your breath for eight seconds. This is because keeping the breath in will allow oxygen to fill your lungs and then circulate throughout the body. It is this that produces a relaxing effect in the body.

I personally find it relaxing and you can use it anytime you feel stress and or anxiety.

I’ve tried a few things and this is the topic for today.

Daily I use

I use breathing 4-7-8i

I also am grateful for everything

Weekly

EFT Tapping (more about that below)

I also practice mindful meditation a few days a week when I walk especially.

I want to share with you ways that helped me, and maybe they can help you.

Make sure you get the ok from your doctor before starting anything new.

Relaxation Techniques
Using the Relaxation Response to Relieve Stress

For many of us, relaxation means zoning out in front of the TV at the end of a stressful day. But this does little to reduce the damaging effects of stress that add to disease and poor health. To effectively combat stress, we need to activate our body’s natural relaxation response.

You can do this by learning and practicing relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation, rhythmic exercise, and yoga.

Adding one or all of these activities into your life can help really reduce your everyday stress, and it will boost your mood, and improve your mental focus and physical health.

What is the relaxation response?
When stress overwhelms your nervous system, your body is flooded with chemicals that prepare you for “fight or flight.

Your stress response can be lifesaving in emergency situations where you need to act quickly. But when it’s constantly activated by the stresses of everyday life, it can wear your body down and take a toll on your-health both physical and emotional.

I was at my Naturopath’s a few months ago and she did what she called tapping. I felt this sense of peace and relief, like a huge weight was lifted from my shoulder.

If you’re like me and many other people, you feel trapped, whether it’s due to daily stress , work or school stress, family stress , stress that comes with having a chronic condition etc…we all can get caught in this cycle. The Stress Cycle

You’re tired of feeling sad, depressed, anxious, discontent, and unwell. You’re sick of the expensive and ineffective treatments. You’re fed up with relinquishing the power over your health and happiness to doctors.

You want to be your best, living a life that is filled with peacefulness, joy, and fulfillment, from day to day and moment to moment.

Tapping

Meditation

Yoga

Deep Breathing

These can all help I will post some links below to help you learn more.

No one can avoid all stress, but you can learn to how to counteract its detrimental effects in the body mind and spirit.

The relaxation response puts the brakes on stress and brings your body and mind back into a state of equilibrium.

When the relaxation response is activated, your:
heart rate slows down
breathing becomes slower and deeper
blood pressure drops or stabilizes
muscles relax
blood flow to the brain increases

In addition to its calming physical effects, the relaxation response also increases energy and focus, combats illness, relieves aches and pains, heightens problem-solving abilities, and boosts motivation and productivity. Best of all, anyone can reap these benefits with regular practice.

There is no single relaxation technique that is best for everyone. The right relaxation technique is the one that resonates with you, fits your lifestyle, and is able to focus your mind and interrupt your everyday thoughts to elicit the relaxation response.

You may even find that alternating or combining different techniques provide the best results.
How you react to stress may also influence the relaxation technique that works best for you:

The “fight” response. If you tend to become angry, agitated, or keyed up under stress, you may respond best to stress relief activities that quiet you down, such as meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, deep breathing, or guided imagery.

The “flight” response. If you tend to become depressed, withdrawn, or spaced out under stress, you may respond best to stress relief activities that areenergize your nervous system, such as rhythmic exercise, massage, mindfulness, or power yoga.

The immobilization response. If you’ve experienced some type of trauma and tend to “freeze” or become “stuck” under stress, your challenge is to first rouse your nervous system to a fight or flight response (above) so you can employ the applicable stress relief techniques. To do this, choose physical activity that engages both your arms and legs, such as running, dancing, or tai chi, and perform it mindfully, focusing on the sensations in your limbs as you move.

Deep breathing
With its focus on full, cleansing breaths, deep breathing is a simple yet powerful relaxation technique. It’s easy to learn, can be practiced almost anywhere, and provides a quick way to get your stress levels in check. Deep breathing is the cornerstone of many other relaxation practices, too, and can be combined with other relaxing elements such as aromatherapy and music. All you really need is a few minutes and a place to stretch out.

How to practice deep breathing

The key to deep breathing is to breathe deeply from the abdomen, getting as much fresh air as possible in your lungs. When you take deep breaths from the abdomen, rather than shallow breaths from your upper chest, you inhale more oxygen. The more oxygen you get, the less tense, short of breath, and anxious you feel.
Sit comfortably with your back straight. Put one hand on your chest and the other on your stomach.
Breathe in through your nose. The hand on your stomach should rise. The hand on your chest should move very little.
Exhale through your mouth, pushing out as much air as you can while contracting your abdominal muscles. The hand on your stomach should move in as you exhale, but your other hand should move very little.
Continue to breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth. Try to inhale enough so that your lower abdomen rises and falls. Count slowly as you exhale.
If you find it difficult breathing from your abdomen while sitting up, try lying down. Put a small book on your stomach, and breathe so that the book rises as you inhale and falls as you exhale.

Mindfulness meditation
Rather than worrying about the future or dwelling on the past, mindfulness meditation switches the focus to what’s happening right now, enabling you to be fully engaged in the present moment.

By focusing your attention on a single repetitive action, such as your breathing, other forms of mindfulness meditation encourage you to follow and then release internal thoughts or sensations. Mindfulness can also be applied to activities such as walking, exercising, or eating.
A basic mindfulness exercise:
1. Sit on a straight-backed chair or cross-legged on the floor.
2. Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling.
3. Once you’ve narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations, and thoughts.
4. Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.

Rhythmic movement and mindful exercise
The idea of exercising may not sound particularly soothing, but rhythmic exercise that gets you into a flow of repetitive movement can be very relaxing. Examples include:
Running
Walking
Swimming
Dancing
Rowing
Climbing
For maximum stress relief, add mindfulness to your workout
While simply engaging in rhythmic exercise will help you relieve stress, if you add a mindfulness component on top, you’ll get even more benefit.
As with meditation, mindful exercise requires being fully engaged in the present moment—paying attention to how your body feels right now, rather than your daily worries or concerns. In order to “turn off” your thoughts, focus on the sensations in your limbs and how your breathing complements your movement.
If you’re walking or running, for example, focus on the sensation of your feet touching the ground, the rhythm of your breath, and the feeling of the wind against your face. If your mind wanders to other thoughts, gently return to focusing on your breathing and movement.
Visualization
Visualization, or guided imagery, is a variation on traditional meditation that involves imagining a scene in which you feel at peace, free to let go of all tension and anxiety. Choose whatever setting is most calming to you, whether it’s a tropical beach, a favorite childhood spot, or a quiet wooded glen.
You can practice visualization on your own or with a therapist (or an audio recording of a therapist) guiding you through the imagery. You can also choose to do your visualization in silence or use listening aids, such as soothing music or a sound machine or recording that matches your chosen setting—the sound of ocean waves if you’ve chosen a beach, for example.
Practicing visualization
Close your eyes and imagine your restful place. Picture it as vividly as you can—everything you can see, hear, smell, taste, and feel.

Just “looking” at it like you would a photograph is not enough. Visualization works best if you incorporate as many sensory details as possible.
For example, if you are thinking about a dock on a quiet lake:
See the rise or set
Hear the birds singing
Smell the pine trees
Feel the cool water on your bare feet
Taste the fresh, clean air
Enjoy the feeling of your worries drifting away as you slowly explore your restful place. When you are ready, gently open your eyes and come back to the present.
Don’t worry if you sometimes zone out or lose track of where you are during a visualization session. This is normal. You may also experience feelings of heaviness in your limbs, muscle twitches, or yawning. Again, these are normal responses.
Yoga and tai chi
Yoga involves a series of both moving and stationary poses, combined with deep breathing. As well as reducing anxiety and stress, yoga can also improve flexibility, strength, balance, and stamina. Since injuries can happen when yoga is practiced incorrectly, it’s best to learn by attending group classes, hiring a private teacher, or at least following video instructions. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others, tailoring your practice as you see fit.

If you’re unsure whether a specific yoga class is appropriate for stress relief, call the studio or ask the teacher.
Tai chi
If you’ve seen a group of people in the park slowly moving in synch, you’ve probably witnessed tai chi. Tai chi is a self-paced, non-competitive series of slow, flowing body movements. By focusing your mind on the movements and your breathing, you keep your attention on the present, which clears the mind and leads to a relaxed state.
Tai chi is a safe, low-impact option for people of all ages and fitness levels, including older adults and those recovering from injuries. As with yoga, it’s best learned in a class or from a private instructor. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others.
Self-massage
You’re probably already aware how much a professional massage at a spa or health club can help reduce stress, relieve pain, and ease muscle tension. What you may not be aware of is that you can experience many of the same benefits at home or work by practicing self-massage—or trading massages with a loved one.
Try taking a few minutes to massage yourself at your desk between tasks, on the couch at the end of a hectic day, or in bed to help you unwind before sleep. To enhance relaxation, you can use aromatic oil, scented lotion, or combine self-message with mindfulness or deep breathing techniques.

Start a regular relaxation practice
Learning the basics of these relaxation techniques takes regular practice to truly harness their stress-relieving power.

Most stress experts recommend setting aside at least 10 to 20 minutes a day for your relaxation practice I mean we surely can find 10 minutes….If you’d like to maximize the benefits, work toward 30 minutes to an hour…I am still working on this myself. I’m good for 15 minutes.

Tips for making relaxation techniques part of your life
Set aside time in your daily schedule. If possible, schedule a set time once or twice a day for your practice.

If your schedule is already packed, remember that many relaxation techniques can be practiced while you’re doing other things.

Try meditating while commuting on the bus or train, taking a yoga or tai chi break at lunchtime, or practicing mindful walking while exercising your dog.

Just don’t practice this stuff when you’re sleepy. These techniques are so relaxing that they can make you very sleepy I have fallen asleep many times when learning to meditate or use sounds to help me relax.

However, you will get the most benefit if you practice when you’re fully alert.

Expect ups and downs. Don’t be discouraged if you skip a few days or even a few weeks. Just keep trying.

If you exercise, improve the relaxation benefits by adopting mindfulness, try focusing your attention on your body. If you’re resistance training, for example, focus on coordinating your breathing with your movements and pay attention to how your body feels.

Now tapping this provides relief from chronic pain, emotional problems, disorders, addictions, phobias, post traumatic stress disorder, and physical diseases. I read Tapping is newly set to revolutionize the field of health and wellness, the healing concepts that it’s based upon have been in practice in Eastern medicine for over 5,000 years.

Like acupuncture and acupressure, Tapping is a set of techniques which utilize the body’s energy meridian points. You can stimulate these meridian points by tapping on them with your fingertips – literally tapping into your body’s own energy and healing power.

The basic technique requires you to focus on the negative emotion at hand: a fear or anxiety, a bad memory, an unresolved problem, or anything that’s bothering you. While maintaining your mental focus on this issue, use your fingertips to tap 5-7 times each on 12 of the body’s meridian points.

Tapping on these meridian points – while concentrating on accepting and resolving the negative emotion – will access your body’s energy, restoring it to a balanced state.

You may be wondering about these meridians.

Put simply, energy circulates through your body along a specific network of channels. You can tap into this energy at any point along the system.

This concept comes from the doctrines of traditional Chinese medicine, which referred to the body’s energy as “ch’i.” In ancient times, the Chinese discovered 100 meridian points. They also discovered that by stimulating these meridian points, they could heal.

Call it energy, call it the Source, call it life force, call it ch’i… Whatever you want to call it, it works.

In some ways, Tapping is similar to acupuncture.

Like Tapping, acupuncture achieves healing through stimulating the body’s meridians and energy flow.

However, unlike Tapping, acupuncture involves needles! “No needles” is definitely one of the advantages of Tapping.

Here is a video of how to begin tapping to ease pain another video is to help anxiety

For Pain Relief. https://youtu.be/5hYE0Wt4Sxs,

https://youtu.be/tQRQn1NpkzA ,

Tapping PainRelief

Pain relief Tap version 2

All About EFT Tapping https://youtu.be/ZfZBHWSbrsg

Tapping helps to heal-many parts of your life TEDx

TEDx Tapping https://youtu.be/ZfZBHWSbrsg

Some other links for meditation

Meditation For Pain https://youtu.be/r3qBlVfPzXo

Tibetan Sounds Meditation https://youtu.be/RgqxZU6_qOY

Help chronic pain and disease https://youtu.be/gaY4m00wXpw

Yoga for beginners with disabilities Yoga if disabled https://youtu.be/tyeMFy9KkTY

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Bone Health, Food, Food Is Thy Medicine, Inflammation, Life, Thoughts, Uncategorized

Another New Diet~ See How They Compare

I have to laugh that every year there’s suddenly a miraculous diet that will help you lose weight feel your best , reverse many diseases etc…..

My personal opinion is that the Ornish way is best.

And has been proven to help heart disease , reduce pain and inflammation, reverse high blood pressure etc…

The best diet for our lifestyle and health is actually by Dr Ornish…..

it’s mostly plant based but allows for some poultry and fish.

Ornish Diet

Flexitarian: A semi-vegetarian diet with a focus on plant-based foods with occasional meat, poultry, or fish consumption.

The Dr. Dean Ornish Program for Reversing Heart Disease

https://www.ornish.com/proven-program/nutrition/

The Nutritarian Diet Dr Joel Fuhrman

Dr. Fuhrman’s Nutritarian food pyramid is based on the principles of high nutrient eating as illustrated by his Health Equation: Health = Nutrients / Calories (H = N / C) Low-calorie, nutrient dense foods are at the base of the pyramid, and high-calorie, nutrient poor foods are at the top.

https://www.drfuhrman.com/learn/the-nutritarian-diet

Dr Oz New Diet he will be discussing

The Pegan 365 diet is a program inspired by two of the best eating plans out there – vegan and paleo.

The Pegan 365 plan has been designed by Dr. Oz and his team of experts to help you eat healthier, lose weight, and keep the weight off year after year. Get started on Pegan 365 today with these helpful instructions.

Shopping List

On the Pegan 365 diet, you can easily follow this plan 365 days of the year. Just remember to have five or more cups of veggies, four healthy carbohydrates, three smart proteins (1 paleo protein and 2 vegan proteins), two healthy fats, and one non-dairy food item. Along with plenty of whole foods and fresh produce, you can also enjoy two drinks and two desserts each week. Heading to a party and want to indulge? You’re allowed one cheat day per week! Print out this grocery list and take it with you when you head to the store. With so much variety, you don’t have to worry about getting bored and disenchanted. Mix and match the items on the shopping list below to stay inspired all year round.

Recipes

http://www.doctoroz.com/recipe-collection/pegan-365-diet-recipe-box

Keto Diet

Just my opinion but I find it hard to believe that this is healthy….you may lose weight but what’s it doing to your arteries all that fat and meat ……

The ketogenic diet has been in existence for 90 years. The ketogenic diet was designed in 1924 by Dr. Russell Wilder at the Mayo Clinic. Despite being highly effective in treating epilepsy, it fell out of fashion due to the surge in new anti-seizure medications in the 1940s.

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/ketogenic-diet-101#section1

I think a person needs to talk to their doctor before just going on some new lifestyle diet…….

I have found out what works best for me it’s a combo of Dr Joel Fuhrman and Dr Dean Ornish

We have felt better than we have in a long time.

Dispute our health issues

Were helping reverse chronic pain inflammation help blood pressure

Sure we have a cheat day and we eat cake now and then but we eat mindfully.

And we will never eat any other way.

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Energy, exercise, Factor V Leiden, Food Is Thy Medicine, Heart Disease, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Positivity, SONK, StopTheClot, Thoughts, Uncategorized, Vision, Weather, WegoHealth, Winter, Women

1 year ago I decided to take my health back

Happy Anniversary To My Health….

I was always pretty healthy ….until I wasn’t.

I gained weight , injured my knee gained more weight was diagnosed with one thing after another and it was really exhausting.

First osteoarthritis and hypothyroidism at age 45

They torn meniscus age 51

Then thanks to the meniscus tear Osteonecrosis set in my knee….

Then she 53 diagnosed officially with spondylolisthesis and a bilateral pars fracture

I had the spondylolisthesis before but my former PCP never told me I had it. But I seen it on an old Mri.

The pain every where was exhausting and some days it still is.

But I decided the heck with all these doctors and I decided to eat mostly plant based but I do still eat chicken fish or turkey now and then and rarely beef.

I ride my recumbent bike 2x a day and I walk when I can. And some days even when I should rest I go walk anyway.

Today’s pictures and videos are from my morning walk : and it’s also one year ago I quit smoking……so it’s a great day !

Pain or no pain I’m not going to just sit around.

Sitting is death

Moving is life

And ya know after I’m done I feel so much better.

1 year since I’ve quit smoking after being a smoker for 40 years. My lungs are feel better my walking speed has improved my distance has improved

1 year since I started eating a healthy mostly plant based but I’m not a vegan and it’s good clean healthy real colorful food . I am using food as medicine in a way to fight pain and inflammation . Now sure I eat a cookie or 2 now and then just not every day. And all my other choices are good so I don’t deprive myself of a treat now and then.

And for having Osteonecrosis,Osteoarthritis, Spondylolisthesis with a bilateral pats fracture in my L5 S1 I feel pretty darn good today even in this cold weather.

Just need to drop some weight one step and one day at a time.

I have taken my life back and no one is going to stop me !

Tomorrow I may be in pain and that’s ok. I can accept that but as long as I know I am doing all I can to combat my pain and keep my body moving and providing it with the best nutrients possible(most of the time)

It’s a win win for me ,one day at a time !

Keep your meds , keep your cigarettes keep your junk fast food.

Body Heal Thy Self

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Food, Food Is Thy Medicine, Foodie, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, SPONK, StopTheClot, Thyroid

Pain Chronic Pain

Once we accept the reality of the current moment (no matter how unpleasant it may be) for what it is, and not what we wish it were, we can turn our attention to ways to improve it. This I find true in any situation.

Living with chronic pain can throw your life upside down.

It’s hard to believe that I can and have managed my rare disease Osteonecrosis (knee) pain. And my Osteoarthritis pain.

But the pain of spondylolisthesis somedays is truly unbearable. It can just take a fabulous day day and screw it all up.

Today is one of those days.

I try to stay busy , and positive when I really would like to go somewhere and just scream at the top of my lungs.

I don’t think my neighbors would appreciate it. So I bang away at the keyboard.

Since the weather in NE Ohio has changed I am having more and more days in pain.

And in the days when all the above hurt I’m down right miserable. Thank Hod that hasn’t happened yet , but then fall and winter have only begun….

I’m grateful today it’s just my back although it feels as if I have been kicked in my L5S1 several times.

Besides having spondylolisthesis I also for the past decade or longer been dealing with osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis since 2014.

If you don’t know what they are I will explain below.

Osteoarthritis

Sometimes called degenerative joint disease or degenerative arthritis, osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common chronic condition of the joints, affecting approximately 27 million Americans. OA can affect any joint, but it occurs most often in knees, hips, lower back and neck, small joints of the fingers and the bases of the thumb and big toe.

In normal joints, a firm, rubbery material called cartilage covers the end of each bone. Cartilage provides a smooth, gliding surface for joint motion and acts as a cushion between the bones. In OA, the cartilage breaks down, causing pain, swelling and problems moving the joint. As OA worsens over time, bones may break down and develop growths called spurs. Bits of bone or cartilage may chip off and float around in the joint. In the body, an inflammatory process occurs and cytokines (proteins) and enzymes develop that further damage the cartilage. In the final stages of OA, the cartilage wears away and bone rubs against bone leading to joint damage and more pain.

Who’s Affected?

Although OA occurs in people of all ages, osteoarthritis is most common in people older than 65. Common risk factors include increasing age, obesity, previous joint injury, overuse of the joint, weak thigh muscles, and genes.

One in two adults will develop symptoms of knee OA during their lives.

One in four adults will development symptoms of hip OA by age 85. Lucky me I developed Osteoarthritis at age 45.

One in 12 people 60 years or older have hand OA.

Osteonecrosis What it is….

Osteonecrosis of the Knee. Osteonecrosis of the knee (also known as avascular necrosis) and if in the knee from a meniscus tear also called Ahlbacks Disease is a painful condition that occurs when the blood supply to a section of bone in the femur (thighbone) or tibia (shinbone) is disrupted.

I have Osteonecrosis of the medial femoral condyle due to a meniscus tear in 2014. Strange no one wanted to fix it or have any treatment plan.

This pain is like no other. Your area of Osteonecrosis is ice cold yet it often can feel like it was hit by a lightening bolt.

Weather plays a huge factor for me and my pain. I used to love winter now I can barely tolerate a cool fall day. I dread winter.

I get sick of being in pain. If it’s not the knees it’s back or hands it’s just enough to jack up my day or make things more difficult than they already are.

I have found that plant based lifestyle has helped my osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis a lot. I can’t understand why I haven’t lost a ton of weight though. I mean I don’t eat half the unhealthy calories I used to . But hey the doctors says it’s a slow thyroid.

I just wish these 40 lbs would come off it would also help my bones.

But maybe that will just take time.

If you haven’t tried a plant based lifestyle I would highly recommend it.

My cholesterol numbers are fantastic and all my doctors are impressed especially since I rarely need pain medication vs taking 2 a day like I did 3 years ago.

I truly believe that food can be your medicine or your poison.

The choice is yours.

I will be posting a lot of info and recipes

I don’t always eat perfect but life is about compromise and I follow a 90 / 10 rule.

It’s ok to have a cookie or small cupcake just make sure you eat as best as you can most of the time .

Living food is the way to go.

It may not take away all your pain but wouldn’t it be a benefit if it took away a lot of it ? And made it more managed?

Absolutely!!!