Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Patient Leader, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards, WEGOHealthAwards2020

I Am A Nominee In The WEGOHealth Awards 2020

I am so honored to share that I am a nominee in the WEGOHealth Awards for Best In Show – Community and Patient Leader Hero

#WEGOHealthChat #WEGOHealthAwards #PatientLeader #Osteoarthritis #Osteonecrosis #Grateful www,ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com and  https://avascularnecrosiseducation.com

 

My WEGOHealth Profile Link    Deborah Andio WEGOHealth Profile Link

Voting will begin in July and link will be posted then to vote.

Until then if you wish to nominate me or read about WEGOHealth or take the time to nominate other amazing hardworking Advocates please go to link below

WEGOHealthAwards Vote – Review Nominees – How It Works -The Judges

 

My Nominations

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Posted in Advocate, Arthritis, Awareness, Meditation, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain

How I Use Meditation and Palming To Help My Pain

So I have been meditating for over 18 months. It has helped me learn to quiet my mind. Focus on my breathing and start taking back some control of my pain.

It sure did pay off last week.

I fell after another bowman lost her balance her cane went sliding and she also grabbed onto me as for me to stop her fall.

That did not happen.

As with any time I am feeling pain I try to meditate the pain away.

Sometimes it works fantastically sometimes it just calms me which is also good.

Here are the steps I take to help meditate my pain away

Step 1: Stabilize your mind

Step 2: Identify the area where you feel pain.

Step 3: Focus your mind to the pain sensation in the area.

Step 4: Notice if the pain sensation changes.

Step 5: If your mind wanders, gently bring your mind back to the object of your meditation, which is a focused awareness on pain.

Mind stabilization can be achieved with mindfulness meditation, described as “a simple mental exercise, which develops mindfulness and concentration by paying attention on a chosen object (for example, taste of food or activity you wish to focus on) and holding the attention for a period of time. Mindfulness meditation does not necessarily require sitting but can be practiced while eating, walking, running, commuting, and doing other activities. This mental exercise also helps develop an ability to sustain mindfulness for prolonged time.”

Here are helpful tips for quieting an unquiet mind:

  • Meditate for only two minutes (gradually move to 3,4,5,15… minutes)
  • Use a timer to remind you of an end of a meditation session.
  • Instead of trying to stop, welcome it whatever arises.
  • If you cannot concentrate on the object of your meditation, pay attention to the thoughts and stories occurring in your mind instead.
  • If you cannot meditate while sitting, meditate while walking,hiking,running,laying down at night, eating etc….

Say to your self

I am

Breathe in I breathe out am – do this a few times then add I am pain free, I am healing, I am well.

When I’m finished doing this for a few minutes at the end I rub my hands together get them warm and gently place the palms of my hands on my eyes. It feels so good. You can then rub your head.

Feeling the energy in your body going to help your pain.

Palming helps the eyes

Palming: Palming, which was originally invented by Tibetan yogis, is done in darkness with the palms cupping the eyes. Palming soothes the optic nerve, which is often irritated. Sit in a darkened room with your elbows leaning on a table. Relax your back and shoulders, rub your hands together vigorously to warm them, then place your palms over your eyes. Don’t press the eye sockets and don’t lean on the cheekbones. Visualize total blackness, the most relaxing color for the brain, and breathe deeply. Let the blackness permeate everything: your eyes, your whole body, the room you sit in, the city, the state, the continent, the planet, the stars, the universe.

You may see all kinds of lights, which is an indication of irritation in the optic nerve. In fact, you may not see total darkness until you have completed several palming sessions. Palm for as long as is comfortable.

Meditation and Palming

I find this not just relaxing but I feel centered , calm , content and I have less pain when I do this 2x a day, for just 10 minutes.

Here are the links I used and still use sometimes

I am – guided meditation by Wayne Dyer https://youtu.be/BoE4QjMiHys

Palming for relaxing and helping eyes

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Bone and Joint Health, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Osteoporosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Joint Pain and Our Government

It’s that damn pain that may creep up slowly on you with a dull, discomfort in one or several of your joints.

Or it might be like a raging inferno it like a thief in the night, to steal your joy or try to…. the pain comes on suddenly without any warning, bringing on that stabbing intensity as sharp as a knife.

The pain might come and go, or it may last hours, days, weeks…. This pain is arthritis, and it’s likely you know someone living with it or you may be living with it yourself.

It is not just a grandparents issue.

I have been living with arthritis for over 20 years, I think I was 35-36 when I was diagnosed with osteoarthritis, only years later to be diagnosed also with osteonecrosis in 2014 and spondylolisthesis for over 5 years. It can really be exhausting from always dealing with some sort of pain.

Arthritis can be crippling. Some people even need a stair-lift just so they can move freely around their house as they are in too much pain to walk up and down the stairs. Some end up in a wheelchair or using a walker.

Did you know that arthritis impacts more than 50 million adults and 300,000 children in the U.S. According to The Arthritis Foundation, the number of people affected by the condition is expected to increase to 65-68 million by 2030.

More research is needed to combat this health crisis, a disease and source of chronic pain for so many people that it is often marginalized by misinformed attitudes, old wise tales, and social stigma.

Our government officials are not helping us either. They are trying to tell doctors what to prescribe and how much and limit them on treating their patients.

I wish the government would stay out of my health and my doctors business.

My doctor went to school many years and I don’t want some politician giving me medical advice when they have no idea what I live with on a daily basis.Nor have they went to school to become a doctor either.

Many like myself cannot take NSAIDs and when you have osteonecrosis,you really don’t want to constantly be using steroids.

I avoid steroids at all costs.

Arthritis includes more than 100 different types of joint disease and related conditions. I have written previously about osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and juvenile arthritis.

In the most basic terms, arthritis is inflammation of the joints that causes swelling, stiffness, reduced range of motion, and pain that can become chronic. It can affect your knees,ankles and toes, back, hip, fingers, wrists, elbows, shoulders, or neck.

Did you know that the heart, eyes, lungs, kidneys and skin can sometimes also be effected?

Arthritis can also affect your muscles, resulting in muscle weakness or fatigue.

The extra weight from obesity can strain your joints if you are not eating well and exercising regularly.

Your bones are like a bridge and like with any other bridge it has a weight limit before it starts to damage the bridge.

So we have to try to keep moving remove excess weight to keep out bridge aka our bones and joints strong and able to support us.

So many people often dismiss arthritis as a condition of older adulthood, but arthritis can strike any age, gender or race, and it is the leading cause of disability in the United States.

Chronic pain sufferers fear they could become casualties in the war on Ohio’s opioid overdose epidemic.

Because it seems like those who suffer in pain real chronic pain are the only ones paying the price.

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What they ( our elected officials ) don’t understand is responsible people are the ones suffering, not the drug addicts who use heroin and get many of their drugs illegally.

In August 2019 Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said that evidence recently made public makes clear that drugmakers were responsible for the deadly opioid crisis and that they had lied about the addictiveness of their painkillers.

I’m sorry but ya know I don’t buy that crap at all.

When will people actually learn to take responsibility for their own poor choices?

There has been people using and abusing drugs for decades, longer….

lThey are looking to get high, that’s a big difference than someone needing a pain pill now and then to function and have joint mobility and the pain managed.

I get so frustrated at our government always telling patients whats good for them.

And telling doctors how to do their job.

I don’t want my car mechanic telling my dentist how to clean my teeth.

And I don’t want my elected officials telling my doctor what to do.

Why not ban alcohol ?

Why not ban cigarettes

That kills a lot more people and well we know how many abuse that.

Probably because they get a tax on that , so that’s ok.

Just like marijuana, years ago you went to prison , now because the state can make a buck its ok as long as its medical.

According to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey, in 2013, more than half of the US adult population drank alcohol in the past 30 days. About 17% of the adult population reported binge drinking, and 6% reported heavy drinking.

According to the ARDI application, during 2006–2010, excessive alcohol use was responsible for an annual average of  88,000 deaths, including 1 in 10 deaths among working-age adults aged 20 to 64 years, and 2.5 million years of potential life lost.  More than half of these deaths and three-quarters of the years of potential life lost were due to binge drinking.  https://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/data-stats.htm

 

The Republican Governor of Ohio urged the companies to move quickly to settle pending lawsuits seeking to hold them accountable for the epidemic in light of troves of new documents made public because of those suits. And who gets the money from these lawsuits? Certainly not the people that were or are addicted , or their families……no it’s the state.

 

Get stricter on drunk driving laws https://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/impaired_driving/states-data-tables.html

 

But for gosh sakes stop punishing people responsible people who just are trying to live dealing with their chronic pain. To function, to get to work, to grocery shop to live.

Please get involved write or call your elected officials : tell them help those living with chronic pain not make them suffer.

They are not drug addicts they are people like you and me and your neighbor and like your grandparent, mother, uncle son or daughter suffering with chronic pain.

https://www.usa.gov/elected-officials

 

 

The most 5 common types of arthritis are Osteoarthritis, Fibromyalgia, Gout, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than a third of adults who have arthritis report it limits their leisure and work activities. 25% of them state it also causes severe pain (7+ on the 0 to 10 point pain scale).

Children and teens get a type of arthritis called juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). “Juvenile” means young (16 yrs of age or younger) and “idiopathic” means the cause is not known. JIA is also sometimes called juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA).

Many people confuse osteoporosis and different types of arthritis.

  • Arthritis: A general term for conditions that affect the joints and surrounding tissues. Joints are places in the body where bones come together, such as the knees, wrists, fingers, toes, and hips. The two most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Osteoporosis: A condition in which the bones become less dense and more likely to fracture. In osteoporosis, there is a loss of bone tissue that leaves bones less dense and more likely to fracture. It can result in a loss of height, severe back pain, and change in posture. Osteoporosis can impair a person’s ability to walk and can cause prolonged or permanent disability – Difference Between Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

References

Arthritis Foundation

AF types of arthritis

Posted in Awareness, Bone and Joint Health, Bone Health, osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis

Our joints take a lot of abuse over the years.

I’ve had OA in knees and a few other places since I was 38 and I was in shape. But over the years  the pain increased more and more and I gained weight so the wear and tear was even greater. The pain was intense plus I also have other bones and joint issues.

OA is a common form of arthritis.

That’s one reason up to half of Americans over 65 have osteoarthritis, and 10 million under age 50 deal with OA . OA develops when the protective cartilage on the ends of bones wears down. This causes pain and stiffness in areas such as the knees, hips and hands, which can make walking, climbing stairs, brushing your teeth and even grasping a doorknob or pen challenging.

Because osteoarthritis has no cure, easing pain is key. But many older adults have difficulty tolerating pain relievers long-term. Fortunately, nondrug treatments work well for many people, with virtually no side effects.

Manage your weight

If you’re overweight, shedding a few pounds (say, five to 10) can help with pain and function. More is better: In a 2018 study in Arthritis Care & Research, people who lost 10 percent of their body weight saw knee pain drop up to 50 percent.

What you eat may also make a difference, says Dominic King, an orthopedic surgeon at the Cleveland Clinic. A diet rich in fatty fish, healthy fats, fruits, green leafy veggies and nuts may help relieve some of the inflammation associated with arthritis.

Stay active

Exercise may seem like it would cause more pain, but research suggests other­wise.

A 2015 review of 54 studies found that an exercise program was as effective at easing pain and improving function in knee osteoarthritis as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

The U.S. government advises 150 weekly minutes of moderate activity (walking, cycling, swimming), plus muscle-strengthening twice a week. Tai chi or gentle yoga may help. Even chair yoga was found effective in a 2017 study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

How to start? “If someone’s never really exercised before, talk to your doctor to make sure you are able.

“If you can strengthen the muscles around an arthritic joint through exercise and physical therapy, you can take a load off of that joint,” says NYU orthopedic specialist Claudette Lajam, a spokeswoman for the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

Use meds with care

For severe pain, your doctor may suggest an over-the-counter (OTC) pain reliever, at least to help you get through physical therapy. The NSAID naproxen (Aleve and generic) was ranked most effective for knee osteoarthritis.

But NSAIDs can cause gastrointestinal problems, including bleeding.

 

In general patients can’t tolerate being on an NSAID for more than two or three weeks before it begins to affect their stomach, if you need longer term pain relief, talk to you doctor.

And if you have had gastric surgery like Bypass , sleeve, balloon, lap band you most likely were told you cannot take NSAIDS

Be cautious with injections

Although steroid injections can temporarily ease inflammation and pain, they may damage the joint and cartilage you can end up with osteonecrosis,

Injections of hyaluronic acid into the knee joint are thought to act like a lubricant. But a 2018 study in JAAOS found they weren’t helpful.

In injections of platelet-rich plasma, platelets are extracted from your blood and reinjected into an affected joint. A 2016 review of six studies in the journal Arthroscopy found that people reported significant pain relief up to 12 months after injection, compared with those given hyaluronic acid. But this experimental treatment can be costly and typically isn’t covered by insurance.

See surgery as a last resort

I had excellent results with PRP platelet rich plasma injections had 2 injections in a year and pain was cut in half and mobility increased as well and I also have osteonecrosis in my knee as well. So talk to your doctor.

Some orthopedic surgeons recommend arthroscopy — where a tiny camera inserted into your knee allows a doctor to repair cartilage tears and remove cartilage fragments — but research shows that it’s no better than exercise therapy. As a result, an international panel of experts recommended against it in 2017.

REMEMBER Always talk to your own doctor before starting anything new.

DISCLAIMER This info page and blog is not intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment.  The information provided on this website is intended for general consumer understanding and entertainment only.  The information provided is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice.  As health and nutrition research continuously evolves, we do not guarantee the accuracy, completeness, or timeliness of any information presented on this website.

 

knees

Royalty-free stock photo ID: 335557835
Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis

What your eating maybe worsening your Osteoarthritis

Your eating what?

Before you take one more bite of that fast food lunch or dinner consider how it affects your osteoarthritis.

Did you know that research shows that diets high in saturated fat – found in red meat, butter, cheese, lard and processed foods – can weaken knee cartilage, making it more prone to damage.

Yep so start eating more plants

There was a study in 2017 published in Arthritis Care & Research, researchers followed more than 2,000 patients with OA for up to four years, checking disease progression  and diet at yearly intervals. Participants who ate the most fat, especially the saturated kind, showed increasing joint damage, whereas those who ate healthy fats like olive oil and avocados had little disease progression.

Another recent animal study showed that it even may harm the underlying bone, according to Yin Xiao, PhD, a professor at Queensland University of Technology in Australia and lead author of a 2017 study that looked at the effect of diet on OA.

“Our findings suggest that it’s not wear and tear but diet that has a lot to do with the onset of osteoarthritis,” he says.

Blame It On Inflammation

Fat’s not the only culprit, though. Sugar, refined carbs, red meat, processed food and corn and soybean oils can spark inflammation, too. Barry Sears, PhD, a long-time researcher in inflammatory nutrition, says eating them is “like throwing a match into a vat of gasoline.”

These foods also tend to pack on pounds, putting extra pressure on stressed joints. To make matters worse, body fat, especially the kind that collects around your belly, makes its own inflammatory proteins, perpetuating the cycle of inflammation even after you’ve sworn off junk food forever.

Fighting Back

The solution is to change the way you eat. Switching to an anti-inflammatory or Mediterranean-style diet can help you lose weight and significantly improve your joint, heart and  brain health without sacrificing good taste.

An anti-inflammatory diet is heavy on fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and healthy fats like olive oil, avocados and nuts. Poultry’s allowed  now and then and you can have one glass of red wine or beer a day. Off the menu, as you might expect, are sugar, red meat, and processed foods.

What sets this way of eating apart is that it actively fights inflammation, experts say.

“There are a variety of foods in the Mediterranean diet that are high in fiber, beta carotene, magnesium and omega 3s, all of which have been found to reduce inflammatory markers in human studies,” explains Michelle Babb, MS, RD, a Seattle-based nutrition educator.

“I’ve had [arthritis] patients who have been able to discontinue the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a result of transitioning to a Mediterranean diet. Some even report a noticeable difference in pain in the first week.”

Even so, changing the way you eat can be daunting.

“Don’t expect your diet to change overnight,” advises Sotiria Everett, EdD, RD, an assistant professor at Stonybrook University Medical Center in New York. “Start by looking at what you’re eating now (a food diary is a great way to do this) and identifying areas where you can improve.”

But Babb doesn’t see a problem. Her patients “really enjoy this food plan and don’t feel it’s a hardship to follow it,” she says.

She admits it takes more work and advance planning than the drive-through and recommends prepping some food for the week in advance.

I personally can agree with this as when I stopped eating so much red meat and cut out sugar and most processed junk I felt much better .

And when I eat things that are not as healthy as they should be I feel more pain.

So try a plant based diet or as they suggest Mediterranean

You will be so glad you did.

This taken from article Arthritis Foundation Blog

Posted in Awareness, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis, Pain

Osteoarthritis Facts

 

I have had OA for over 15 years and its painful. Its limiting and when you have it in your 40s it really sucks. Fast forward I am 56 and I am still learning how to cope with my pain associated with OA .

Writing about living with osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis as well as a bilateral pars fracture and spondylolisthesisin my L5 S1 has allowed me to meet great people, share my experiences with others, and better understand how people are dealing with similar issues. And hopefully help others like me.

We must not always sit sit means stiff and stiff means more pain.

Pain is the arguably the most distressing feature of osteoarthritis or any bone problem , affecting a patients quality of life and ability to carry out daily routines. Why osteoarthritis is sometimes painful and others painless is yet to be explained.

Today there are over 50 million adults in the United States have some type of arthritis. Although there are more than 100 different types of arthritis, when most people talk about arthritis many are referring to the most common type: osteoarthritis. More common in women, osteoarthritis causes chronic (long-term) symptoms and tends to occur more often as you age.

You are more at risk for osteoarthritis if you:

Are overweight

Have a family history of arthritis

Have had a previous joint injury

How to Manage Joint Pain as You Age

If you have osteoarthritis, your symptoms may come and go and they may become worse over time. Osteoarthritis symptoms can become so severe that you are unable to do certain things you could previously, such as write or walk up and down stairs. The most common symptoms of osteoarthritis include:

Pain and stiffness

Swelling near the joints

Trouble moving around without pain

Decreased range of motion

You can help prevent or delay osteoarthritis symptoms by doing the following:

Regularly exercising

Doing muscle strengthening activities

Avoiding repetitive movements that wear on joints

Maintaining a healthy weight

Living with Osteoarthritis

If you have mild or early symptoms of osteoarthritis, you can help manage your pain using these tips:

We have to keep moving — mild exercise, such as walking, at least once a day

Rest after activity

Alternate hot and cold on the affected joints

Massage therapy

Take over the counter anti-inflammatory pain relief if your allowed to- so check with your doctor

Most mild or moderate arthritis can be treated with a combination of anti-inflammatory medicine and hot/cold therapy or pain relieving creams, rubs or sprays. Some people find that acupuncture can also relieve arthritis symptoms.

When arthritis pain becomes severe, your doctor may recommend mild narcotic medicines with codeine or hydrocodone for pain.

Some patients also find temporary joint pain relief with corticosteroid injections. But use caution because this can cause an even bigger bone problem and that is Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis.

PRP and Prolotherapy as well as Injections like Euflexxa can help Oa and often can also ease some of the pain from osteonecrosis as well.

When medical treatment no longer provides relief, joint replacement surgery may be an option.

Did You know

The new study followed two groups of men and women who had knee osteoarthritis or were at risk for it. Among the first group, those who ate the most fiber were 30% less likely to develop knee pain or stiffness than those who ate the least fiber. More than 4,700 people with knee osteoarthritis were followed for 4 years.

The second group, which followed 1,200 for 9 years, had an even more dramatic result: top fiber consumers had a 60% lower risk for knee symptoms than those who consumed the least fiber.1

Researchers think that fiber’s benefits for those with arthritis stem from two factors:

  1. Fiber creates a feeling a fullness, which can help you eat less and manage weight better. Being overweight is a known risk factor for knee osteoarthritis.

See Knee Osteoarthritis Causes

  1. Fiber can decrease inflammation. Studies have found that fiber intake is inversely associated with levels in the body of C-reactive protein, an inflammatory marker.

Here are some great ways to add more fiber to your diet:

Add kidney or garbanzo beans or lentils to soups and salads

Instead of drinking juice, eat an orange or apple.

Keep raw, cut-up vegetables on hand for snacking. Dip them in yogurt or hummus and enjoy.

Keep fiber-rich snack options on hand, like unsalted nuts or dried fruit.

With a few small changes to your eating habits, you can help protect your knees, your heart, and more by getting fiber in your diet.

 

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Education

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting millions of people worldwide. It occurs when the protective cartilage on the ends of your bones wears down over time.

Although osteoarthritis can damage any joint in your body, the disorder most commonly affects joints in your hands, knees, hips and spine.

Osteoarthritis symptoms can usually be effectively managed, although the underlying process cannot be reversed. Staying active, maintaining a healthy weight and other treatments may slow progression of the disease and help improve pain and joint function.

Symptoms

Osteoarthritis symptoms often develop slowly and worsen over time. Signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis include:

  • Pain. Your joint may hurt during or after movement.
  • Tenderness. Your joint may feel tender when you apply light pressure to it.
  • Stiffness. Joint stiffness may be most noticeable when you wake up in the morning or after a period of inactivity.
  • Loss of flexibility. You may not be able to move your joint through its full range of motion.
  • Grating sensation. You may hear or feel a grating sensation when you use the joint.
  • Bone spurs. These extra bits of bone, which feel like hard lumps, may form around the affected joint.

When to see a doctor

If you have joint pain or stiffness that doesn’t go away, make an appointment with your doctor.

Causes

Osteoarthritis occurs when the cartilage that cushions the ends of bones in your joints gradually deteriorates. Cartilage is a firm, slippery tissue that permits nearly frictionless joint motion.

In osteoarthritis, the slick surface of the cartilage becomes rough. Eventually, if the cartilage wears down completely, you may be left with bone rubbing on bone.

Risk factors

Factors that may increase your risk of osteoarthritis include:

  • Older age. The risk of osteoarthritis increases with age.
  • Sex. Women are more likely to develop osteoarthritis, though it isn’t clear why.
  • Obesity. Carrying extra body weight contributes to osteoarthritis in several ways, and the more you weigh, the greater your risk. Increased weight puts added stress on weight-bearing joints, such as your hips and knees. In addition, fat tissue produces proteins that may cause harmful inflammation in and around your joints.
  • Joint injuries. Injuries, such as those that occur when playing sports or from an accident, may increase the risk of osteoarthritis. Even injuries that occurred many years ago and seemingly healed can increase your risk of osteoarthritis.
  • Certain occupations. If your job includes tasks that place repetitive stress on a particular joint, that joint may eventually develop osteoarthritis.
  • Genetics. Some people inherit a tendency to develop osteoarthritis.
  • Bone deformities. Some people are born with malformed joints or defective cartilage, which can increase the risk of osteoarthritis.

Complications

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease that worsens over time. Joint pain and stiffness may become severe enough to make daily tasks difficult.

Some people are no longer able to work. When joint pain is this severe, doctors may suggest joint replacement surgery.

Imaging tests

Pictures of the affected joint can be obtained during imaging tests. Examples include:

X-rays. Cartilage doesn’t show up on X-ray images, but cartilage loss is revealed by a narrowing of the space between the bones in your joint. An X-ray may also show bone spurs around a joint. Some people may have X-ray evidence of osteoarthritis before they experience any symptoms.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An MRI uses radio waves and a strong magnetic field to produce detailed images of bone and soft tissues, including cartilage. An MRI isn’t commonly needed to diagnose osteoarthritis but may help provide more information in complex cases.

Lab tests

Analyzing your blood or joint fluid can help confirm the diagnosis.

Blood tests. Although there is no blood test for osteoarthritis, certain tests may help rule out other causes of joint pain, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

Joint fluid analysis. Your doctor may use a needle to draw fluid out of the affected joint. Examining and testing the fluid from your joint can determine if there’s inflammation and if your pain is caused by gout or an infection.

 

Medications

Osteoarthritis symptoms, primarily pain, may be helped by certain medications, including:

  • Acetaminophen. Acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) has been shown to be effective for people with osteoarthritis who have mild to moderate pain. Taking more than the recommended dosage of acetaminophen can cause liver damage.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Over-the-counter NSAIDs, including ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and naproxen sodium (Aleve, others), taken at the recommended doses, typically relieve osteoarthritis pain. Stronger NSAIDs, available by prescription, may also slightly reduce inflammation along with relieving pain.

    NSAIDs can cause stomach upset, cardiovascular problems, bleeding problems, and liver and kidney damage. Topical NSAIDs have fewer side effects and may relieve pain just as well.

  • Duloxetine (Cymbalta). Normally used as an antidepressant, this medication is also approved to treat chronic pain, including osteoarthritis pain.

Therapy

  • Physical therapy. A physical therapist can work with you to create an individualized exercise program that will strengthen the muscles around your joint, increase your range of motion and reduce pain. Regular gentle exercise that you do on your own, such as swimming or walking, can be equally effective.
  • Occupational therapy. An occupational therapist can help you discover ways to do everyday tasks or do your job without putting extra stress on your already painful joint. For instance, a toothbrush with a large grip could make brushing your teeth easier if you have finger osteoarthritis. A bench in your shower could help relieve the pain of standing if you have knee osteoarthritis.
  • Tai chi and yoga. These movement therapies involve gentle exercises and stretches combined with deep breathing. Many people use these therapies to reduce stress in their lives, and research suggests that tai chi and yoga may reduce osteoarthritis pain and improve movement. When led by a knowledgeable instructor, these therapies are safe. Avoid moves that cause pain in your joints.

Surgical and other procedures

If conservative treatments don’t help, you may want to consider procedures such as:

  • Cortisone injections. Injections of corticosteroid medications may relieve pain in your joint. During this procedure your doctor numbs the area around your joint, then places a needle into the space within your joint and injects medication. The number of cortisone injections you can receive each year is generally limited to three or four injections, because the medication can worsen joint damage over time.Use Caution as these can cause Osteonecrosis
  • Lubrication injections. Injections of hyaluronic acid may offer pain relief by providing some cushioning in your knee, though some research suggests these injections offer no more relief than a placebo. Hyaluronic acid is similar to a component normally found in your joint fluid.
  • Realigning bones. If osteoarthritis has damaged one side of your knee more than the other, an osteotomy might be helpful. In a knee osteotomy, a surgeon cuts across the bone either above or below the knee, and then removes or adds a wedge of bone. This shifts your body weight away from the worn-out part of your knee.
  • Joint replacement. In joint replacement surgery (arthroplasty), your surgeon removes your damaged joint surfaces and replaces them with plastic and metal parts. Surgical risks include infections and blood clots. Artificial joints can wear out or come loose and may need to eventually be replaced.
  • PRP Injections is a concentration of platelet cells taken from your blood, and these platelets have growth factors that may help in the healing process of chronic injuries. Growth factors are chemicals that signal the body to initiate a healing response.

Lifestyle and home remedies

Lifestyle changes can make a significant difference in osteoarthritis symptoms. Other home treatments also might help. Some things to try include:

  • Exercise. Exercise can increase your endurance and strengthen the muscles around your joint, making your joint more stable. Try walking, biking or swimming. If you feel new joint pain, stop.

    New pain that lasts for hours after you exercise probably means you’ve overdone it but doesn’t mean you have done any significant damage or that you should stop exercising. Simply resume a day or two later at a slightly lower level of intensity.

  • Lose weight. Obesity or even being somewhat overweight increases the stress on your weight-bearing joints, such as your knees and your hips. Even a small amount of weight loss can relieve some pressure and reduce your pain.

    Talk to a dietitian about healthy ways to lose weight. Most people combine changes in their diets with increased exercise.

  • Use heat and cold to manage pain. Both heat and cold can relieve pain in your joint. Heat also relieves stiffness, and cold can relieve muscle spasms and pain.
  • Capsaicin. Topical capsaicin — an active component in hot chili peppers — applied over an arthrititic joint may be an alternative for people who can’t take NSAIDs. It may not be noticeably helpful unless consistently applied three to four times a day for several weeks. Be sure to wash your hands well after applying capsaicin cream.
  • Apply over-the-counter pain creams. Creams and gels available at drugstores may provide temporary relief from osteoarthritis pain. Some creams numb the pain by creating a hot or cool sensation.

    Other creams contain medications, such as aspirin-like compounds, that are absorbed into your skin. Pain creams work best on joints that are close to the surface of your skin, such as your knees and fingers.

  • Braces or shoe inserts. Your doctor may recommend shoe inserts or other devices that can help reduce pain when you stand or walk. These devices can immobilize or support your joint to help take pressure off it.
  • Knee taping. Strapping tape may help ease the pain of knee osteoarthritis. Ask a doctor or physical therapist to demonstrate how best to place the tape.
  • Use assistive devices. Assistive devices can make it easier to go about your day without stressing your painful joint. A cane may take weight off your knee or hip as you walk. Carry the cane in the hand opposite the leg that hurts.

    Gripping and grabbing tools may make it easier to work in the kitchen if you have osteoarthritis in your fingers. Your doctor or occupational therapist may have ideas about what sorts of assistive devices may be helpful to you. Catalogs and medical supply stores also may be places to look for ideas.

Alternative medicine

Various complementary and alternative medicine may help with osteoarthritis symptoms. Treatments that have shown promise for osteoarthritis include:

  • Acupuncture. Some studies indicate that acupuncture can relieve pain and improve function in people who have knee osteoarthritis. During acupuncture, hair-thin needles are inserted into your skin at precise spots on your body.
  • Glucosamine and chondroitin. Studies have been mixed on these nutritional supplements. A few have found benefits for people with osteoarthritis, while most indicate that these supplements work no better than a placebo.Don’t use glucosamine if you’re allergic to shellfish. Glucosamine and chondroitin may interact with blood thinners such as warfarin and cause bleeding problems.
  • Avocado-soybean unsaponifiables. This nutritional supplement — a mixture of avocado and soybean oils — is widely used in Europe to treat knee and hip osteoarthritis. It acts as an anti-inflammatory, and some studies have shown it may slow down or even prevent joint damage.

 

Homemade Pain Rub

Pain Rub

Ingredients

½ cup carrier oil of choice (sweet almond, grapeseed, olive, etc.)

2 T. beeswax pellets (available here)

20 drops Lavender essential oil

10 drops Frankincense essential oil

10 drops Marjoram essential oil

10 drops Rosemary essential oil

Materials

Metal spoon

Large, heat safe glass bowl

Pot

Metal tin (such as these) or glass jar

Instructions

Pour the carrier oil and place the beeswax into the glass bowl.

Fill the pot halfway with water, and put it on the stove with medium high heat. Perch the glass bowl on top of the pot to create a double boiler effect. Once the water begins to boil, turn it down to medium low. You want the water to remain at a low boil, without getting all over the stove.

Stir the mixture with the metal spoon until the beeswax is melted.

Carefully remove the glass bowl from the heat and place it on a table top. Allow the mixture to cool for a few minutes, then stir in the essential oils. If the oil is too hot, the essential oils will just evaporate into the air.

Pour the muscle rub into metal tins, or the glass jar and let it cool to room temperature. You can also put the muscle rub in the fridge to speed up the process.

Do Not use on Broken skin

 

 

 

References and Pics

OA info and PRP

 

Mayo Clinic OA

Posted in Arthritis, Bone Health, osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Facts About Arthritis

View or download the Arthritis Foundation’s “Arthritis by the Numbers” book

Arthritis Disability

Arthritis is the leading cause of disability among adults in the U.S.

Arthritis Prevalence

  • By conservative estimates, about 54 million adults have doctor-diagnosed arthritis.
  • Almost 300,000 babies and children have arthritis or a rheumatic condition.
  • The most common type of arthritis is osteoarthritis, which affects an estimated 31 million Americans.
  • Number of people expected to have doctor-diagnosed arthritis by the year 2040: more than 78 million.

Who Gets Arthritis

Doctor-diagnosed arthritis is more common in women (26 percent) than in men (18 percent). In some types, such as rheumatoid arthritis, women far outnumber men.

Economic Cost of Arthritis

Almost two-thirds of adults in the U.S. with arthritis are of working age (18-64 years).

Arthritis and other non-traumatic joint disorders are among the five most costly conditions among adults 18 and older.

Co-morbidities

Arthritis is much more common among people who have other chronic conditions.

  • 49 percent of adults with heart disease have arthritis.
  • 47 percent of adults with diabetes have arthritis.
  • 31 percent of adults who are obese have arthritis

arthritis

I am a proud New Patient Leader and representative for the Arthritis Foundation.

I will be raising awareness and setting up local meetings in my hometown so we can have a voice and spread awareness locally

Posted in Arthritis, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis, Pain, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Understanding The Mechanisms of Pain

It’s safe to say most of us are not really fans of pain. However it is one of the body’s most important ways for communication. Imagine, for instance, what would happen if you felt nothing when you put your hand in hot water, or burned your neck with a curling iron , or hit your thumb with a hammer and never felt that pain signal.

Pain is one way the body tells you something’s wrong and needs attention.

But pain whether it comes from a burn, a broken bone, surgery, joint replacement or a long-term illness is also an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience.

It has multiple causes, and people respond to it in multiple and individual ways. The pain that you push your way through might be incapacitating to someone else. Pain can make us mentally exhausted and sad if we experience it for to long.

Acute Pain and Chronic Pain

There are several ways to categorize pain. One is to separate it into acute pain and chronic pain.

Acute pain typically comes on suddenly and has a limited duration. It’s frequently caused by damage to tissue such as bone, skin, muscle, or organs, and the onset is often accompanied by anxiety or emotional distress.

Chronic pain lasts longer than acute pain and is generally somewhat resistant to medical treatment. It’s usually associated with a long-term illness, such as osteoarthritis. In some cases, such as with fibromyalgia, it’s one of the defining characteristic of the disease. Chronic pain can be the result of damaged tissue, but very often is attributable to nerve damage.

Just as there are different types of arthritis, there are also different types of pain. The pain you experience can come from various areas of the musculoskeletal system and involve different types of information processing. To learn more about the basics of the nervous system and pain.

Nociceptive Pain

What a odd word I never heard of this word until I was doing research on pain.

This is the normal mechanism that the body uses to process pain day to day. Nociceptive pain occurs when tiny nerves (nociceptors) that run on the surface of organs, muscles, joints and throughout the body are stimulated. These messages are carried by nerves to the brain. For example, when you bang your elbow, you feel nociceptive pain.

Mechanical Pain. Nociceptive pain that happens with stretch or pressure in and around joints is called mechanical pain. Osteoarthritis, low back disorders and tendinitis are common examples of mechanical pain.

Inflammatory Pain. Inflammation is an essential process that helps the body respond to and heal an injury. But it also activates nerves and causes pain. When joints are inflamed, damage to bone, muscles and cartilage (the slick surface between bones of the joints) can occur. Examples of inflammatory arthritis are rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, lupus, gout and ankylosing spondylitis.

Neuropathic pain happens when there’s too much or persistent pressure on nerves or they are damaged. It’s often described as burning, tingling, shooting, stinging or as “pins and needles.” Some people may describe a stabbing, piercing, cutting or drilling pain. An example of this type of pain is sciatic pain due to irritation of the sciatic nerve by a disc or bone spur. The pain starts at an area of the spine in the lower back and can run across the hip and buttock and down the leg.

 

Centralized pain was first used to describe pain that happens when the central nervous system (brain, brainstem, spinal cord) is damaged. It now is used to describe any pain that happens when the central nervous system doesn’t work properly and amplifies or increases the volume of pain. Other terms used to describe this condition include “central sensitization,” “central amplification” and “central pain syndrome.” Several common conditions, such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and temporomandibular joint disorder are examples. Arthritis joint pain can also become centralized in some people, especially if it is long-lasting.

Psychogenic pain is an older term for what happens when emotions cause pain in the body, make existing pain worse or make it last longer. As doctors learn more about how the central nervous system works, fewer types of pain are put in this category. For example, fibromyalgia was once considered psychogenic, but new discoveries have shown problems with pain processing in fibromyalgia. Headache, muscle pain and low back pain are commonly influenced by your emotions.

Wishing you a pain free day

Deb

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, High Heel Shoes, Inflammation, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain

High Heels When You Have Bone Problems

Not the best idea I had, but let’s be real I’m 5’3 and I needed to wear heels 👠 or my pants would be dragging all over the floor.

Also I can fudge my way through hemming pants but I’d do much better if I owned a sewing machine.

But I since I wore these darn shoes I jacked up my knees the good one and the not so good one.

I am ready to throw them out that’s how bad my knees hurt.

So I am a mess this week.

I mean I cannot believe the pain and discomfort I feel.

So I did some research and did you know high heels are terrible on on body , not just the feet !

The entire body.

High heel lovers it’s time to confirm what you may have long suspected: heels aren’t great for your health.

This revelation may not really be that surprising considering high heels essentially force you to teeter around on your tip-toes all day, but what may come as a shock is exactly how much damage they are capable of doing.

Put it this way, it’s not just your feet that suffer.

Feet

Let’s start at the bottom and work our way up. What do high heels do to your feet? Short answer: nothing good.

“There’s some good evidence that when ladies walk in a high heel shoe, there is increased pressure on the front part of the foot,” Associate Professor Lloyd Reed from the QUT School of Clinical Sciences in podiatry told The Huffington Post Australia. “Particularly under the big toe joint, the first metatarsal.

“A lot of weight gets shifted over to the front there, and there is less pressure out near the little toe.

“The types of problems that we see [as a result of this] is something like a bunion on the big toe joint, or hallux valgus.

“Other problems can include corns and calluses on the feet, especially under the ball of the foot and then on the tops of the toes.

The pain under the ball of the foot is called metatarsalgia.

There is also something called Plantar fasciitis which some people would refer to as ‘heel spur syndrome’ which is pain directly under the heel.”

So reconsider your high heel addiction, take into account what Reed refers to as Haglund’s Deformity (mmmm. Sexy).

“That’s a bump on the back of the heel which can be quite painful when ladies are wearing their dress heels or court shoes,” Reed said. “It may be associated with using high heels for prolonged period.”

Not that pain is going to stop women from wearing heels any time soon. As Reed points out, one American study found 42 percent of women wore high heels in spite of pain for aesthetic reasons.

“There’s even some evidence to suggest women more likely to have inappropriately fitting shoes than blokes, even into older age,” Reed said. “And of course, people who have the worst fit in shoes are more likely to have problems with calluses and bunions and so on.

“Some of that also has to do with the style of high heel. For instance I know the fit of the shoe often has a tapered toe and narrow upper section, and that in itself can be a problem for the feet.”

Knees

“What happens when you wear high heels is that your heel is raised off the ground, which in turn makes your body start to push forward,” Associate Professor Kevin Netto and Director of Research at the School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science at Curtin University told The Huffington Post Australia.

“So you set up what is known as sheer force in your knee. Basically, the front part of your body is trying to fall forward and you are trying to pull it backwards by keeping yourself upright. It’s a constant battle.

“That’s why most people who wear really high heels will find their knees hurt rather than their ankles. Basically because of the sheer force you set up in your knee.”

Knee osteoarthritis is much more common in females than males in all ages. In fact the prevalence is about 30 percent higher in females.

In terms of the actual damage caused to a regular high heel wearer, Netto has this to say:

“If you cut their knees open, it would be a pretty disgusting mess. Cartilage in your knee helps cushion forces, and if you are wearing heels every day you keep tearing on it and pulling on it and pulling on it. As such, it tends to become quite worn, and that’s not something you can regenerate. It’s not regenerative material.”

Adds Reed: “There is evidence that when person walks [in high heels] they do a couple of things, and one of these is to increase the bending of the knee in order to improve their walking and adjust to the fact their ankle is not going to move as much.

“The consequences of this is it produces much more pressure, or more load, in the inside edge of the knee, in the medial compartment of the knee joint.

“Now, the medial compartment of the knee joint is the most common place for knee arthritis, and it has been shown knee osteoarthritis is much more common in females than males in all ages. In fact the prevalence is about 30 percent higher in females.”

Lower back

“There is a common thinking that when it comes to the back, what’s called the lumbar lordosis or the curve at the lower back will increase with higher heeled shoes,” Reed told HuffPost Australia.

“Scientific research is not conclusive with that. It’s very common on the internet but the scientific research is mixed on that front.

“What there is lots of evidence for is the increase in muscle activity in the lower back. Also there’s some increase in the abdominal muscles and, for some people, there’s an increase in muscle activity in the thoracic region of the spine and the neck.

“So effectively the increase in muscle demand can go right up through the body, from foot to leg to the lower back, to the middle back, up to the neck.”

“I challenge anybody to say they walk normally in really high heels. You don’t need a PhD in bio-mechanics to explain that one. Just look at someone’s gait.

Injuries

Put simply, those who wear high heels are at risk of doing themselves an injury. (Yes, even if you’re super talented at walking in the highest of stilettos, this means you.)

“Wearing high heels effects your centre of mass, which is basically the balance point in the body,” Netto said.

“Everyone has a balance point in their body, and to maintain your balance, you have to keep this little balance point over your base of support, which is your feet, basically. If you lose your balance then your balance point moves outside where it’s supposed to be.

“When you wear heels, you bring the balance point in your body higher, so you become less stable and much more prone to falling etc.

“The higher the heel, the more you are going to raise your centre of mass, and the more unstable you are going to become, which means you have a higher potential of falling.”

For those who are reading this thinking, ‘yeah… but I’m great at walking in heels, so this doesn’t apply to me’, Netto has this to say:

“I challenge anybody to say they walk normally in really high heels. You don’t need a PhD in bio-mechanics to explain that one. Just look at someone’s gait.”

According to Reed, a study over a ten-year period (from 2002-2012) in the United States revealed the rate of injuries suffered by ladies wearing high heels doubled within the decade (though they’re not sure why).

The highest rate of those injured were within the age bracket of 20 – 29, followed closely by 30-39

“The most common injury was a sprain or a strain in the foot or the ankle,” Reed said.

“There was also a similar study done in Victoria, conducted from 2006 – 2010, which looked at the number of injuries presenting to emergency departments which were directly attributed to a high heel shoe.

“All of the people injured were less than 55 years of age, and the most common injury was an ankle injury, which doesn’t really come as a surprise, as when ankle is flexed, it’s more prone to ankle sprains.”

Interestingly, most ladies presented with their injuries on Sunday mornings between 8am and 12pm.

“So perhaps due to a Saturday night injury,” Reed said. “We don’t know this for sure, but that’s what we may infer.”

More injuries were also reported in the summer months.

Recommendations

“Obviously we would recommend people don’t spend a lot of time in high heels,” Reed told HuffPost Australia. “And even if they have to wear a high heel, try and get the shape of the shoe to be slightly rounder or broader toe box to fit the foot. if possible.

“Sometimes we suggest that even if there’s a bit of heel height, a larger width of heel might be advantageous, particularly with the slip risk.”

Netto was more to the point.

“Don’t wear them. It’s pretty bloody simple,” he said. “It’s a bit like smoking, if you don’t want to get lung cancer, don’t smoke. If you don’t want a bad back and bad knees, don’t wear heels.

“Even if you feel you have to wear them, you don’t have to wear stilettos. They just aren’t called for. If you are going to have to wear something, wear something light and stay on your feet as little as possible.

“Look, in terms of recommendations, I’m not going to say very much. I don’t want to be an advocate for them.”

Reference

https://m.huffingtonpost.com.au/2016/08/17/this-is-what-wearing-heels-all-day-does-to-your-body_a_21453115/

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain

Joint Pain

 Congratulations !  If you’re like me you are one of the 30 million adults in the United States who suffer with joint pain, you know the pain often is debilitating. It can keep you from staying active and limits your mobility and it even makes daily chores seem impossible. What you might not know is that many doctors can treat joint pain with more than just pills or surgery. Beware though some doctors will tell you about one procedure and then change it once they know your insurance example Medicare I felt one doctor thought less of me as a patient because I am disabled so he changed or tried to change the procedure. It pissed me off because I was all set to get the procedure we discussed and then he changed it.

Both procedures were covered under Medicare so I felt betrayed as if I wasn’t good enough for the other injection.

Newsflash people ….  on Medicare pay for the insurance hell I pay more than when I was working.

Make sure this doesn’t happen to you.

 

Depending on the severity of your pain, injections can be another option for easing your joint pain and help to get you moving again.

Doctors use these injections to try to reduce inflammation and pain in your joints some come with side effects and some risks.

The injections range from corticosteroids, which have been around for decades, to newer ortho-biologic injections like platelet-rich plasma (PRP) , Stem Cell and placental tissue matrix (PTM)

 

You and your physician will decide which one is best based on your individual needs. The issue is finding doctors qualified to do these.

Not every injection is right for every patient, in my case I hate steroid injections, not only did it make my pain worse it also comes with the risk of developing osteonecrosis. Something I already have. I have noticed that it seems like doctors are quick to prescribe and inject steroids. I stand my ground and refuse. But that’s me.

 

So here are some facts to help you know more about the options.

Corticosteroid injections

 

Use: This injection is the first line of defense against osteoarthritis symptoms and other joint pain in shoulders, knees and hips. Corticosteroids can offer relief for two to three months, and reduce inflammatory cell activity in the joint. In some people.

Side effects and Risks : As with all injections, there’s a small chance of infection about one in 1,000 as well as Joint infection.

Nerve damage.

Thinning of skin and soft tissue around the injection site.

Temporary flare of pain and inflammation in the joint.

Tendon weakening or rupture.

Thinning of nearby bone (osteoporosis)

Osteonecrosis lack of blood supply to the bone

Raised blood sugar level

Whitening or lightening of the skin around the injection site

Cost: Most insurance covers the $100 -$200 usd cost of these injections. Your insurance provider may require that you try at least one corticosteroid injection first to see whether it works. If not, you may move on to a different therapy.

 

Hyaluronic acid injections

Use: Hyaluronic acid (HA) injections often are used when corticosteroid injections don’t work. But they usually are approved only for use in the knee.

In some instances, doctors consider an HA injection first if you don’t have obvious signs of inflammation. HA also is a better option if you have diabetes, as corticosteroids can raise blood sugar levels.

Also known as gel injections, HA injections are chemically similar to your natural joint fluid.

When you have osteoarthritis which is different than osteonecrosis lucky me I have both, the joint fluid becomes watery.

So, this injection helps to restore the fluid’s natural properties and works as a lubricant and a shock absorber.

HA is a cushion or a buffer against inflammatory cells in the joint.  In some cases, it can stimulate the knee to start producing more natural HA.” Some physicians also believe that HA helps reduce pain by coating nerve endings within the joint.

One treatment, which may consist of between one and three injections, usually offers symptom relief for four to five months, but sometimes up to one years. However, pain and stiffness will return. Most insurance companies only approve one HA injection every six months.

In knees with osteoarthritis, the joint fluid (called synovial fluid) can break down and not provide the cushioning your knee needs

Durolane

Euflexxa

Hyalgan

Orthovisc

Monovisc

Supartz

Synvisc, Synvisc-One

Depending on which type your doctor uses, you may get a single shot. Or you’ll get three to five injections spaced a week apart.

 

Side effects: There’s a 1-in-100 chance of an inflammatory reaction, The most common short-term side effects are minor pain at the injection site and minor buildup of joint fluid. These get better within a few days.

 

Cost: HA injections cost more — about $300 to $850 per injection, but most insurance companies cover the cost for knee injections.

 

 

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections

Use: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections can treat osteoarthritis joint pain, and are being thoroughly researched to understand their effects.

These injections use your own blood and platelets to promote healing. Platelets contain growth factors and proteins that aid healing in soft tissues. Research shows PRP injections can alter the immune response to help reduce inflammation,

Side effects: Side effects include a very low risk of infection and pain at the injection site. You must stop oral anti-inflammatory medications for a short amount of time if you get a PRP injection.

Cost: Insurance companies don’t generally cover PRP injections and you will pay between $400 and $1,300 per injection out-of-pocket.

 

Stem Cell Injections

The world’s most advanced regenerative injection treatments for treating knee pain due to arthritis, meniscus tears, traumatic ligament injuries, overuse conditions and other degenerative conditions.

 

Side effects : mild discomfort associated with the procedure. There is a very small risk of infection whenever aspirations and injections are performed. Nerve damage, vessel damage, and injury to other important structures are exceedingly rare

 

 

Placental tissue matrix (PTM) injections

 

Use: Placental Tissue Matrix (PTM) injections can very profoundly decrease the pain related to osteoarthritis.

 

These are injections of placental tissue, which is obtained after a healthy baby is delivered from a healthy mother. Research has discovered that there is a large number of growth factors in placental tissue that promote healing, Dr. Genin says.

Side effects: Side effects include a  low risk of infection and pain at the injection site. The placental tissue is “immune privileged,” which means the body would not have an adverse reaction to it.

Cost: Insurance companies don’t generally cover PTM injections; you will pay around $1,800 -$2500 per injection out-of-pocket.

 

Many of these injections often are effective in reducing or stopping your joint pain, but it’s important to remember that they may not keep the pain from returning, Dr. Schaefer says. In fact, they’re most effective when used with other therapies.

 

As a patient who has Osteonecrosis, Osteoarthritis, and other stuff I consider surgical options as a last resort only if other treatment options have failed. Unfortunately some treatments I cannot even afford to try. I wish the FDA would get a move on and approve some things so insurance companies can have this as a form of treatment.

 

 

 

 

Stem Cells

 

BONE MARROW AND FAT CELLS

The stem cells used in this point of care clinic are Autologous Cells that we take from your own body.  These cells are taken from your own Bone Marrow or Fat Cells.  The cells are your own Stem Cells and will not be rejected by your body.

Taking the Bone Marrow or Fat Cells from your body is relatively painless as a mild local anesthetic is used prior to harvesting.  These cells are processed to receive the most stem cell gain and then injected into the area of your body where you need the growth factors to go to work the quickest.  Your blood is also drawn and your platelet rich plasma is added to the Stem Cells taken from your Bone Marrow or Fat Cells to increase the activity of the growth factors.

It is important that these cells are used the day they are extracted from your body in order to insure they remain alive and active.  Our clinic does not grow extra stem cells from your Bone Marrow or Fat Cells to ensure that they are alive and active.  It is an FDA requirement that you receive your cells the same day they are harvested.

You get only the stem cells we extract from your body and there is no other manipulation used except extraction and preparation of the samples taken from your own body.  The cells are taken in a procedure that creates only mild discomfort or none at all.  Ninety nine percent of our patients experience no pain obtaining bone marrow or fat cells.

 

CORD STEM CELLS:

 

Embryo and Placenta stem cells can create certain types of cancers.  The cord blood Stem Cells should only be used if they are obtained from a healthy relative and you are a good match.  Cord Stem Cells that are used outside of the country or shipped to this country are illegal.  The FDA has found diseases in these grown cells and states that most of them are dead.  Even though the physicians supplying these Cord Cells claim they are safe to use, you should use extreme caution before considering these procedures.

 

ARE YOU A CANDIDATE FOR THESE STEM CELL PROCEDURES

 

REBUILDING JOINTS & SPINE: The Stem Cells that are obtained from your body are placed into all joints and spine to rebuild and regenerate new tissue growth as determined by the clinic physician.   There has been clinical evidence that new cartilage can be grown within your joint provided you are determined a candidate by the clinical physician.  Not all patients will be a candidate and may require joint replacement.

 

TORN TENDONS:  If the patients tendons are not completely torn this procedure will produce new tissue growth to regenerate torn tendons. Our clinic physician can only determine this with an initial visit and evaluation.

 

 

 

How Does PRP Therapy Work?

To prepare PRP, a small amount of blood is taken from the patient. The blood is then placed in a centrifuge. The centrifuge spins and through a multi-functional process separates the plasma from the blood producing the PRP. This increases the concentration of platelets and growth factors up to 500% also increasing hMSC (human stem cells) proliferation as a function of 8-day exposure to platelet released concentrations 10x. (x= increase above native levels)

 

When PRP is injected into the damaged area it stimulates the tendon or ligament causing mild inflammation that triggers the healing cascade. As a result new collagen begins to develop. As this collagen matures it begins to shrink causing the tightening and strengthening of the tendons and ligaments of the damaged area.

 

What is Platelet Rich Plasma?

Platelet Rich Plasma or PRP is blood plasma with concentrated platelets. The concentrated platelets found in PRP include growth factors among the huge reservoirs of bioactive proteins that are vital to initiate and accelerate tissue repair and regeneration. These bioactive proteins increase stem cell production to initiate connective tissue healing, bone regeneration and repair, promote development of new blood vessels and stimulate the wound healing process.

 

PRP Regenerates Tendons & Ligaments

Tendons connect the muscle to the bone making it possible for you to do many everyday physical activities. Overuse or damage to the tendon over a long period of time causes the collagen fibers in the tendons to form small tears, a condition called tendonitis. Damage to tendons most often occurs in the knees, ankles, hips, spine, elbows, shoulders, and wrists.

 

Ligaments are composed of collagen fibers that hold one bone to another, stabilizing the joint and controlling the range of motion. When a ligament is damaged, it is no longer able to support the bones in the joint, which often leads to pain symptoms. The instability causing the pain in your joints does not always show up on high tech imaging equipment. Through a thorough neurological and orthopedic evaluation Dr. Baum can determine which ligaments and tendons are unstable due to injury, wear or tear.

 

Tendons and ligaments have a poor blood supply and they do not usually heal from damage. Combined with the stress of day-to-day activities tendons and ligaments become inefficient causing degeneration of the joint which leads to chronic pain and weakness. Patients who experience chronic pain may not even remember when the injury occurred.

 

How Does PRP Compare With Cortisone Shots?

Studies have shown that cortisone injections may actually weaken tissue. Cortisone shots may provide temporary relief and stop inflammation, but may not provide long term healing. PRP therapy is healing and strengthening these tendons and ligaments and in some cases thickening the tissue up to 40%.

 

Treatment Plan

PRP injections with guided ultrasound can be performed on tendons and ligaments all over the body. Cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine, degenerative disc disease, arthritic joints shoulder pain, hip pain, and knee pain, even the smaller joints of the body can all be treated effectively with PRP. Dr. Baum will determine whether prolo solution, Platelet Rich Plasma or a combination of both will be the most effective form of treatment for you during his initial consult and evaluation.

 

Frequency Of Treatments

While responses to treatment vary, most people will require 3 to 6 sets of injections of PRP. Each set of treatments is spaced 4 to 6 weeks apart.

 

Is PRP Right For Me?

If you have degenerative spine or joint disease, a tendon or ligament injury, laxity or tear and traditional methods have not provided relief then PRP therapy may be the solution. It will heal tissue with minimal or no scarring and alleviates further degeneration and builds new tissues. There will be an initial evaluation with Dr. Baum to see if PRP therapy is right for you.

 

What Can Be Treated?

Platelet Rich Plasma injections helps regenerate all areas of the body including the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine, wrists, elbows, shoulders, hips, knees and ankles as well as tendons and ligaments all over the body.  Dr. Baum is one of the few physicians performing PRP procedures to all areas of the spine.  Our clinic treats patients with sports injuries, arthritic and degenerative joints and degenerative disc disease. More specific injuries including tennis elbow, carpal tunnel syndrome, scoliosis, ACL tears, shin splints, rotator cuff tears, plantar faciitis and iliotibial band syndrome may all be effectively treated with PRP.

 

What Are The Potential Benefits?

Patients can see a significant improvement in symptoms as well as a remarkable return of function. This may eliminate the need for more aggressive treatments such as long-term medication or surgery.

 

Special Instructions

You are restricted from the use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) one week prior to the procedure and throughout the course of treatments.

 

Initially the procedure may cause some localized soreness and discomfort. Most patients only require some extra-strength Tylenol to help with the pain. Ice and heat may be applied to the area as needed.

 

How Soon Can I Go Back Regular Activities?

PRP therapy helps regenerate tendons and ligaments but it is not a quick fix. This therapy is stimulating the growth of new tissue requiring time and rehabilitation. Under Dr. Baum’s supervision patients will begin an exercise program immediately following the first procedure. During the treatment program most people are able to resume normal activities and exercise.

 

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Matrix Graft by David Crane, MD and Peter A.M. Everts PhD

 

PRP application techniques in musculoskeletal medicine utilize the concentrated healing components of a patient’s own blood—reintroduced into a specific site—to regenerate tissue and speed the healing process

 

PRP INJECTION APPLICATION SITES

Spine

Cervical/Thoracic/Lumbar/Sacral

Shoulders & Elbows

Wrist & Hand

Hip/Pelvis

Knee & Lower Leg

Ankle & Foot

Fingers & Toes

Arthritic Joints

Osteoarthritis

Some Osteonecrosis

 

 

 

 

Information

http://www.prolotherapy.com/PPM_JanFeb2008_Crane_PRP.pdf

https://drjamesbaum.com/wp-content/uploads/stemcells2002-0109.pdf

 

 

Important Videos Everyone Should watch on Biologics

https://drjamesbaum.com/2013/07/the-science-of-mesenchymal-stem-cells-and-regenerative-medicine/

 

Scientific Papers on Research of Stem Cells

https://drjamesbaum.com/stem-cells/scientific-papers/

 

 

 

knnz

 

I will be posting this in my other blog section also

Posted in Bone Health, Euflexxa, Knee, osteoarthritis

EUFLEXXA Possibly- My New treatment for my OA in Knee-If you had it I want to know

Having a jacked up knee sucks.

I have Osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Joint effusion, Marrow edema  and Lateral petellar subluxation all in one small knee cap.

I had an MRI the end of May 2018 it showed my osteonecrosis has not progressed and even looks better than it did 2 years ago!! That’s A Win I will take

So I discussed other options with the ortho and I have decided to get Euflexxa injections.

WHAT DOES HYALURONIC ACID (HA) DO INSIDE YOUR KNEE AND WHY DOES IT NEED TO BE REPLACED?

When EUFLEXXA is injected into the knee, it replenishes the HA you have lost, helping provide pain relief. Clinical studies have shown that EUFLEXXA may help provide pain relief for up to 6 months.

HA contains a natural substance that is found in the human body as well as in animals and bacteria. In the human knee, HA is a thick, slippery fluid that helps cushion, lubricate, and protect the bones and joint tissue. In patients with OA of the knee, the HA gets thinner over time and becomes less able to provide protection.

EUFLEXXA is used to relieve OA knee pain in people who do not get enough relief from simple pain medications such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or naproxen or from exercise and physical therapy.

Your treatment with EUFLEXXA

Sometimes osteoarthritis (OA) knee pain gets worse even when you do everything you’re supposed to do to help control your OA. Following all the tips for controlling your OA, such as eating rightmaintaining a healthy weightexercisingstaying active, and taking your over-the-counter (OTC) and/or prescription pain relievers still may not relieve your pain well enough.Only your doctor can tell you what type of treatment is right for you, and only your doctor can prescribe EUFLEXXA. This is why it’s so important to talk with him or her about your OA knee pain and ask whether EUFLEXXA is the right next therapy to help relieve your pain.

EUFLEXXA is a prescription-only therapy that is given by a doctor or other healthcare professional as a course of 3  injections— 1 injection a week for 3 weeks.2CAN EUFLEXXA RELIEVE YOUR OA KNEE PAIN?

EUFLEXXA was studied in several clinical trials to determine how much it helps people like you who are experiencing pain, stiffness, or other symptoms caused by OA of the knee who had not received pain relief from other medications.

RESULTS FROM THE 12-WEEK STUDY  SHOWED2,3,*

  • Comparing patients’ overall knee pain before treatment with overall knee pain after 12 weeks, both EUFLEXXA and another HA provided similar improvement in pain reduction:
    • With EUFLEXXA, overall knee pain improved by an average of 62%
    • With the other HA, overall knee pain improved by an average of 55%

The bar graph shows improvement (reduction in pain score) for each therapy2,3,*:

  • Patients who received EUFLEXXA saw their pain score go from 49.2 before their injections down to 18.7 twelve weeks after the first injection
  • Patients who received another HA saw their pain score go from 51.9 before the injections down to 23.2 twelve weeks after the first injection

The most common adverse events related to EUFLEXXA injections were joint pain, back pain, limb pain, muscle pain, and joint swelling

In the 12-week study, side effects caused by EUFLEXXA were joint pain (11/160), increase in blood pressure (3/160), joint swelling (3/160), feeling of sickness (3/160), tingling (2/160), back pain (1/160), nausea (1/160), skin irritation (1/160), and tenderness in study knee (1/160).

ONLY YOUR DOCTOR CAN TELL YOU WHAT TYPE OF TREATMENT
IS RIGHT FOR YOU, AND ONLY YOUR DOCTOR CAN PRESCRIBE EUFLEXXA.

MORE PATIENTS SAID THEY WERE VERY SATISFIED WITH EUFLEXXA3,* Both EUFLEXXA and the other HA satisfied a similar number of patients at the end of the 12-week study

  • With EUFLEXXA, MORE patients said they were VERY satisfied

THE PRIMARY ENDPOINT FROM THE 26-WEEK STUDY SHOWED EUFLEXXA WAS ABLE TO

  • Help people with knee pain get lasting pain relief for up to 6 months2,4,*EUFLEXXA provided up to 6 months of pain relief for people with OA of the knee and provided noticeably better relief compared with salt water injections2,4,* A CONTINUATION OF THE STUDY SHOWED THAT A REPEAT TREATMENT WITH EUFLEXXA WAS SAFE FOR AN ADDITIONAL 26 WEEKS2,4,5,*,† —With an additional 3-injection course of EUFLEXXA given after 6 months, no patients experienced severe swelling caused by fluid buildup in the joint during the 1 year studied

*Individual results may vary.

All 516 patients who completed the 26-week FLEXX Trial were offered treatment with EUFLEXXA 26 weeks after their first treatment. For those patients who received a series of 3 salt water injections in the FLEXX Trial, this was their first 3-injection treatment with EUFLEXXA. For those who had previously received EUFLEXXA in the FLEXX Trial, this was a repeated series of 3 injections.5WHAT MAKES EUFLEXXA DIFFERENT FROM THE OTHER PAIN RELIEVERS YOU MAY HAVE STARTED WITH?

  • EUFLEXXA is injected into your knee to treat OA knee pain right at the source.It is different from oral medication, which circulates throughout your body
  • EUFLEXXA is made from a natural, nonbird-derived source. This means that EUFLEXXA can be used in people who are allergic to poultry products1EUFLEXXA is not processed with formaldehyde, vinyl sulfone, or cinnamic acid additives1,2,5EUFLEXXA MAY NOT BE AN OPTION FOR YOU IF YOU HAVE1A known allergy to hyaluronate products
  • A knee joint infection
  • An infection or skin disease around the area where EUFLEXXA would be administered

Know how you’re doing and let your doctor know, too

During the time you are receiving therapy with EUFLEXXA and during the months afterward, you should keep track of any improvement or other changes in your pain and stiffness. Take special care to track your progress for activities that matter most to you.

We encourage you to track how you’re doing with your therapy and to track all the things you are doing to get and stay healthy. It is important for you to recognize what works and what doesn’t. This will allow you and your doctor to make informed decisions about your treatment and help you adjust your treatment plan, if necessary. Plus, it will provide motivation for you to stick with your healthy habits by eating rightexercising to build strength, and shedding unhealthy pounds (if weight loss is in your plan).

Another good reason to keep track of how you are doing is that it will help you and your doctor determine whether, after a first course of EUFLEXXA, a re-treatment course of EUFLEXXA will be right for you 6 months later.

What is EUFLEXXA?

EUFLEXXA (1% sodium hyaluronate) is a hyaluronic acid (HA) product that is manufactured through a precise, multistep cleansing and filtering process that creates a highly purified, gel-like HA fluid. Unlike other HAs, EUFLEXXA is not derived from birds and is instead naturally created in a controlled environment. EUFLEXXA is designed for injection into the knee to help replace your knees own HA.1,2WHEN EUFLEXXA IS INJECTED INTO THE KNEE, IT REPLENISHES
THE HA YOU’VE LOST, HELPING PROVIDE PAIN RELIEF.

WHAT DOES HYALURONIC ACID (HA) DO INSIDE YOUR KNEE AND WHY DOES IT NEED TO BE REPLACED?

HA is a natural substance that is found in the human body as well as in animals and bacteria. In the human knee, HA is a thick, slippery fluid that helps cushion, lubricate, and protect the bones and joint tissue. In patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, the HA gets thinner over time and becomes less able to provide protection.3EUFLEXXA is used to relieve OA knee pain in people who do not get enough relief from simple pain medications such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or naproxen or from exercise and physical therapy.2When EUFLEXXA is injected into the knee, it temporarily replenishes the HA you have lost while stimulating the knee to produce its own healthy HA.4,5Clinical studies have shown that EUFLEXXA may help provide pain relief for up to 6 months.1-3,6-8EUFLEXXA is not an oral medication. It is injected directly into the knee
by a doctor or other qualified healthcare professional. It works right at
the source of pain.

HOW IS EUFLEXXA GIVEN, AND WHAT CAN I EXPECT FROM TREATMENT?

EUFLEXXA is injected into the space in your knee joint. Treatment consists of 3 injections— 1 injection per week for 3 weeks.2The approved dosing regimen for EUFLEXXA is 3 injections. Some people experience moderate pain relief after the first or second injection of EUFLEXXA, with most people experiencing significant relief after the third (last) injection. Even if you experience pain relief after your first or second injection of EUFLEXXA, be sure to still get all 3 injections for maximum benefit.2,5HOW LONG DOES EUFLEXXA LAST?

When it comes to the length of pain relief, every person is different. In general, 1 course of EUFLEXXA injections may give you months of pain relief. In clinical studies, EUFLEXXA gave most people relief lasting up to 6 months.2,5,6WHAT IMPORTANT INFORMATION SHOULD I KNOW ABOUT EUFLEXXA?

Do not get an injection of EUFLEXXA if you have had any previous allergic reaction to EUFLEXXA or other hyaluronan products. Do not get a EUFLEXXA injection into the knee if you have a knee joint infection or skin diseases or infections around the injection site.2EUFLEXXA is only for injection into the knee and should be performed by a qualified healthcare professional. Try to avoid activities such as jogging, tennis, heavy lifting, or standing on your feet for a long time (more than 1 hour) for 2 days after receiving an injection.2The safety and effectiveness of EUFLEXXA have not been established in pregnant women.

WHAT SIDE EFFECTS ARE SEEN WITH EUFLEXXA?

In clinical trials, the most common side effects were joint pain, back pain, limb pain, muscle pain, and joint swelling in the knee or at the injection site and stiffness, swelling, or warmth in or around the knee.

 

So in a few weeks I will start to post on each injection I get and the outcome .

I have read good and bad stuff about it ………………….. I am still researching while I wait on my appointment…..

My appointment for injection one is now pending for July 23,2018

:p

Video Euflexxa 

Research and info came from

https://www.euflexxa.com/euflexxafaqs/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIk6Pmmcf52wIVjQOGCh1rew6LEAAYASAAEgLDAPD_BwE

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Chronic Pain, Clinical Trials, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Hashimoto, Hypothyroidism, Life, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, SPONK, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Support Group, Hope, The Mighty, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards, wellness

WEGOHealth Awards and How to Nominate Others

I’m honored to say I’ve been nominated for the #WEGOHealthAwards! These awards seek to recognize Patient Leaders who are making an impact with their advocacy. Learn more – nominate today.

Here’s how you can also nominate others who educate, advocate and make a difference!

Click link below

WEGOHealth Awards and Nomination Info

WEGOHealth Awards Link To Information

Think about the advocates and influencers you see leading Facebook groups, blogging about their health journey, speaking up and giving insights to healthcare companies, presenting on national stages, and running Twitter chats.

Patient Leaders have started non-profits, published podcast episodes, and authored books – there is no shortage of Patient Leaders’ contributions to the world, so let’s recognize as many of them as we can for their talents, contributions, and commitment.

Feel free to add their names and web info also in my comment section! And they can get some recognition here to !

Have a Great Day Everyone

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, SONK, SPONK, Stem Cell, Stem Cell Injections, Thoughts, WegoHealth, wellness

The Cost Of Knee Replacements

If you’re having trouble with your knees, you’re not alone.

I also have knee issues. I have Osteonecrosis and osteoarthritis and a torn meniscus all in the same knee.

And doctors are basically waiting for my knee to collapse to replace it.

Me I’m looking to avoid a collapse but at the 10k out of pocket cost it’s almost impossible. I’m talking stem cell injection.

Many people young and old alike are having many problems with their knees and ready to stop the pain.

Can you believe knee replacements have doubled in the United States from 2004 to 2014!

People want to have relief from their knee pain. The shouldn’t have to pas on a treatment that will work becz it’s not covered, or be stuck to live in pain until the knee collapses, then be forced to pay for a replacement.

One option that often comes up is knee replacement surgery.

However, it’s a very expensive surgery that includes a lot of pain and extensive physical therapy. And come on now let’s not forget they remove the end of the knee and replace it with artificial parts.

So let’s walk you through the true cost of knee replacement surgery so you have an idea of what to expect.

Pre-Surgical Consultation Fees

Individuals having knee replacement surgery can expect to incur costs long before actually being admitted to the hospital.

A pre-surgical evaluation or consultation must be completed by your orthopedic surgeon in order to see if an individual can even have the surgery. I think they do this for every surgery to make sure we are strong enough to handle the surgery and not die in the table.

I had umbilical hernia surgery in 2017 and had a cut scan , then a stress test, blood work. All for a 40 minute hernia repair.

Anyway………

This consultation will involve imaging X-rays and MRI’s ,then there is blood work, cultures, and panels.

Patients can expect their providers to also do the following:

Determine bone mineral density

Issue a liver function test

Do an EKG or EC

Possibly a stress test

Conduct a urine test

The consult determines what type of knee replacement surgery will be required PKR or TKR partial or total knee replacement.

Then the cost of the hospital stay and surgery costs.

Those who gave a knee replacement should expect to be in the hospital for at least 2-6 days.

During this time, the patient will require the help of many healthcare professionals.

The cost of the inpatient stay will largely be dependent upon the following:

Length of time in the operating room

Any preexisting conditions that require extra care

Type of implant

Surgical approach

Complications

Number of days in the hospital

Be prepared while in the hospital you will be paying for everything, every pill, glass of water, meals, physical therapy, nurses all of it

Many knee surgery candidates elect to have surgery overseas due to the large difference in cost. In some countries, knee replacement surgery is 50 to 80 percent cheaper than they are in the United States. But no always covered by insurance and it can be risky.

So say you have an 80/20 plan and your knee replacement is 45,000.00 your 20 percent is 9000.00

Now a stem cell injection is 8-10,000usd. Would it not be more cost effective and save the patient pain , and the actual loss of their own joint to just even cover a stem cell injection if the patient meets the criteria?

Even 60/40 would be a plus.

We have get insurance companies, medicare and Medicare to come into the real world. We have great medical technology it’s time the average person has access to it.

Living a life waiting for your knee to collapse is no fun, it’s poor quality and when there are alternative options that could help if you qualify why are we forced to suffer.!!

Posted in Adrenals, Ahlbacks Disease, Apple, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Hashimoto, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis

Body Confidence

Can you be body confident when suffering from chronic pain? Do these two things even mix? Can I live in harmony again in a body that seems to work against me? I’ve been living with chronic pain for 4 years now. Some days I am in more pain than others .

I had to retire for now from my optometric tech -optician duties because of all the pain I have had and the limited mobility drives me crazy because I don’t like to be limited.  I mean my knee just wont move the way it should. My goal is to get back to work someday.

Overall I am  happy with myself, I am pretty, I am smart, I am good hearted , kind, compassionate giving person. I’m happy with my life, in spite of the challenges I deal with daily but I feel as if I’m struggling to be happy with my actual body. I mean I have a few things that are keeping me from dropping some weight which in turn will help my bones.

Dealing with adrenal fatigue and hashimoto’s on top of hypothyroidism , osteonecrosis , osteoarthritis and spondylolethesis just some days is well challenging.

My body is changing constantly, with new aches and pains.. It hurts a persons confidence sometimes. Don’t get me wrong, I am, confident  but I’m not 100%. like I used to be.

How can I be? My body stops me from being able to do things,like hiking which I miss and love, I cant roller skate anymore , I cant work like I used to . I also can’t  wear things because of the pain like my spike heels.

My fashion choices have changed as I have gained weight and when my pain gets worse,

If you were looking to me for some magical answers with this post, I don’t really  have any.

I’m exploring it all myself.

Yes I try many things some help a little , some help a lot but all seem to be temporary.

I do things like take curcumin for my pain, I make sure I eat healthy.

I am a Flexitarian who eats mostly plant based. I take my vitamins, I do exercise as best as I can.

Chronic pain affects people in different ways, but I really don’t think people understand how it can effect our body confidence.

I just cannot sit for 1-2 hours everyday to curl my hair & put on makeup, nor do I really want to.  I am now a eyeliner – lipstick kinda woman now and of course I still curl my hair just not with all the products in my hair

Can I wear a bra around the house? Mmmm I could but why LOL.

I try to ride my recumbent bike a few miles daily

Some days I walk some but its really a pain because depending on where I walk my knee will either love it or hate it.

My new thing is using dumbell’s every other day they are 8 lbs each ,

I have to keep the muscles somehow. And I am hoping I can build more muscle lose more fat.

I only use them for a few moves because I cant squat due to the knee problem and if I tried my knee pain would have me on the floor.

I don’t care if i lose 50 lbs but a good 25 would be nice. I dont even mind being a plus size curvy girl, I just know for my height and health of my bones dropping 25-30 lbs would be a real plus .I know I would feel so much better if I could drop some of this weight, I love me ,I love my body, I just want to love it more again.

Now Some Facts :

Here’s a look at what fat does to arthritis, as well as some tips to put you on the road to losing weight.

Fat and Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis, OA, is the most common type of arthritis, affecting approximately 27 million Americans. It is characterized by the breakdown of cartilage – the flexible but tough connective tissue that covers the ends of bones at joints. Age, injury, heredity and lifestyle factors all affect the risk of OA.

Why Obesity Matters

OA has a logical link to obesity: The more weight that’s on a joint, the more stressed the joint becomes, and the more likely it will wear down and be damaged.

“Weight plays an important role in joint stress, so when people are very overweight, it puts stress on their joints, especially their weight-bearing joints, like the knees and the hips,” says Eric Matteson, MD, chair of the rheumatology division at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Every pound of excess weight exerts about 4 pounds of extra pressure on the knees. So a person who is 10 pounds overweight has 40 pounds of extra pressure on his knees; if a person is 50 pounds overweight, that is 200 pounds of extra pressure on his knees. “So if you think about all the steps you take in a day, you can see why it would lead to premature damage in weight-bearing joints,” says Dr. Matteson.

That’s why people who are overweight are at greater risk of developing arthritis in the first place. And once a person has arthritis, “the additional weight causes even more problems on already damaged joints,” says Dr. Matteson.

But it’s not just the extra weight on joints that’s causing damage. The fat itself is active tissue that creates and releases chemicals, many of which promote inflammation.

“These chemicals can influence the development of OA,” explains Jeffrey N. Katz, MD, a professor of medicine and orthopaedic surgery at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

This effect can be seen in the numerous studies that have linked extra weight to hand OA. “Obviously, you don’t walk on your hands, so there may be something that is produced by fat cells in the body that causes the joint to break down more rapidly than it might otherwise,” says David Felson, MD, a professor of medicine and epidemiology at Boston University School of Medicine.

For both reasons – excess joint stress and inflammatory chemicals – fat should be kept in check among all people, especially those who already have OA.

For more info on how Excess fat can Affect The Bones with various conditions click >>>  How Fat Affects Bones

Curves