Posted in Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Diagnosed, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, exercise, Factor V Leiden, Food, Hacks, Happiness, Herbal, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, Music, OA, Osteonecrosis, Positivity, Uncategorized, Vision

Various Relaxation Techniques

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The information provided on this website is for educational purposes only. By using the website you are participating at your own risk.

With so much stress that comes with having a chronic condition and the world we live in is full of several fast paced situations , hurry here, hurry there , doctor appointments, tests,people with little to no patience and they want us to move a bit faster!
Excuse You! But I have a bone disease and I am going as fast as I can.
People judging us
It can be overwhelming
It's no wonder at the end of a day we can't sleep.

I think personally everyone needs to learn how to just open our mind relax and chill a little.

Relaxation Techniques
Using the Relaxation Response to Relieve Stress

For many of us, relaxation means zoning out in front of the TV at the end of a stressful day.

But this does little to reduce the damaging effects of stress.

To effectively combat stress, we need to activate the body's natural relaxation response.
You can do this by practicing relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation, rhythmic exercise, and yoga or chair yoga if you are challenged with Bone and joint issues.

Fitting these activities into your life can help reduce everyday stress, boost your energy and mood, and improve your mental and physical health..

What is the relaxation response? Well based on what I have read …
When stress overwhelms your nervous system, your body is flooded with chemicals that prepare you for "fight or flight."
This stress response can be lifesaving in emergency situations where you need to act quickly.
But when it’s constantly activated by the stresses of everyday life, it can wear your body down and take a toll on your emotional health.

No one can avoid all stress, but you can counteract its detrimental effects by learning how to produce the relaxation response, a state of deep rest that is the polar opposite of the stress response. The relaxation response puts the brakes on stress and brings your body and mind back into a state of equilibrium.
When the relaxation response is activated, your:
heart rate slows down
breathing becomes slower and deeper
blood pressure drops or stabilizes
muscles relax
blood flow to the brain increases

In addition to its calming physical effects, the relaxation response also increases energy and focus, combats illness, relieves aches and pains, heightens problem-solving abilities, and boosts motivation and productivity. Best of all, anyone can reap these benefits with regular practice.
How to produce the relaxation response
Simply laying on the couch, reading, or watching TV while sometimes relaxing isn’t going to produce the physical and psychological benefits of the relaxation response. For that, you’ll need to actively practice a relaxation technique.
Finding the relaxation technique that’s best for you may be interesting because there is no single relaxation technique that is best for everyone.
So I am going to touch base on a few and post their YouTube links below.

The right relaxation technique is the one that resonates with you, fits your lifestyle, and is able to focus your mind and interrupt your everyday thoughts to elicit the relaxation response. You may even find that alternating or combining different techniques provide the best results.

How you react to stress may also influence the relaxation technique that works best for you:

The “fight” response. If you tend to become angry, agitated, or keyed up under stress, you will respond best to stress relief activities that quiet you down, such as meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, deep breathing, or guided imagery.
The “flight” response. If you tend to become depressed, withdrawn, or spaced out under stress, you will respond best to stress relief activities that are stimulating and energize your nervous system, such as rhythmic exercise, massage, mindfulness, or power yoga.

The immobilization response. If you’ve experienced some type of trauma and tend to “freeze” or become “stuck” under stress, your challenge is to first rouse your nervous system to a fight or flight response (above) so you can employ the applicable stress relief techniques.
To do this, choose physical activity that engages both your arms and legs, such as running, dancing, or tai chi, and perform it mindfully, focusing on the sensations in your limbs as you move.

Deep breathing
With its focus on full, cleansing breaths, deep breathing is a simple yet powerful relaxation technique. It’s easy to learn, can be practiced almost anywhere, and provides a quick way to get your stress levels in check. Deep breathing is the cornerstone of many other relaxation practices, too, and can be combined with other relaxing elements such as aromatherapy and music. All you really need is a few minutes and a place to stretch out.
How to practice deep breathing
The key to deep breathing is to breathe deeply from the abdomen, getting as much fresh air as possible in your lungs. When you take deep breaths from the abdomen, rather than shallow breaths from your upper chest, you inhale more oxygen. The more oxygen you get, the less tense, short of breath, and anxious you feel.
Sit comfortably with your back straight. Put one hand on your chest and the other on your stomach.
Breathe in through your nose. The hand on your stomach should rise. The hand on your chest should move very little.
Exhale through your mouth, pushing out as much air as you can while contracting your abdominal muscles. The hand on your stomach should move in as you exhale, but your other hand should move very little.
Continue to breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth. Try to inhale enough so that your lower abdomen rises and falls. Count slowly as you exhale.

If you find it difficult breathing from your abdomen while sitting up, try lying down. Put a small book on your stomach, and breathe so that the book rises as you inhale and falls as you exhale.

Progressive muscle relaxation
Progressive muscle relaxation is a two-step process in which you systematically tense and relax different muscle groups in the body. With regular practice, it gives you an intimate familiarity with what tension as well as complete relaxation feels like in different parts of the body. This can help you to you react to the first signs of the muscular tension that accompanies stress. And as your body relaxes, so will your mind.

Progressive muscle relaxation can be combined with deep breathing for additional stress relief.
Practicing progressive muscle relaxation
Consult with your doctor first if you have a history of muscle spasms, back problems, or other serious injuries that may be aggravated by tensing muscles.
Start at your feet and work your way up to your face, trying to only tense those muscles intended.
1. Loosen clothing, take off your shoes, and get comfortable.
2. Take a few minutes to breathe in and out in slow, deep breaths.
3. When you’re ready, shift your attention to your right foot. Take a moment to focus on the way it feels.
4. Slowly tense the muscles in your right foot, squeezing as tightly as you can. Hold for a count of 10.
5. Relax your foot. Focus on the tension flowing away and how your foot feels as it becomes limp and loose.
6. Stay in this relaxed state for a moment, breathing deeply and slowly.
7. Shift your attention to your left foot. Follow the same sequence of muscle tension and release.
8. Move slowly up through your body, contracting and relaxing the different muscle groups.
9. It may take some practice at first, but try not to tense muscles other than those intended.

Mindfulness meditation
Rather than worrying about the future or dwelling on the past, mindfulness meditation switches the focus to what’s happening right now, enabling you to be fully engaged in the present moment.

Meditations that cultivate mindfulness have long been used to reduce stress, anxiety, depression, and other negative emotions. Some of these meditations bring you into the present by focusing your attention on a single repetitive action, such as your breathing, a few repeated words, or the flickering light of a candle. Other forms of mindfulness meditation encourage you to follow and then release internal thoughts or sensations. Mindfulness can also be applied to activities such as walking, exercising, or eating.
A basic mindfulness exercise:
1. Sit on a straight-backed chair or cross-legged on the floor.
2. Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling.
3. Once you've narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations, and thoughts.
4. Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.

Body scan meditation
This is a type of meditation that that focuses your attention on various parts of your body. Like progressive muscle relaxation, you start with your feet and work your way up. But instead of tensing and relaxing muscles, you simply focus on the way each part of your body feels, without labeling the sensations as either “good” or “bad”.
Practicing body scan meditation
Lie on your back, legs uncrossed, arms relaxed at your sides, eyes open or closed. Focus on your breathing for about two minutes until you start to feel relaxed.
Turn your focus to the toes of your right foot. Notice any sensations you feel while continuing to also focus on your breathing. Imagine each deep breath flowing to your toes. Remain focused on this area for one to two minutes.
Move your focus to the sole of your right foot. Tune in to any sensations you feel in that part of your body and imagine each breath flowing from the sole of your foot. After one or two minutes, move your focus to your right ankle and repeat. Move to your calf, knee, thigh, hip, and then repeat the sequence for your left leg. From there, move up the torso, through the lower back and abdomen, the upper back and chest, and the shoulders. Pay close attention to any area of the body that causes you pain or discomfort.
After completing the body scan, relax for a while in silence and stillness, noting how your body feels. Then slowly open your eyes and stretch, if necessary.
Rhythmic movement and mindful exercise
The idea of exercising may not sound particularly soothing, but rhythmic exercise that gets you into a flow of repetitive movement can be very relaxing. Examples include:
Running
Walking
Swimming
Dancing
Rowing
Climbing
For maximum stress relief, add mindfulness to your workout
While simply engaging in rhythmic exercise will help you relieve stress, if you add a mindfulness component on top, you’ll get even more benefit.
As with meditation, mindful exercise requires being fully engaged in the present moment—paying attention to how your body feels right now, rather than your daily worries or concerns. In order to “turn off” your thoughts, focus on the sensations in your limbs and how your breathing complements your movement.
If you’re walking or running, for example, focus on the sensation of your feet touching the ground, the rhythm of your breath, and the feeling of the wind against your face. If your mind wanders to other thoughts, gently return to focusing on your breathing and movement.
Visualization
Visualization, or guided imagery, is a variation on traditional meditation that involves imagining a scene in which you feel at peace, free to let go of all tension and anxiety. Choose whatever setting is most calming to you, whether it’s a tropical beach, a favorite childhood spot, or a quiet wooded glen.
You can practice visualization on your own or with a therapist (or an audio recording of a therapist) guiding you through the imagery. You can also choose to do your visualization in silence or use listening aids, such as soothing music or a sound machine or recording that matches your chosen setting—the sound of ocean waves if you’ve chosen a beach, for example.
Practicing visualization
Close your eyes and imagine your restful place. Picture it as vividly as you can—everything you can see, hear, smell, taste, and feel. Just “looking” at it like you would a photograph is not enough. Visualization works best if you incorporate as many sensory details as possible.
For example, if you are thinking about a dock on a quiet lake:
See the sun setting over the water
Hear the birds singing
Smell the pine trees
Feel the cool water on your bare feet
Taste the fresh, clean air
Enjoy the feeling of your worries drifting away as you slowly explore your restful place. When you are ready, gently open your eyes and come back to the present.
Don't worry if you sometimes zone out or lose track of where you are during a visualization session. This is normal. You may also experience feelings of heaviness in your limbs, muscle twitches, or yawning. Again, these are normal responses.
Yoga and tai chi
Yoga involves a series of both moving and stationary poses, combined with deep breathing. As well as reducing anxiety and stress, yoga can also improve flexibility, strength, balance, and stamina. Since injuries can happen when yoga is practiced incorrectly, it’s best to learn by attending group classes, hiring a private teacher, or at least following video instructions. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others, tailoring your practice as you see fit.

If you’re unsure whether a specific yoga class is appropriate for stress relief, call the studio or ask the teacher.
Tai chi
If you’ve seen a group of people in the park slowly moving in synch, you’ve probably witnessed tai chi. Tai chi is a self-paced, non-competitive series of slow, flowing body movements. By focusing your mind on the movements and your breathing, you keep your attention on the present, which clears the mind and leads to a relaxed state.
Tai chi is a safe, low-impact option for people of all ages and fitness levels, including older adults and those recovering from injuries. As with yoga, it's best learned in a class or from a private instructor. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others.
Self-massage
You’re probably already aware how much a professional massage at a spa or health club can help reduce stress, relieve pain, and ease muscle tension. What you may not be aware of is that you can experience many of the same benefits at home or work by practicing self-massage—or trading massages with a loved one.
Try taking a few minutes to massage yourself at your desk between tasks, on the couch at the end of a hectic day, or in bed to help you unwind before sleep. To enhance relaxation, you can use aromatic oil, scented lotion, or combine self-message with mindfulness or deep breathing techniques.

Starting a regular relaxation practice
Learning the basics of these relaxation techniques isn’t difficult, but it takes regular practice to truly harness their stress-relieving power. Most stress experts recommend setting aside at least 10 to 20 minutes a day for your relaxation practice. If you’d like to maximize the benefits, aim for 30 minutes to an hour.
Tips for making relaxation techniques part of your life
Set aside time in your daily schedule. If possible, schedule a set time once or twice a day for your practice. If your schedule is already packed, remember that many relaxation techniques can be practiced while you’re doing other things. Try meditating while commuting on the bus or train, taking a yoga or tai chi break at lunchtime, or practicing mindful walking while exercising your dog.
Don't practice when you're sleepy. These techniques are so relaxing that they can make you very sleepy. However, you will get the most benefit if you practice when you’re fully alert. Avoid practicing close to bedtime or after a heavy meal or alcohol.
Expect ups and downs. Don’t be discouraged if you skip a few days or even a few weeks. Just get started again and slowly build up to your old momentum.
If you exercise, improve the relaxation benefits by adopting mindfulness. Instead of zoning out or staring at a TV as you exercise, try focusing your attention on your body. If you’re resistance training, for example, focus on coordinating your breathing with your movements and pay attention to how your body feels as you raise and lower weights.

Here is a few links I use to
relax
reduce pain
help me sleep better

These are my favorites and I listen to it daily and a few I listen to now and then

Daily
Mindfulness
https://youtu.be/-2zdUXve6fQ

Stress Relief and Confidence
https://youtu.be/-KMngzCWgTw

Morning Meditation for Healing
https://youtu.be/q9ZR_CJhuLc

Reiki for pain relief
https://youtu.be/3nJtajgAb34

Relax Video Male Voice
https://youtu.be/_jD3VxSGM-k

https://youtu.be/oA_rY4N8XJA

Sounds for Anxiety depression
https://youtu.be/AmqDOA-JALg

Meditation Sounds for pain relief
https://youtu.be/XiNne25uMK8

To help you sleep
https://youtu.be/xQ6xgDI7Whc

Disclaimer
Usage Policy

The information provided on this website is for educational purposes only. By using the website you are participating at your own risk.
• Make sure you practise with enough free space around you. Wear comfortable clothing so you can move freely.
• Please take responsibility for your own body and include extra warm up and cool down stretches where appropriate.
• You should avoid alcohol and drugs before yoga and meditation. Also no heavy meals for two hours before practice. Keep yourself hydrated before and after your yoga practice.
• If you feel dizzy, light-headed, faint, or if you experience any other discomfort, stop exercising immediately and consult a medical doctor. You are responsible for your condition during your practice. Exercise within your limits. Never force or strain. Seek attention and advice as appropriate.
• We offer no medical advice. You should consult a medical practitioner before starting any new exercise regime. This is particularly important if you are overweight, pregnant, nursing, regularly taking medications, or have any existing medical conditions. This website may not be tailored to your current physical and mental health. We accept no liability whatsoever for any damages arising from the use of this website.
• We do not recommend that you attempt any of this or yoga exercises for the first time without suitable experience or supervision.
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Posted in #Blessed30Challenge, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Happiness, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, OA, Osteonecrosis, Positivity, Rosacea, Uncategorized, Vision

Body Betrayal: How to Find Gratitude and Happiness While Coping w/ Chronic Pain or Illness

This disease called Avascular Necrosis is a terrible one especially when your dealing with multifocal avn.

I am grateful to only have it in one joint

All chronic conditions that change our life and lifestyle suck and if we're not careful depression could easily take over and we lose sight of the beautiful spiritual being we are on this human journey called life.

I understand it can be depressing, being on a fixed income blows, I understand you may not be able to do the same things as before but your still the kind loving person you always were.

Don't let the pain consume your every thought.

Don't ever doubt that you have a purpose we all have a purpose in life and sometimes it will change somehow we are going through this for a reason. I'm not sure what that reason is but we were all put on this path for something.

Maybe we are going through this instead of dealing with something worse.

Do you like to write? draw? paint? poetry? craft?

I personally love photography

Are you able to still drive?

What is the one thing that could help make your life easier?

I always think of this quote when I am sad in pain and missing my old "normal " life.
Now I have a new normal

As long as you make an identity for yourself out of pain, you cannot be free of it.”
Eckhart Tolle

Up until the past year , I also often felt betrayed by my body. It was always breaking down, leaving me frustrated and pissed off.

No one else around me seemed to have as many problems.

Each moment we are in chronic pain or dealing with illness, we can choose our attitude toward it. I know pain is a bitch and it sucks and we can't do the things we used to. But maybe we have to focus on the things we can do and celebrate small victories vs beating ourselves up for things we are unable to do.

So I wanted to share a few small tips I’ve learned along the way

1. Do what you can.
Focusing on all the ways you are limited brings on a case of the “poor me’s” lickety split. “Poor-me-land” is the most unfun place ever so get outta there as quick as you can and hop on the gratitude train.
Seriously. Focusing on what you can do gives you more inner peace, keeps you grounded, and inspires you to take action.

2. Don’t do what you can’t.
Being a martyr and pushing yourself to try to appear less weak to yourself or others is a recipe for disaster. So don’t try to be a hero. If it hurts or it will hurt, and you hear yourself saying, “I should” or “Screw it, I’m doing it anyway” that means your inner critic has barged in and is running the show.
The best way I’ve learned to deal with mine is to banish to a sofa.
As weird as this may sound, it’s my way of calming down.
Then I have the grace to give myself a break.

3. Stop trying to heal.
I know it sounds weird, but hear me out. The idea of “healing” brings to my mind someone who is sick, broken, less than good enough.

What if instead of trying to heal yourself, ask yourself if you treat your body with absolute kindness?
What would that look like?
Of course you may still need to see health practitioners, but your intention shifts from getting someone to fix what is broken, to the ultimate in self-nurturing.

4. Meditate.
I don’t think there is a person alive who couldn’t benefit from meditation.This is really true for anyone experiencing chronic pain.
If you are unsure how message me.

5. Invest as much as you can in your health.
Eat as well as you can afford.
Get enough sleep
Rest when your body needs rest. You must laugh at least once a day. See your doctor and take your meds as directed.

6. Nourish yourself.
When I feel like crap or am in pain it’s so easy to eat sugary foods or chips to comfort myself and it's quick. Who wants to cook when your in pain

But it always backfires because I end up feeling empty and drained after the rushing sugar or carb high. When I choose food that I know my body will love me for, it helps me by putting more energy into healing itself. I feel more alive when I eat healthy.

7. Find pleasure.
Illness is a drag, no doubt about it. But humor and pleasure are incredibly healing. Surround yourself with as much pleasure as you can. It doesn’t have to be grandiose or expensive.
Simple pleasures every day can help alleviate suffering, whether it’s watching a comedy, crocheting, painting,using your favorite tea cup, being in nature, reading a good novel or listening to your favorite cd.

Whatever works for you.
Write a list of your favorite things, because sometimes we forget in the moment, and reminding ourselves of the fun stuff helps us do a 180 toward joy.

We have to every single day get up tell ourself how wonderful we are compliment your kids.
Celebrating the small things we can do will help us take our mind of what we can't do.

Your life style may have changed but your still a beautiful spiritual being on a human journey.
We cannot lose sight of how great we are pain or no pain.

Good Comedians to laugh at
Ralph May.
Katt Williams
Jay Larson
Ali Wong
Ellen De generous
Janeane Garofalo

Relaxation and meditation sounds
You
https://youtu.be/luRkeDCoxZ4

I may have days may pain takes over and my plans have to change.
But I am grateful for I was allowed another day to start again and appreciate my family and friends

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Diagnosed, DNA, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Happiness, Homemade Syrups,Tinctures,Rubs, Inflammation, Mindfulness, OA, Osteonecrosis, Positivity, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Support Group, Hope, Uncategorized, WegoHealth

~Health  Awards ~ Advocate Nominee 

I was notified about a month ago I was nominated for a few awards in a few categories for awareness I vowed when diagnosed with avn /on I would never want anyone to feel as alone and scared as I did in 2014. 

https://awards.wegohealth.com/nominees/12801

My Ortho who diagnosed me really never took the time to even explain to me what I had, or come up with any positive plan of action. He did say when I asked when the plan was …..we will wait until your knee collapses and the replace it !!

Are you frickin kidding me!! That was his plan of action.

Well thank god my knee still is hanging in there and no sign of collapse and when it does happen if that happens he won't be doing surgery.

After the initial shock and grief I went through for what my life was and what may now be I vowed to be a world changer The Ortho also failed to tell me how rare this is and when I did my own research and found out how rare it was rare, it  left me feeling even more alone.

Sure my husband was and family were supportive but they had no clue what I had 

I also have a few other medical issues 

Osteoarthritis Spondylolisthesis Hypothyroidism , Factor V, Rbbb.

And I advocate for all and then some. 
I don't want anyone who was diagnosed with anything to ever feel alone. 

But when you have an orphan disease it just makes it harder some days to deal with. 

It's not like heart disease or cancer where there is constant education, awareness and research being done. 

I hope to change that. Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis had no cause ribbon so I made them, designed them. Now we have one

There was little information I changed that, I wrote a booklet for patients who have or are just diagnosed with Avascular Necrosis/Osteonecrosis 

I stay up to date on new treatments, trials

I also compiled an ongoing list of doctors not just locally but world wide who are knowledgeable in Avascular Necrosis/Osteonecrosis.

I am so honored to have been nominated 

I was nominated for 8 or 9 different categories and I am asking for your support(vote).

I would greatly appreciate it. 

Also there are so many other wonderful nominees maybe you could also give them a vote as well
Here is how it works 

Click below link

You will come to my wegohealth leader profile 

When you click endorse you will have the option to share it you don't have to but thanks if you do. 

It will then take you back to endorse screen so you can vote for the next award I am nominated for. 
As an advocate for Osteonecrosis and a few others things, like Osteoarthritis,Spondylolisthesis,Hypothyroidism, Heart Disease I take pride in all the research I do to raise awareness. 


I am a voice and resource in a rare community for those of us who are suffering with Avascular Necrosis/Osteonecrosis the orphan disease most people have never heard of unless your diagnosed.
I have the honor this year again of being nominated for many of the categories 16 health awards this year as a member of wegohealth.

Thank You In Advance. 

https://awards.wegohealth.com/nominees/12801

Posted in Avascular Necrosis, Blessed, Bone Health, Happiness, Life, Mindfulness, Positivity, Uncategorized

Emotional Contagion


Have you ever clocked in at work happy ready to siege the day only to have coworkers depress you in no time?

Or you hear people complaining about this or that and before you know it, you to are complaining?

Or a family member always looks at the glass half empty rather than half full?

Or be around someone who complains about anything and everything all the time. To hot ,to cold to wet , to dry, and on and on and on…..

Peoples emotions are contagious.

Emotional contagion is the phenomenon of having one person’s emotions and related behaviors directly trigger similar emotions and behaviors in other people.

So try to choose happiness, gratitude, joy, also if you have any chronic condition think healing and pain free.

Keep those thoughts positive vs negative.

Your mind will become open to amazing things. 
Try it for 14 days you will be so glad you did. 
Everyday when you wake up write down 3 things pen to paper that you are grateful.


In the middle of the day send an encouraging text to someone.


Find something good in every day




It will change your outlook on everything just give it time. 

I want to spread happiness, love, joy, positivity and I want people to think of me as uplifting, positive happy. 
Do have pain yes somedays worse than others and somedays I am so frustrated I could just scream.

But I noticed have a couple chronic conditions, complaining about it to everyone I meet isn’t helping my pain any. But I have noticed that when I choose to be positive in spite of pain, sadness whatever it is I can pull myself out of a funk.

“Kinda like fakebit tip you make it”
Emotions are more contagious than any disease a smile or a frown will spread faster than any virus. 


Have a happy positive sunny lovely painfree day 

Posted in Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Disclaimer, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, Osteonecrosis, Pain, Positivity, Rare Disease Day, Uncategorized, WegoHealth

I learn all I can about Avascular Necrosis

I have made it my goal to learn and educate others who also have the same disease I do

I worked hard studied and also got tis certificate

I keep myself updated on all and any new treatments on AVN/ON

You have to be your own advocate but I also pride myself on being a voice for others

certifavndeb