Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Hearing Loss, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Link-Between Hearing Loss and RA

When we think of hearing loss, you may associate it with your loved one who’s always asking you to repeat yourself, or the friend who may struggle to follow conversations.

Hearing loss is often caused by exposure to excessive noise and is even linked to the natural aging process. But did you know that hearing loss isn’t just caused by your loud job, or the blaring music at the concert ?

Along with lesser known causes of hearing loss like smoking and diabetes, a recent study found a link between hearing loss and rheumatoid arthritis.

 

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease that affects many seniors, though young people can also suffer from the disease. Around 1.5 million Americans have RA, and this number continues to rise. RA is an autoimmune disease, which means that the immune system turns against the body. Rather than protecting the body from sicknesses by warding off viral and bacterial infections, the immune system attacks the joints, causing swelling, inflammation, and pain. RA can damage cartilage and tissue around the joints, disform the joints, and even damage the bone. It becomes painful to move the affected joints, and leads to reduced mobility, and difficulty performing normal daily tasks.

Linking Hearing Loss and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Clinical trials looking at the links between hearing loss and arthritis found far higher rates of hearing loss among those with arthritis. Those with RA were more likely to have sensorineural hearing loss, hearing loss associated with the ear and not the brain. Delicate cells in the inner ear are damaged in this type of hearing loss, and once these cells are damaged, they don’t regenerate. You’ll be unable to hear certain sounds in the environment, since the cells in the ear responsible for those sounds have been destroyed.

A 2006 study found that around 43% of those with RA had hearing loss! And a study from the Mayo Clinic, reported that even though they weren’t able to detect measurably higher rates of hearing loss among those with RA, their patients with RA were far more likely to perceive that they had hearing loss.

 

How does RA Lead to Hearing Loss?

Researchers are still unclear on the how rheumatoid arthritis and hearing loss are linked. However, it’s clear that RA can attack other body systems, not just the joints, so the cells in the ear can also be affected by this disease.

Another link could be the drugs used to treat the pain that goes hand in hand with arthritis. Many studies have found that common pain killers, such as ibuprofen (Advil) and acetaminophen (Tylenol) can cause hearing loss. Even taking these pain killers two or more days per week was linked to worse hearing health, while those who took pain killers six days a week had a 24% higher risk of hearing loss than those who didn’t take pain killers. Those suffering from RA often take a lot of painkillers just to get through the day, and these drugs are known to reduce blood flow and deprive the cells in the inner ear of the oxygen and nutrients they need to survive.

Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis

While doctors can’t cure RA, they all agree that treating the disease as soon as possible is essential for good health outcomes. Treating RA stops inflammation, prevents further joint damage or deformity, and relieves pain. It also improves overall well-being by allowing for increased mobility and physical function. Treatments include medications to ease symptoms, as well as to reduce inflammation and slow joint damage.

Self-management is also important when it comes to RA, and your doctor will help you be proactive in managing the disease and maintaining your overall quality of life. Eating well, exercising often and resting, using heat pads, and learning relaxation techniques all play a role in self-management.

Treating Hearing Loss

If you’ve been struggling to hear, and think it may be linked to your RA, call your local hearing center.

May is Arthritis Awareness Month

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Bone and Joint Health, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Osteoporosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Joint Pain and Our Government

It’s that damn pain that may creep up slowly on you with a dull, discomfort in one or several of your joints.

Or it might be like a raging inferno it like a thief in the night, to steal your joy or try to…. the pain comes on suddenly without any warning, bringing on that stabbing intensity as sharp as a knife.

The pain might come and go, or it may last hours, days, weeks…. This pain is arthritis, and it’s likely you know someone living with it or you may be living with it yourself.

It is not just a grandparents issue.

I have been living with arthritis for over 20 years, I think I was 35-36 when I was diagnosed with osteoarthritis, only years later to be diagnosed also with osteonecrosis in 2014 and spondylolisthesis for over 5 years. It can really be exhausting from always dealing with some sort of pain.

Arthritis can be crippling. Some people even need a stair-lift just so they can move freely around their house as they are in too much pain to walk up and down the stairs. Some end up in a wheelchair or using a walker.

Did you know that arthritis impacts more than 50 million adults and 300,000 children in the U.S. According to The Arthritis Foundation, the number of people affected by the condition is expected to increase to 65-68 million by 2030.

More research is needed to combat this health crisis, a disease and source of chronic pain for so many people that it is often marginalized by misinformed attitudes, old wise tales, and social stigma.

Our government officials are not helping us either. They are trying to tell doctors what to prescribe and how much and limit them on treating their patients.

I wish the government would stay out of my health and my doctors business.

My doctor went to school many years and I don’t want some politician giving me medical advice when they have no idea what I live with on a daily basis.Nor have they went to school to become a doctor either.

Many like myself cannot take NSAIDs and when you have osteonecrosis,you really don’t want to constantly be using steroids.

I avoid steroids at all costs.

Arthritis includes more than 100 different types of joint disease and related conditions. I have written previously about osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and juvenile arthritis.

In the most basic terms, arthritis is inflammation of the joints that causes swelling, stiffness, reduced range of motion, and pain that can become chronic. It can affect your knees,ankles and toes, back, hip, fingers, wrists, elbows, shoulders, or neck.

Did you know that the heart, eyes, lungs, kidneys and skin can sometimes also be effected?

Arthritis can also affect your muscles, resulting in muscle weakness or fatigue.

The extra weight from obesity can strain your joints if you are not eating well and exercising regularly.

Your bones are like a bridge and like with any other bridge it has a weight limit before it starts to damage the bridge.

So we have to try to keep moving remove excess weight to keep out bridge aka our bones and joints strong and able to support us.

So many people often dismiss arthritis as a condition of older adulthood, but arthritis can strike any age, gender or race, and it is the leading cause of disability in the United States.

Chronic pain sufferers fear they could become casualties in the war on Ohio’s opioid overdose epidemic.

Because it seems like those who suffer in pain real chronic pain are the only ones paying the price.

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What they ( our elected officials ) don’t understand is responsible people are the ones suffering, not the drug addicts who use heroin and get many of their drugs illegally.

In August 2019 Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said that evidence recently made public makes clear that drugmakers were responsible for the deadly opioid crisis and that they had lied about the addictiveness of their painkillers.

I’m sorry but ya know I don’t buy that crap at all.

When will people actually learn to take responsibility for their own poor choices?

There has been people using and abusing drugs for decades, longer….

lThey are looking to get high, that’s a big difference than someone needing a pain pill now and then to function and have joint mobility and the pain managed.

I get so frustrated at our government always telling patients whats good for them.

And telling doctors how to do their job.

I don’t want my car mechanic telling my dentist how to clean my teeth.

And I don’t want my elected officials telling my doctor what to do.

Why not ban alcohol ?

Why not ban cigarettes

That kills a lot more people and well we know how many abuse that.

Probably because they get a tax on that , so that’s ok.

Just like marijuana, years ago you went to prison , now because the state can make a buck its ok as long as its medical.

According to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey, in 2013, more than half of the US adult population drank alcohol in the past 30 days. About 17% of the adult population reported binge drinking, and 6% reported heavy drinking.

According to the ARDI application, during 2006–2010, excessive alcohol use was responsible for an annual average of  88,000 deaths, including 1 in 10 deaths among working-age adults aged 20 to 64 years, and 2.5 million years of potential life lost.  More than half of these deaths and three-quarters of the years of potential life lost were due to binge drinking.  https://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/data-stats.htm

 

The Republican Governor of Ohio urged the companies to move quickly to settle pending lawsuits seeking to hold them accountable for the epidemic in light of troves of new documents made public because of those suits. And who gets the money from these lawsuits? Certainly not the people that were or are addicted , or their families……no it’s the state.

 

Get stricter on drunk driving laws https://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/impaired_driving/states-data-tables.html

 

But for gosh sakes stop punishing people responsible people who just are trying to live dealing with their chronic pain. To function, to get to work, to grocery shop to live.

Please get involved write or call your elected officials : tell them help those living with chronic pain not make them suffer.

They are not drug addicts they are people like you and me and your neighbor and like your grandparent, mother, uncle son or daughter suffering with chronic pain.

https://www.usa.gov/elected-officials

 

 

The most 5 common types of arthritis are Osteoarthritis, Fibromyalgia, Gout, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than a third of adults who have arthritis report it limits their leisure and work activities. 25% of them state it also causes severe pain (7+ on the 0 to 10 point pain scale).

Children and teens get a type of arthritis called juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). “Juvenile” means young (16 yrs of age or younger) and “idiopathic” means the cause is not known. JIA is also sometimes called juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA).

Many people confuse osteoporosis and different types of arthritis.

  • Arthritis: A general term for conditions that affect the joints and surrounding tissues. Joints are places in the body where bones come together, such as the knees, wrists, fingers, toes, and hips. The two most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Osteoporosis: A condition in which the bones become less dense and more likely to fracture. In osteoporosis, there is a loss of bone tissue that leaves bones less dense and more likely to fracture. It can result in a loss of height, severe back pain, and change in posture. Osteoporosis can impair a person’s ability to walk and can cause prolonged or permanent disability – Difference Between Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

References

Arthritis Foundation

AF types of arthritis

Posted in Arthritis, Bone Health, osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Facts About Arthritis

View or download the Arthritis Foundation’s “Arthritis by the Numbers” book

Arthritis Disability

Arthritis is the leading cause of disability among adults in the U.S.

Arthritis Prevalence

  • By conservative estimates, about 54 million adults have doctor-diagnosed arthritis.
  • Almost 300,000 babies and children have arthritis or a rheumatic condition.
  • The most common type of arthritis is osteoarthritis, which affects an estimated 31 million Americans.
  • Number of people expected to have doctor-diagnosed arthritis by the year 2040: more than 78 million.

Who Gets Arthritis

Doctor-diagnosed arthritis is more common in women (26 percent) than in men (18 percent). In some types, such as rheumatoid arthritis, women far outnumber men.

Economic Cost of Arthritis

Almost two-thirds of adults in the U.S. with arthritis are of working age (18-64 years).

Arthritis and other non-traumatic joint disorders are among the five most costly conditions among adults 18 and older.

Co-morbidities

Arthritis is much more common among people who have other chronic conditions.

  • 49 percent of adults with heart disease have arthritis.
  • 47 percent of adults with diabetes have arthritis.
  • 31 percent of adults who are obese have arthritis

arthritis

I am a proud New Patient Leader and representative for the Arthritis Foundation.

I will be raising awareness and setting up local meetings in my hometown so we can have a voice and spread awareness locally

Posted in Arthritis, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis, Pain, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Understanding The Mechanisms of Pain

It’s safe to say most of us are not really fans of pain. However it is one of the body’s most important ways for communication. Imagine, for instance, what would happen if you felt nothing when you put your hand in hot water, or burned your neck with a curling iron , or hit your thumb with a hammer and never felt that pain signal.

Pain is one way the body tells you something’s wrong and needs attention.

But pain whether it comes from a burn, a broken bone, surgery, joint replacement or a long-term illness is also an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience.

It has multiple causes, and people respond to it in multiple and individual ways. The pain that you push your way through might be incapacitating to someone else. Pain can make us mentally exhausted and sad if we experience it for to long.

Acute Pain and Chronic Pain

There are several ways to categorize pain. One is to separate it into acute pain and chronic pain.

Acute pain typically comes on suddenly and has a limited duration. It’s frequently caused by damage to tissue such as bone, skin, muscle, or organs, and the onset is often accompanied by anxiety or emotional distress.

Chronic pain lasts longer than acute pain and is generally somewhat resistant to medical treatment. It’s usually associated with a long-term illness, such as osteoarthritis. In some cases, such as with fibromyalgia, it’s one of the defining characteristic of the disease. Chronic pain can be the result of damaged tissue, but very often is attributable to nerve damage.

Just as there are different types of arthritis, there are also different types of pain. The pain you experience can come from various areas of the musculoskeletal system and involve different types of information processing. To learn more about the basics of the nervous system and pain.

Nociceptive Pain

What a odd word I never heard of this word until I was doing research on pain.

This is the normal mechanism that the body uses to process pain day to day. Nociceptive pain occurs when tiny nerves (nociceptors) that run on the surface of organs, muscles, joints and throughout the body are stimulated. These messages are carried by nerves to the brain. For example, when you bang your elbow, you feel nociceptive pain.

Mechanical Pain. Nociceptive pain that happens with stretch or pressure in and around joints is called mechanical pain. Osteoarthritis, low back disorders and tendinitis are common examples of mechanical pain.

Inflammatory Pain. Inflammation is an essential process that helps the body respond to and heal an injury. But it also activates nerves and causes pain. When joints are inflamed, damage to bone, muscles and cartilage (the slick surface between bones of the joints) can occur. Examples of inflammatory arthritis are rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, lupus, gout and ankylosing spondylitis.

Neuropathic pain happens when there’s too much or persistent pressure on nerves or they are damaged. It’s often described as burning, tingling, shooting, stinging or as “pins and needles.” Some people may describe a stabbing, piercing, cutting or drilling pain. An example of this type of pain is sciatic pain due to irritation of the sciatic nerve by a disc or bone spur. The pain starts at an area of the spine in the lower back and can run across the hip and buttock and down the leg.

 

Centralized pain was first used to describe pain that happens when the central nervous system (brain, brainstem, spinal cord) is damaged. It now is used to describe any pain that happens when the central nervous system doesn’t work properly and amplifies or increases the volume of pain. Other terms used to describe this condition include “central sensitization,” “central amplification” and “central pain syndrome.” Several common conditions, such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and temporomandibular joint disorder are examples. Arthritis joint pain can also become centralized in some people, especially if it is long-lasting.

Psychogenic pain is an older term for what happens when emotions cause pain in the body, make existing pain worse or make it last longer. As doctors learn more about how the central nervous system works, fewer types of pain are put in this category. For example, fibromyalgia was once considered psychogenic, but new discoveries have shown problems with pain processing in fibromyalgia. Headache, muscle pain and low back pain are commonly influenced by your emotions.

Wishing you a pain free day

Deb

Posted in Arthritis, Bone Health, Disclaimer, Life, OA, osteoarthritis, Pain, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Arthritis

Arthritis and related diseases can cause debilitating, life-changing pain. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of the adults who have arthritis report that it limits their leisure activities and work. And 25 percent of them say it causes severe pain (seven or higher on a zero to 10 point scale).

There are more than 100 different forms of arthritis and related diseases. The most common types include osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), fibromyalgia and gout. All of them cause pain in different ways.

Osteoarthritis
In osteoarthritis (OA), the protective cartilage inside the joint breaks down. This makes movement of affected joints more difficult and painful. In time, bones of the joint may rub directly against one another, causing severe pain. Pain can also come from parts of your joint other than the cartilage, such as bone, synovium and ligaments. The intensity of OA pain varies from person to person and can range from mild to severe.

Rheumatoid Arthritis
In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the joints and other organs are attacked by the body’s own immune system. The immune system normally protects a person from viruses, bacteria and other invaders. In people with autoimmune diseases like RA, it becomes overactive and attacks healthy tissue. In the case of RA, the immune system primarily goes after the lining of the joints, called the synovium. Over time, the persistent inflammation breaks down the joint and damages it permanently.

Pain in RA can come from other parts of your joint besides the synovium, such as bone and ligaments.

Psoriatic Arthritis
Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease in which the immune system attacks the body, causing inflammation and pain. PsA affects the joints, causing arthritis; the connective tissue where tendons or ligaments attach to bones, causing enthesitis; and the skin, causing psoriasis.

Fibromyalgia
Fibromyalgia is considered a central pain syndrome. This means that the brain and spinal cord process pain signals differently. A touch or movement that doesn’t cause pain for others may feel painful to you (this is called allodynia). Something that is mildly painful to someone without fibromyalgia may hurt you even more (this is called hyperalgesia).

Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread pain. It may come and go or be constant. Besides pain, fibromyalgia is associated with other symptoms, such as fatigue, sleep problems, inability to concentrate and mood troubles.

Gout
Gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis, but it does not cause body-wide inflammation like RA or PsA does. In gout, uric acid crystals are the problem. If your body produces too much uric acid or if you are unable to remove the excess fast enough, it can build up in the blood (called hyperuricemia). Excess uric acid can form crystals in your joints. This results in extremely painful joint inflammation. Gout usually strikes in the large joint of the big toe, but can also affect other joints. With a gout flare, you can go to bed feeling fine and wake up with excruciating pain.

Lupus
Lupus is an autoimmune inflammatory disease that affects many parts of the body, including the joints, kidneys, skin, blood, brain and other organs. It can cause joint pain, fatigue, hair loss, sensitivity to light, fever, rash and kidney problems.

Back Pain
Back pain can be a symptom of several forms of arthritis and related conditions, including ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and fibromyalgia. Most back pain, however, is the result of some type of injury, such lifting or bending improperly, a sports injury or an automobile accident.

Other Musculoskeletal Pain
Soft-tissue rheumatic conditions can also cause pain. In these conditions, muscles, connective tissues such as tendons and ligaments, and bursae become inflamed and painful.

#Arthritis #Osteoarthritis #Rheumatoid #Arthritis #Gout #PsoriaticArthritis

More links to various forms of Arthritis
http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/alphaidx.asp?p=a_1

ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com
🌷

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Blessed, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, family, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, OA, Osteonecrosis, Osteoporosis, Rare Disease Day, Rheumatoid Arthritis, StopTheClot, Uncategorized

Nothing Is Useless

When the body is falling apart. And you feel like you have nothing of value to offer God or anyone else. 

Think again. 
Below is a post from Our Daily Bread
Nothing Is Useless June 12, 2017  

from Our Daily Bread
Read: 1 Corinthians 15:42–58 

“Nothing you do for the Lord is ever useless.” 

1 Corinthians 15:58 
‘Nothing Is Useless’

A Story of Hope and Encouragement 

In my third year battling discouragement and depression caused by limited mobility and chronic pain, I confided to a friend, “My body’s falling apart. I feel like I have nothing of value to offer God or anyone else.”
Her hand rested on mine. “Would you say it doesn’t make a difference when I greet you with a smile or listen to you? Would you tell me it’s worthless when I pray for you or offer a kind word?”
Do what you can with what you have and leave the results to God. I settled into my recliner. “Of course not.”
She frowned. “Then why are you telling yourself those lies? You do all those things for me and for others.”
I thanked God for reminding me that nothing we do for Him is useless.
In 1 Corinthians 15, Paul assures us that our bodies may be weak now but they will be “raised in power” (v. 43). Because God promises we’ll be resurrected through Christ, we can trust Him to use every offering, every small effort done for Him, to make a difference in His kingdom (v. 58).
Even when we’re physically limited, a smile, a word of encouragement, a prayer, or a display of faith during our trial can be used to minister to the diverse and interdependent body of Christ. When we serve the Lord, no job or act of love is too menial to matter.
Jesus, thank You for valuing us and using us to build up others.
Do what you can with what you have and leave the results to God.

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Eat Healthy, exercise, Inflammation, OA, Osteonecrosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Uncategorized

Burning Bone Fat for Better Bones 

Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat a key to better bone health

The study, published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, also suggests obese individuals — who often have worse bone quality — may derive even greater bone health benefits from exercising than their lean counterparts.
“One of the main clinical implications of this research is that exercise is not just good, but amazing for bone health,” said lead author Maya Styner, MD, a physician and assistant professor of endocrinology and metabolism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “In just a very short period of time, we saw that running was building bone significantly in mice.”
Although research in mice is not directly translatable to the human condition, the kinds of stem cells that produce bone and fat in mice are the same kind that produce bone and fat in humans.
In addition to its implications for obesity and bone health, Styner said the research also could help illuminate some of the factors behind bone degradation associated with conditions like diabetes, arthritis, anorexia, and the use of steroid medications.
In her patients, Styner is all too familiar with the chronic toll of osteoporosis and fractures. This new evidence shows it’s possible to use exercise to reverse some of the effects on bones.
“I see a lot of patients with poor bone health, and I always talk to them about what a dramatic effect exercise can have on bones, regardless of what the cause of their bone condition is,” said Styner. “With obesity, it seems that you get even more bone formation from exercise. Our studies of bone biomechanics show that the quality and the strength of the bone is significantly increased with exercise and even more so in the obese exercisers”
Getting to the marrow of the matter
Bone and marrow are more dynamic than you might think. Marrow, in particular, is a hub of activity, coordinating the formation of bone and cartilage while simultaneously churning out blood cells, immune cells, and cancerous cells.
Marrow also produces fat, which has a lot to do with its vaunted status in cuisines around the world. But the physiological role of bone marrow fat in the body — and even whether it is beneficial or harmful for one’s health — has remained somewhat mysterious.
Generally, marrow fat has been thought to comprise a special fat reserve that is not used to fuel energy during exercise in the same way other fat stores are used throughout the body during exercise. The new study offers evidence to the contrary.
Styner’s work also offers fundamental insights on how marrow fat forms and the impact it has on bone health. Previous studies have suggested that a higher amount of marrow fat increases the risk of fractures and other problems.
“There’s been intense interest in marrow fat because it’s highly associated with states of low bone density, but scientists still haven’t understood its physiologic purpose,” said Styner. “We know that exercise has a profound effect on fat elsewhere in the body, and we wanted to use exercise as a tool to understand the fat in the marrow.”
Vanishing fat cells
The researchers performed their experiments in two groups of mice. One group was fed a normal diet (lean mice) and the other received a high-fat diet (obese mice) starting a month after birth. When they were four months old, half the mice in each group were given a running wheel to use whenever they liked for the next six weeks. Because mice like to run, the group with access to a wheel tended to spend a lot of time exercising.
The researchers analyzed the animals’ body composition, marrow fat and bone quantity at various points. Predictably, the obese mice started with more fat cells and larger fat cells in their marrow. After exercising for six weeks, both obese and lean mice showed a significant reduction in the overall size of fat cells and the overall amount fat in the marrow. In these respects, the marrow fat of exercising obese mice looked virtually identical to the marrow fat of lean mice, even those that exercised.
Perhaps more surprising was the dramatic difference in the number of fat cells present in the marrow, which showed no change in lean mice but dropped by more than half in obese mice that exercised compared to obese mice that were sedentary. The tests also revealed that exercise improved the thickness of bone, and that this effect was particularly pronounced in obese mice.
According to Styner, all of this points to the conclusion that marrow fat can be burned off through exercise and that this process is good for bones.
“Obesity appears to increase a fat depot in the bone, and this depot behaves very much like abdominal and other fat depots,” said Styner. “Exercise is able to reduce the size of this fat depot and burn it for fuel and at the same time build stronger, larger bones.”
Setting the stage
The research leaves a few lingering mysteries. A big one is figuring out the exact relationship between burning marrow fat and building better bone. It could be that when fat cells are burned during exercise, the marrow uses the released energy to make more bone. Or, because both fat and bone cells come from parent cells known as mesenchymal stem cells, it could be that exercise somehow stimulates these stem cells to churn out more bone cells and less fat cells.
More research will be needed to parse this out. “What we can say is there’s a lot of evidence suggesting that marrow fat is being used as fuel to make more bone, rather than there being an increase in the diversion of stem cells into bone,” said Styner.
But marrow fat, being encased in bone, isn’t easy to study. The team’s new research represents a leap forward not only in understanding bone marrow fat but also in the tools to study it.
The group’s previous work relied on micro CT imaging, which requires the use of a toxic tracer to measure marrow fat. In the new study, they took advantage of UNC’s 9.4 TMRI, a sophisticated MRI machine of which there are only a few around the country. Using MRI to assess marrow fat eliminates the need for the toxic tracer and allows highly detailed imaging of living organisms.
“If we want to take this technique to the human level, we could study marrow fat in humans in a much more reliable fashion now,” said Styner. “And our work shows this is possible.”
The team also developed techniques to perform a much more detailed assessment of the number and size of fat cells within the marrow, and even examined some of the key proteins involved in the formation and reduction of bone marrow fat.
Styner is now working with collaborators to adapt these methods for studying the bone marrow dynamics that might be at work in other conditions, including anorexia and post-menopausal osteoporosis.

# Exercise 

#BoneHealth

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170518140220.htm

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Food, Inflammation, Life, OA, Osteonecrosis, Recipes, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Uncategorized, Vegetables

Zucchini and Veggie Summer Salad and Boats 

Zucchini and Veggie Summer Salad:

serves 4

*4 medium tomatoes

*1/2 bunch basil (remove leaves from stems tear it. You never really want to chop basil)

*2-3 medium zucchini (sliced into 1/4 inch rounds) or you can spiral it I do that to. 

*1/2 red onion( sliced into very thin rounds)

*1-2 ears corn (cooked and cut off the cob)

*6 asparagus spears chopped

*1 cup broccoli or cauliflower chopped optional

*1/2 orange pepper sliced thin

*1 avocado

*4-6 radishes thinly sliced

*6 tablespoons balsamic vinegar or lemon juice

*4 -5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

*1-2 cloves garlic minced

*salt and pepper to taste


Directions:

I like to cut the onions first and put in the bottom of the bowl with the balsamic vinegar to let it marinate a few minutes to take the bite out of the onion slightly i do this while I chop the rest of the ingredients
Except the avocado I always do this Last right before serving 
Combine ingredients in large bowl, add garlic, olive oil, salt and pepper to taste. WaLa!!  
Summer in a bowl!  

Excellent served over fresh garlic and olive oil pasta or along side your favorite grilled meat if your a meat eater.

#Healthy

#SummerSalad

#AntiInflammatory 
Beta-carotene and vitamin C also have anti-inflammatory properties, thereby naturally curing ailments like osteoarthritis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis, where swelling is immensely painful. 
The copper percentage in zucchini also helps in reducing the aching symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.
Maintains Optimal Health: As an outstanding source of manganese and vitamin C, zucchini is the best source of dietary fiber that will keep your body in the best shape for the long run.
 It also contains vitamin A, magnesium, folate, potassium, copper, and phosphorus . This summer squash also has a high content of omega-3 fatty acids, zinc, niacin, and protein. 
Moreover, vitamin B1, vitamin B6, vitamin B2, and calcium in zucchini assure optimal health. Zucchini is probably the best example of squash that has such a rich array of nutrients, including sugar, carbohydrates, soluble and insoluble fiber, sodium, minerals, amino acids and more. 
The folate ingredient of zucchini is highly commendable for pregnant women as well.
Promotes Men’s Health. 

Helps Keep You Disease-Free: Your overall health will surely improve if you consume zucchini regularly. It helps you prevent all kinds of diseases in a general sense. 
Studies have already declared that fiber-rich foods help to alleviate cancer conditions by washing away the cancer-causing toxins from cells in the colon. The vitamin C, folate and beta-carotene content in zucchini helps to protect these cells from the harmful chemicals that can lead to colon cancer. Beta-carotene and vitamin C also have anti-inflammatory properties, thereby naturally curing ailments like osteoarthritis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis, where swelling is immensely painful.

 The copper percentage in zucchini also helps in reducing the aching symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

Overall Cardiovascular Protection: Zucchini is rich in nutritional value, especially during the summer, when it delivers countless advantages to the body. The food ranking systems in zucchini-rich countries have declared this squash has abundant of manganese and vitamin C that helps to keep the heart strong.

During the research, most of these nutrients are shown to be effective in the prevention of diabetic heart disease and atherosclerosis. The magnesium content notably reduces the risk of heart attacks and strokes. 

In combination with potassium, magnesium also helps in reducing high blood pressure. The vitamin C and beta-carotene found in summer squash helps in preventing the oxidation of cholesterol. 
Oxidized cholesterol builds up on blood vessel walls, but these nutrients reduce the development of atherosclerosis. The vitamin folate is required by the body to eliminate an unsafe metabolic byproduct called homocysteine, which can result in heart attacks and strokse if the levels rise too high. 

Zucchini’s fiber content lowers high cholesterol levels as well, thereby helping reduce the risk of atherosclerosis and heart disease due to diabetes.

As you well know, eating enough fruits and vegetables is important, so if you include zucchini in your daily diet, you are actually keeping your body healthy, well-hydrated and toxin-free in the long run. It is undoubtedly one of the most advantageous and healthy food choices that that is easy to consume and able to be enjoyed in many different and delicious forms.

VEGETARIAN STUFFED ZUCCHINI BOATS

Serves 6
INGREDIENTS

6 small to medium zucchini squash

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 cup diced Vidalia or other sweet onion

3 medium garlic cloves minced

1 cup sweet red pepper 1/2 inch diced

1/2 cup yellow corn

1/2 cup carrot diced 

One large handful of spinach 

1/3 cup any Bean of your choice

1 cup diced Crimini mushrooms diced

1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

1/2 teaspoon dried basil

2 tablespoons fresh chopped parsley

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2/3 cup panko bread crumbs

1/3 cup rolled oats uncooked

1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese

1/4 cup grated Romano cheese

Additional grated parmesan to sprinkle over cooked squash

INSTRUCTIONS
Preheat oven to 375 degrees
Trim stem end from squash. Cut about 1/3 off the top of each squash horizontally. Then cut a small horizontal sliver from the bottom so that the squash will sit flat and not roll. Dice the tops to ½ inch dice and set aside.

Using a small paring knife, cut around inside of squash then using a melon-baller, scoop out inside until the squash resembles a canoe. Try not to cut through to the bottom.

In a large skillet or frying pan heat the oil over medium heat. Add onion and cook two minutes. Add garlic, red pepper, mushrooms and cut up zucchini tops. Mix to combine and sauté one minute. Then add other veggies cook 1 more minute. 

Remove from heat and mix in oregano, basil, parsley, salt, pepper, crumbs and both cheeses. Mix to combine.

Divide the filling between each zucchini boat and press into squash filling and pressing as you fill to hold shape.

Bake for 30 to  40 minutes uncovered. Try not to over cook, otherwise the zucchini will start to get all saggy  and the filling will fall out 

As soon as they come out of the oven, sprinkle the tops with additional Parmesan cheese and serve.

Serve 2 halves and a small salad 🥗 

Posted in Arthritis, Chronic Pain, Inflammation, Life, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Uncategorized

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