Posted in Awareness

Dealing with Joint Pain in the Pandemic

How do I deal with my knee and back pain until the orthopedic doctors start seeing patients again?

There are a variety of non-operative treatment options for pain. No one treatment is going to help everyone, and patients need to find the treatments that seem to work the best for them.

Medications I personally cannot take NSAIDS so I reach for

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is an over-the-counter option that is safe and effective for me.

For many Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) – e.g. Ibuprofen and naproxen – may also be helpful. Prescription NSAIDs are also an option to discuss with your health care provider.

Some say medical marijuana helps them. I’ve never tried it so I cannot comment.

Supplements, such as glucosamine/chondroitin, are generally safe and may be helpful in reducing some arthritic pain. Also talk to you doctor about curcumin supplements tablets .

I drink Turmeric tea aka golden milk it is a natural anti-inflammatory agent.

Exercise helps me. I’m not talking about running or walking a marathon.

Just 1-2 miles once or twice a day. Makes me feel good especially in summer. My joints love the heat.

I have a daily exercise regimen, specifically designed for me and my knee osteonecrosis osteoarthritis, and this back pain that is really an out of the blue pain.

With osteonecrosis moving is critically important for maintaining strength in muscles supporting the joints , reducing pain and it’s also great for stress.

It is important to be as active as your joints allow and find a variety of stretching and strengthening exercises that you perform daily, without increasing your pain.

A good source for exercise instruction for arthritis may be found at you ortho office maybe they can email you some ideas.

Crutches, a walker, ice/heat treatments and a knee brace may also be helpful in managing your hip and/or knee pain.

Weight Loss and Diet

The covid 19 is a little saying that explains what is happened to many since the pandemic.

And extra 19 pounds can cause the joints to really hurt.

Many patients with osteonecrosis and arthritis are carrying a few extra pounds and weight loss reduces stress across our joints.

We put 3-5X our body weight across our hip and knee joints with activity, particularly stair climbing and getting in and out of a chair. Every 10 pounds of extra weight carried results in 50 pounds of weight bearing pressure across the hips and knees!

A healthy diet is important for general health and weight loss, and some may find benefit from focusing on an “anti-inflammatory” diet. The anti-inflammatory diet is a diet which includes tomatoes, olive oil, green leafy vegetables, nuts, fatty fish, and fresh fruit, particularly blueberries, strawberries, cherries and oranges. Foods thought to cause inflammation, and to avoid, include white bread and pastries, French fries, soda, margarine and red meat.

In summary: stay active, eat healthy, maintain social distancing as instructed and maintain a positive attitude.

Please know that your orthopedic provider and all pcp ‘s are also anxious to get back to “business as usual” and help you to resolve your arthritic pain!

Check out my other posts on great recipes

Please follow like and share to get updates on my latest posts

Wishing you love, good health and a pain free day

Love

Deb

https://flexitarianforlife.wordpress.com/

http://www.ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com

Posted in Awareness

All About Knee Pain part 6 of 6

Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy is a relatively minor surgery performed with the use of a miniature camera (arthroscope). Arthroscopic knee surgery is commonly used to diagnose and treat knee pain. This surgery takes about an hour. During the procedure, an orthopedic surgeon can repair tissue and cartilage tears, or scrape and cut away bone and cartilage fragments to ease knee pain. Advances in arthroscopy have made this process more accurate and effective than ever before.

Recovery – In most cases, arthroscopy is an outpatient procedure. Patients often can return to office work within a week and to a normal lifestyle within a month or two. Physical therapy is important for recovering mobility.

Benefits – This surgery involves small incisions for the arthroscope and other tools, meaning a quicker recovery. Arthroscopy can provide relief from knee pain and improve mobility, allowing patients to return to a normal, active lifestyle with greater comfort.

Who is a candidate? – Patients with knee problems such as ACL tears, meniscus tears and cartilage wear are good candidates for arthroscopic surgery. The surgery can be performed on patients of all ages, depending on the condition of the knee.

Risks – Knee arthroscopy is a safe procedure with few complications. Risks may include swelling, stiffness, bleeding, blood clots, infection or continuing knee problems

There are three compartments to the knee. In a resurfacing, only the damaged areas are replaced.

Focal Knee Resurfacing

For the right patients, resurfacing is a great alternative to a knee replacement. This newer procedure replaces only a specific area of the knee cartilage surface. Broken down cartilage is removed and replaced with a custom-made, metal implant that is cemented to the bone.

Recovery – Patients are encouraged to walk soon after surgery. Many are able to drive after a week or two. Physical therapy is an important part of getting back mobility in your knee.

Benefits – Knee resurfacing may be the wave of the future in treating severe knee pain. It is less invasive than a knee replacement. Because less bone is cut away, patients are left with more of a “real knee.” It also can feel more natural than a knee replacement because the implant is custom-made to fit a patient’s knee. Recovery can be shorter than it is with a knee replacement.

Who is a candidate? – Knee resurfacing may be ideal for younger, more active patients. It can be effective for patients with focal cartilage defects and early to mid-stage osteoarthritis.

Risks – Possible (but rare) complications of surgery include blood clots, infection and nerve damage. Long-term complications may include continued pain, infection or a loosening of the implant.

Durability – Knee resurfacing is a new procedure and is predicted to last 10 to 15 years.

Partial knee replacement

Partial knee replacement may be an option for you if parts of your knee are free of disease or injury. This minimally invasive procedure may be possible when just one or two of the three compartments of your knee are damaged. In a partial knee replacement, cartilage and bone is shaved away and replaced with an implant in the affected compartment(s). This means a smaller incision and a shorter recovery time than with a total knee replacement.

Recovery – Patients usually can start moving the knee the day after surgery. Physical therapy is key to recovery and regaining mobility. Patients can be back to full activity in about a month. However, high-impact exercises, jogging and running are discouraged because implants have a surface that can wear.

Benefits – Compared to a full knee replacement, a partial knee replacement has a shorter recovery time, less post-operative pain, less blood loss during surgery and a smaller incision. In addition, more of the patient’s healthy bone and soft tissues are preserved, which means you could a have better range of motion and knee function than you would with a full knee replacement. Patients who have partial knee replacements also are still candidates for a full knee replacement, if needed, down the road.

Who is a candidate? – The ideal candidate has osteoarthritis that is severe (but not advanced) and whose pain can no longer be managed with conservative treatments. This is not a procedure for patients with significant deformity.

Risks – Possible (but rare) complications of surgery include blood clots, infection, nerve damage and other risks. Long-term complications may include continued pain, infection, and a failure, loosening or dislocation of the prosthesis.

Durability – Approximately 85 percent of knee implants will last 20 years.

Total knee replacement

When all of the parts of a knee need repair, total knee replacement may be the best option. This involves removing brokendown cartilage and bone and replacing it with the right artificial joint for you. This prosthesis is made of plastic and metal and provides fluid and free movement. It is attached to the bone with acrylic cement or can be press-fit, allowing bone to grow into the implant. Surgeons also perform any needed ligament repair. To work properly, the new joint needs support from the patient’s muscles and ligaments.

Total knee replacement in our aging and active culture is increasingly common. By 2030, it is estimated that more than 3 million total knee replacements will be performed each year.

Recovery – Following a total knee replacement, most patients spend only one to two days in the hospital however, many are done as an outpatient procedure. Patients can stand and move the joint the day after surgery and use a cane, walker or similar aid for several weeks. Physical therapy is crucial to restore motion to your joint. After six weeks, most patients are able to put full weight on their knee with the use of a cane. Full recovery and rehabilitation typically takes about six months. Patients are able to return to an active lifestyle, except for highimpact activities, such as running and jumping.

Benefits – Most patients experience dramatic improvement and relief from pain within weeks of surgery.

Who is a candidate? – Total knee replacement can be a good option for people with painful knee deformities, severe degenerative changes, or advanced or end-stage arthritis.

Risks – The risk of complications is rare in total knee replacement surgeries, occurring in less than 2 percent of patients. Your surgeon may prescribe blood thinners to prevent blood clots after surgery. Some patients notice some loss of motion, stiffness or pain. For a very small percentage of patients, the joint may fail. Studies have shown this is more common in obese patients.

Durability – Doctors have been performing total knee replacements since the early 1970s, and it is one of the most successful surgeries for knee arthritis. New data suggest that contemporary knee replacements may last more than 30 years. Approximately 85 percent of knee replacements done 20 years ago are still functioning well.

Posted in Awareness

All About Knee Pain Part 5 of 6

Part 5 knee

Treatments

Conservative care

Many types of knee pain can be relieved and/or resolved with conservative treatments such as:

Rest When the knee is injured or is inflamed, as in bursitis, tendonitis or arthritis, it’s important to rest the joint and avoid overuse. That may mean keeping the knee straight (extended) or in positions that limit bending.

Ice/heat Applying ice or cold packs to the knee can reduce inflammation and swelling, especially after an injury. Once swelling is gone, heat may be used to help relax and loosen tissues – although ice is the primary treatment.

Pain relievers Over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medicines can help relieve knee pain, including ibuprofen (Advil®) and naproxen (Aleve®).

Weight loss Your doctor may recommend that you lose weight to reduce pressure on your knee.

Braces In general, knee braces wrap around the knee and leg and help limit unwanted movement while supporting the knee. They are commonly used when knee ligaments are weak, and help to keep the knee from “buckling.” Braces will provide support during healing, but are not a primary treatment for arthritic degeneration.

There is a variety of braces. Functional braces are designed to support knees that have suffered an impact-related injury. Rehabilitative braces provide support when recovering from a surgery or injury. Uploading/offloading braces are used by patients with arthritis and help to stabilize the knee when standing up or sitting down

Physical therapy

Once your doctor diagnoses the cause of your knee pain, physical therapy may be the next step. Physical therapists can show you specific exercise programs that will help you recover from the injury and decrease the pain you are experiencing. They also may demonstrate low-impact stretches and exercises that can strengthen muscles in your knee, improve stability and flexibility, and reduce pressure on the joint. They can advise you on helpful lowimpact aerobic exercises, such as swimming and cycling, that won’t aggravate your knee pain. Physical therapy also is an important part of recovery after knee surgery.

Injections

I personally am not a fan of these. I personally get more pain when o have had them. And they can lead to faster break down of bone tissue and can lead to Osteonecrosis.

Steroid (or more commonly known as cortisone) shots can be placed inside the knee to reduce pain and inflammation.

Another nonsurgical procedure that can provide relief from knee pain is viscosupplementation. Administered in the doctor’s office, this treatment involves injecting a lubricant into the knee. The filler lubricates and adds cushioning to the joint, allowing bones to move more easily and reducing friction.

In some cases, relief from viscosupplementation can last for months. It can be a viable, though short-term, solution for mild to moderate osteoarthritic knee pain.

Prp injections

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy uses injections of a concentration of a patient’s own platelets to accelerate the healing of injured tendons, ligaments, muscles and joints. In this way, PRP injections use each individual patient’s own healing system to improve musculoskeletal problems. I have had this and I had a good result. Healed no but a better outcome and mobility than I had.

Posted in Awareness

Meet Brotha Anthony

This is Anthony Glover and he is a an inspiration and sets a standard that all men should measure up to.

He is the founder of Useful Hands PHX it is an outdoor program designed to empower young men while on their journey to Manhood through hands-on introductory skill training.

From Car care to cooking to pitching a tent to gardening to using a drill etc…

Anthony Glover, simply known in his community as “Brotha Anthony,” is a Phoenix, AZ native. He has made his presence felt in his community through spoken word poetry, event hosting and mentoring of young men with “Fight For Life, No Excuses” Manhood Training Program located in South Phoenix.

He is also the Program Director of “Thunderbirds On The Rise,” a mentoring program for male students of TG Barr Elementary, also located in South Phoenix.

Brotha Anthony desired to find another unique way to connect with and guide young men on their journey to Manhood, especially as it pertains to creating great use and value with their hands.

Ultimately, he envisioned Useful Hands PHX and has plans on teaching young men for many years to come.

This is a fantastic idea, So many young men today don’t have a father figure to look up to and some that do have dads maybe they don’t know all these life skills either.

I find this to be a wonderful idea that can help so many young’s men learn life skills they will always use.

Maybe you could be a volunteer or start your own

To learn more or to donate see link below

Useful Hands phx

Posted in Chronic Pain, Inflammation, Pain

Cabbage -Don’t Overlook This Inflammation Fighting Veggie

1. Lowers the Signs of Aging

Cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables contain a high amount of Vitamin C and E, which help in the production of collagen, the compound which keeps the skin elastic and wrinkle-free. Vitamin A along with Vitamin D protects the skin and gives you a youthful skin.

  1. Helps Fight Free Radicals

Cabbage is rich in antioxidants Antioxidants help fight oxidative damage caused by free radicals and prevent a whole range of ailments.

  1. Speeds Up the Recovery Process

Cabbage leaves are used as a poultice. Using these leaves can ease skin eruptions caused by acne, psoriasis, eczema, ulcers, wounds,insect bites and rashes. Grated leaves or blended leaves can be applied directly over the affected area with some dressing for faster healing.

  1. Improves Complexion

Cabbage can also help acne and other skin conditions. Some steamed cabbage leaves compressed in a cotton cloth can be placed on the affected area overnight for best results. The levels of potassium and Vitamin A also improve complexion.

  1. May Provide Relief From Allergies

Cabbages and other cruciferous vegetables of its kind contain anti-inflammatory properties. They are rich in sulforaphane and glutamine which are powerful anti-inflammatory agents. Regular consumption can ease health conditions worsened by inflammation such as allergies, irritation, fever, joint pain and skin disorders.

  1. May Prevent Cancer

The Brassica vegetables such as cabbage contain a significant amount of glucosinolates that have strong anti-cancer properties. These compounds scavenge free radicals which are bad for health and contribute to cancers of different kinds. Red cabbages are particularly loaded with compounds such as sinigrin, lupeol and sulforaphane with anti-cancer properties.

  1. Good for the Digestive Tract

Cabbage is high in fiber, which makes it healthy for the digestive tract. Eating cabbage can provide relief from constipation. This is very effective in treating constipation and related gastrointestinal disorders.

  1. Promotes Weight Loss

As cabbage is loaded with essential nutrients and contains almost no calories or fats, hence it is perfect for people who are on a weight loss diet. If you don’t like to eat cabbage in the form of vegetable, you can drink cabbage juice.

  1. Protects the Eye

Vitamin A which is an essential nutrient for our eyes is present in cabbage and helps maintain good vision. The beta-carotene, an antioxidant present in cabbage is also helpful in preventing macular degeneration and delay the onset of cataracts.

  1. Improves the Health of Hair

Cabbage being rich in many of the essential nutrients helps maintain healthy hair and prevents hair fall. It also prevents dry hair and protects the hair strands from physical damage. Vitamin C which is found in cabbage is essential for the production of the protein keratin which primarily makes up the hair and nails in the body.

  1. Improves the Health of the Heart

Red cabbages are rich in compounds called anthocyanins which give them their characteristic purple color. Studieshave shown a link between diet consisting of foods rich in these compounds and lowering of heart disease. Along with this, cabbages are also good sources of potassium and calcium essential for healthy functioning of the heart.

  1. Good for the Brain

Cabbage is also brain food. Vitamin K and anthocyanins in cabbage promote mental function and focus. Vitamin K is also important to protect the nerve cells from damage and prevent degenerative diseases. Cabbage is also a rich source of iodine which is an essential nutrient for the brain.

  1. Helps Strengthen the Bones

Cabbages are abundant sources of nutrients that are necessary for building strong bones. They are loaded with calcium, magnesium, and potassium which are all essential for strengthening the bones. Eating cabbage may also help in warding off diseases such as osteoporosis.

  1. Regulates Blood Pressure

Red cabbage is an abundant source of anthocyanins which is known to lower blood pressure. Eating cabbage regularly helps maintain normal blood pressure and decreases the risk of heart diseases.

  1. Good for Diabetic Patients

The potassium present in cabbage is not only good for lowering blood pressure but helps maintain blood sugar levels. It also improves mental well being by reducing stress and anxiety.

16. Boosts Immunity

Being loaded with Vitamin C and antioxidants, cabbage helps boost immunity. It supports the immune system and fights off various diseases.

17. Helps Treat Peptic Ulcer

The presence of anti-inflammation compounds such as glucosinolates helps reduce peptic ulcers in the stomach. Cabbage juice is a remedy for ulcers. It eases the inflammation in the stomach lining and speeds up the recovery process.

 

Tips to Select and Store Cabbage

To get the most out of cabbage, you must first choose the best ones from the market. Here’s how to pick good cabbages:

  • Cabbages are available all year round in supermarkets. Look for ones that are large, dense, and firm. They should have colorful leaves that are crisp and shiny without bruises, blemishes, or insect bites. They must also feel heavy for their size.
  • Tightly packed leaves at the bottom of the cabbage indicate freshness. If they are starting to separate from its stem, the cabbage is old. Don’t buy it if it seems old.
  • Shredded cabbage or which is already cut in half should be avoided as they would have lost their Vitamin C content.
  • To retain their freshness and Vitamin C level, it’s essential to keep them cold in a refrigerator.
  • Cabbages that are stored in plastic bags in a refrigerator can be stored for a week or two.
  • Cabbages with loose leaves will not last too long and are best stored in a cool dark place.
  • In case you need half a cabbage, the other half should be wrapped in a plastic bag with some water sprinkled on the cut side and refrigerated.
  • Another way to store cabbage effectively is to freeze it. First, shred the cabbage and blanch the shreds for two minutes. Filter out and freeze the shreds in an airtight container.

How to Cook Cabbage

You can include cabbage in soups, salads, and casseroles. It can be boiled, fried, stuffed, steamed or even eaten raw. Here are some healthy ways to cook cabbages:

  • A simple cabbage dish can be made by boiling some water and adding chopped cabbage to it. Add sugar and sprinkle some meat seasoning and simmer for 35 minutes.
  • Grated cabbage can be cooked in milk for 3 to 4 minutes and seasoned with pepper and salt.
  • A low-calorie cabbage dish involves cooking cabbage leaves in a mixture of mustard and cucumber juice. Steamed cabbage and other vegetables can be diced and added to it. Cook until the cabbage is a little crispy.
  • Shred red cabbage into fine pieces and add sliced apples and a bit of vinegar. Cook for 1 minute.
  • To make stuffed cabbage rolls, remove the core and stuff it with vegetables of your choice. Cook for 3 minutes until it is soft and serve with a spicy sauce.
  • For a quick and delicious dish, stir-fry sliced cabbage with ginger, garlic, chillies and a bit of soy sauce.

Are There Any Side Effects of Eating Cabbage?

Cabbages also have a few side effects like any other vegetable, some of them include:

  • Foodborne illnesses
  • Bloating
  • Goitre
  • Flatulence
  • Colic in babies

FAQs

  1. What Are the Different Varieties of Cabbage?

There are 7 varieties of cabbage – red cabbage, Choy sum, Bok choy, Savoy cabbage, Napa cabbage, Cannonball cabbage, January king cabbage.

 

2. Apply to sore joints.

You can place a leaf of cabbage on a sore joint and it will help pull out the inflammation, I have done this and felt the benefits.

 

**If Pregnant talk to your doctor about eating cabbage too often**

 

The information is provided on this website is for entertainment and general information purposes only.

While I aim to provide up-to-date information, I make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose.

You are reading of the information on this website is of your own free will and you are taking the provided information at your own risk.

The information we provide is for entertainment purposes only. I am  not providing medical, legal or other professional advice.  And will not be liable for anything you choose to do on your own. In fact I always suggest you talk to your own doctor before trying anything.

Posted in Awareness

All about Knee pain part 4 of 6

 

Part 4 knees

How is knee pain diagnosed?

 

When diagnosing any knee pain, the physician will take your medical history and perform a thorough physical examination.

To help your doctor best understand your knee pain, you’ll need to provide the following information:

• A description of your knee pain (aching, tenderness, burning or swelling)

• Where the pain is located and when it occurs

• When the pain started (and if it is the result of an injury or accident)

• Anything that makes the pain worse or better

Your doctor also may order imaging tests to view the joint, which may include the following:

X-rays – An X-ray can show if there are certain problems, such as deterioration or fracture, within your knee.

MRI – In some cases, your doctors may order a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. An MRI provides significantly more detail about the soft tissues in your knee, such as the cartilage on the surface of the bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles.

CT scan – Computerized tomography scans combine X-ray views from multiple angles, creating a two- or three-dimensional, cross-sectional image. These images show “slices” of bone and soft tissue.

 

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Posted in Awareness

All About Our Knees Part 3 of 6

Part 3 knee

Knee injuries can be the result of sports, falls or trauma. They typically involve the ligaments that hold two of the bones of the knee – the femur and tibia – together. Here are some of the most common types:

Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are among the most common and dreaded sports injuries. Your ACL keeps your knee from moving too far out of position. Changing directions too quickly or hyperextending the knee can tear the ACL. Women are more prone to tearing the ACL. Surgery is often necessary to repair damage to an ACL.

A stretch or tear of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is typically caused by a hit or blow to the outer knee. Pain is felt along the inner knee. Bracing and conservative treatment, such as rest and physical therapy, are usually sufficient to heal these injuries.

The meniscus is crescent-shaped cartilage between your thigh bone (femur) and lower leg bone (tibia). You have two of these cushions in each of your knees, inner (medial) and outer (lateral). The medial one is most often injured. These injuries often are caused by sudden twisting, resulting in swelling, pain and locking of the knee. Arthroscopic surgery may be necessary to remove the torn fragment when conservative treatment does not help.

Posted in Awareness

All About Our Knees Part 2

Types of Pain

What are the different types of knee pain?

Knee pain has many causes. Some of the most common include:

Osteoarthritis

Arthritis is a chronic condition that causes joint inflammation. Symptoms include redness, warmth, swelling, tenderness and pain. Up to 30 percent of the population may have knee osteoarthritis, or “wear and tear” arthritis. This is the gradual breakdown of the cartilage in the knee. Also called degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis usually develops over years and often is found in patients who have had a knee infection or injury and those who are overweight.

As cartilage wears away, the bones around it can grow thicker and develop bony spurs. This can lead to increased friction between the bones and disrupted movement in your knee. This also can lead to problems with the synovium, a membrane in your knee that produces a liquid to keep your cartilage slippery. This membrane can become inflamed and make too much fluid. This results in swelling, or “water on the knee.” In the most severe cases, the knee can become deformed as the continued friction wears away the bone.

Common symptoms of osteoarthritis include pain, stiffness, tenderness, a limited range of motion and a grating sensation when you bend your knee. The pain is usually worse after activity.

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis can affect joints on both sides of the body (both knees, both hands and/or both wrists). In rheumatoid arthritis, your body’s cells attack your own tissues. While in most people symptoms develop gradually over years, they can appear rapidly. Rheumatoid arthritis affects three to five times more women than men and often presents between the ages of 20 and 50.

Rheumatoid arthritis may be related to a combination of abnormal immunity and genetic, environmental and hormonal factors. Over time, rheumatoid arthritis can cause cartilage to wear away, swelling in the synovium, and excess fluid in the knee. In later stages, bones can rub against each other.

Bursitis

Bursitis is the inflammation of any of the fluid-filled sacs (bursae) protecting the body’s joints. This is usually caused by repetitive motions or by a stress such as kneeling. Sometimes, a sudden injury can cause bursitis.

Tendonitis

The tendons – rope-like tissues connecting muscles to bone at the knee and other joints – can become painfully inflamed by repetitive and strenuous movement. Tendonitis is a common sports injury, caused by overuse of the same parts of the body. Patellar tendinitis, or “jumper’s knee,” is an inflammation or irritation of the tendon between the knee cap and the shin bone.

Baker’s cyst

A lump behind your knee could be a Baker’s cyst. A Baker’s cyst, also called a popliteal cyst, is a fluid-filled pocket that causes swelling and tightness behind the knee. Often, it is not painful. A Baker’s cyst is typically associated with arthritis or a cartilage tear, conditions that can cause your knee to produce too much fluid. The key to treatment is to find the underlying cause of the fluid accumulating in the Baker’s cyst.

Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS)

Knee pain or discomfort while walking up and down stairs, jumping or squatting may be symptoms of patellofemoral pain syndrome. This common knee problem is felt toward the front of the knee. It can cause a grinding sensation when bending or straightening your leg, and can cause your knee to occasionally buckle. Sometimes called “runner’s knee,” patellofemoral pain syndrome may be caused by a kneecap that is not aligned properly, overuse, injury, excess weight or when the cartilage in the knee cap is worn significantly.

Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis

Osteonecrosis of the knee (also known as avascular necrosis) is a painful condition that occurs when the blood supply to a section of bone in the femur (thighbone) or tibia (shinbone) is disrupted. The pain varies from no pain to severe hot pain. Like bathe feeling of being hit in knee with a hot iron or sharp stabbing lightening bolt pain. Treatment can vary depending on stage from Prp injections to Total Knee Replacement.

SPONK Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the knee comes on suddenly.

Posted in Awareness

All About Our Knees Part 1 of a 6 part series.

About the knee 1 of 6

Did you know that your knee is the largest joint in your body. Its a really amazing and complex mechanism made of bone, cartilage and ligaments. The cartilage in your knee acts as a cushion and gliding surface. So the knee can move freely.

When the knee is healthy, the cartilage keeps the bones in the joint from rubbing together. However, when the joint is affected by arthritis, the bones make contact and cause mild or severe pain.

Injuries, as well as aging and degenerative conditions such as arthritis, osteoarthritis can cause the cartilage to break down.

Things like osteonecrosis of the knee (also known as avascular necrosis) is a painful condition that occurs when the blood supply to a section of bone in the femur (thighbone) or tibia (shinbone) is disrupted. And eventually can lead to severe osteoarthritis and even joint collapse.

Knee pain can affect every step you take. From playing sports to climbing steps, knee pain is difficult to ignore.

Some home remedies may help temporarily, but if you have chronic pain or symptoms such as swollen or red joints, it’s time to see a doctor.

I am not a fan of steroid injections or corticosteroids period as they can lead to Osteonecrosis.

And in my opinion doctors use these way too much for me. It seems like the go to drug for everything.

Because it helps inflammation but When prescribed in doses that exceed your body’s usual levels, corticosteroids suppress inflammation. This can reduce the signs and symptoms of inflammatory conditions, such as arthritis and asthma.

But they also have side effects like

What side effects can corticosteroids cause?

  • Elevated pressure in the eyes (glaucoma)
  • Fluid retention, causing swelling in your lower legs.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Problems with mood swings, memory and behavior and other psychological effects, such as confusion or delirium. Just to name a few.
Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Patient Leader, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards, WEGOHealthAwards2020

I Am A Nominee In The WEGOHealth Awards 2020

I am so honored to share that I am a nominee in the WEGOHealth Awards for Best In Show – Community and Patient Leader Hero

#WEGOHealthChat #WEGOHealthAwards #PatientLeader #Osteoarthritis #Osteonecrosis #Grateful www,ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com and  https://avascularnecrosiseducation.com

 

My WEGOHealth Profile Link    Deborah Andio WEGOHealth Profile Link

Voting will begin in July and link will be posted then to vote.

Until then if you wish to nominate me or read about WEGOHealth or take the time to nominate other amazing hardworking Advocates please go to link below

WEGOHealthAwards Vote – Review Nominees – How It Works -The Judges

 

My Nominations

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Posted in Awareness

Happiness In Daily Meditation

If there is one thing common in all of us, it is the urge to be happy and have and enjoy a satisfied in life. Whether a crying baby, an insecure teenager, or a responsible family person, we all seek something that would comfort us especially when under stress.

But the question is: Are we looking for happiness in the right place?

A partner, a new home,car, fame,vacation, money, jewelry material things are nice but the won’t make you “happy”

It’s a quick fix that doesn’t last long.

Cars break down, Bills roll along and there goes the money, that dream vacation seemed like a lifetime ago.

The real source of happiness lies in the clarity of our thoughts.

External factors can only be pleasurable as long as we are happy from the inside.

According to Buddha, meditation trains the mind to “not dwell in the past or contemplate about the future.” It lets the mind settle in the ‘now’ and allows us to see the beauty of the present. Before you read on, here is a link to a 3 minute exercise to try.

It is a science-based, comprehensive exercises will not only help you cultivate a sense of inner peace throughout your daily life but will also give you the tools to enhance the mindfulness of your clients, students or employees.

mindfulness-exercises

You can download their free PDF here

Meditation establishes a secure connection between our internal and external worlds.

It awakens the body and benefits all aspects of the conscious and subconscious layers of the mind.

Out of the numerous perks that meditation gives, a few are listed below.

More Fitness

More Focus

More Happiness

More Peace

More Clarity

More Immunity and so many more benefits

To read more click on provided link PositivePsychology

Posted in Awareness

Dealing with Re-Entry Anxiety

When COVID-19 lockdowns were first instituted, it felt, for so many people, unthinkable to have to stay home nearly 24/7.

Except for food and essentials , I also shopped for my mother in law. At first I just went about my business no mask but then when cases added up day to day I started wearing a mask.

I find myself more anxious with a mask on, harder to get good breaths which also is not good for us.

But right now we are suppose to wear them oof in stores , etc

I don’t understand why people wear mask and gloves in the car when they are alone but that’s a topic for a different day.

On occasion people like me going out also felt equally strange and nerve-wracking. I’m not only shopping for us but others as well.

But I did get more comfortable after a few weeks.

Now here we are coming the Re-entry phase everything is open people are everywhere some with masks some without.

The people I talk to have several fears , but to me I am hearing about two distinct types of re-entry anxiety.

Some people are anxious because they have a “lurking fear” of catching or spreading covid19 while others have stopped socializing and are finding it difficult to resume.

A little bit of anxiety can motivate you to follow public-health guidance like social distancing and wearing a mask where it’s required .

But when anxiety starts to interfere with your day-to-day life, it may be a problem. If you’re struggling to find the right balance, try these expert-backed tips for combating re-entry anxiety.

Take baby steps

Exposure therapy“—or safely confronting sources of fear—is the gold-standard treatment for many fear and anxiety disorders. The same tactic may help with re-entry anxiety, says Dr. Ryan Sultan, an assistant professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University’s Irving Medical Center in New York City.

“Don’t go from staying locked in your apartment to taking the subway,” Sultan says. Instead, set progressive small goals that will get you closer to behavior you find scary. For example, you could start with a walk in the park alone, then try chatting with a friend from your window and finally go for a walk together.

If you do feel yourself getting pulled into an anxiety spiral, focus on your breathing. “The simplest way to pull yourself back from that anxiety is to really concentrate on taking controlled, slow, deep breaths,” Sultan says.

Start soon

“Social isolation absolutely has short term mental-health impacts,” Sultan says. “But it potentially also has long-term impacts, and they’re directly proportional to the duration. The longer people avoid things that are making them anxious, the harder they will be to overcome.”

That does not mean you should rush out and socialize just like you did before coronavirus. (Large social gatherings are still not condoned by health experts, and most recommend meeting up outdoors.) But think about what you can do safely right now—perhaps sitting with a friend in your backyard while wearing masks and staying six feet apart—and take steps to do it sooner rather than later.

But think long-term

Sultan says he’s seen multiple patients who are remaining more isolated than necessary because of re-entry anxiety. He asks them a simple question: “Is this the life that you want to live indefinitely?”

Almost invariably, he says, people realize they “miss being outside, seeing their friends, living their life.” Having that moment of realization can motivate people to start taking small steps back toward normal, Sultan says.

Be wary of crutches

Brown says it’s easy for recommended public-health practices, like washing your hands regularly, to spiral into “safety behaviors” that, consciously or subconsciously, you rely on to keep anxiety at bay. Be honest about how these safety behaviors are affecting you. If wiping down your groceries “takes you five minutes and it really helps you,” it’s probably not a big deal, even if it’s not strictly recommended, Brown says. But if you’re spending hours a day cleaning your home, that could be a bigger issue. “It’s never really up to me to decide, ‘Is this behavior a problem?’” Brown says. Ask yourself, “Is it getting in the way of the life you want to be living?”

Recruit a Buddy

Like most behavior changes, quelling re-entry anxiety is easier with a buddy who can both support you and hold you accountable, Brown says.

Similarly, if someone in your life is struggling with re-entry anxiety, try to be their partner through it, Sultan says. “Ask them, ‘What would make you feel more comfortable doing this? Is there something I can do that would help you with that? What’s something you would feel comfortable with us doing?’”

If you find yourself still struggling and don’t know what to do you can also call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s hotline 24/7 at 1-800-662-4357.

They can refer you to a professional to speak with.

Posted in Awareness

Arthritis Pain Do’s and Don’ts

Arthritis pain:

The Do’s and The don’ts

Will physical activity reduce or increase your arthritis pain? Get tips on exercise and other common concerns when coping with arthritis symptoms and arthritis pain.

Arthritis is a leading cause of pain and disability worldwide. You can find plenty of advice about easing the pain of arthritis and other conditions with exercise, medication and stress reduction. How do you know what will work for you?

Here are some do’s and don’ts to help you figure it out

Basics

Whatever your condition, it will be easier to stay ahead of your pain if you:

• Learn all you can about your condition, including what type of arthritis you have and whether any of your joints are already damaged

• Enlist your doctor, friends and family in managing your pain

• Tell your doctor if your pain changes

Everyday routines

Pay attention to your joints, whether sitting, standing or engaging in activity. When we have pain the last thing we want to do is move but often what we should be doing.

• Keep your joints moving. Do daily, gentle stretches that move your joints through their full range of motion.

• Use good posture. A physical therapist can show you how to sit, stand and move correctly.

• Know your limits. Balance activity and rest, and don’t overdo it.

In addition, lifestyle changes are important for easing pain.

• Manage weight. Being overweight can increase complications of arthritis and contribute to more arthritis pain. Making incremental, permanent lifestyle changes resulting in gradual weight loss is often the most effective method of weight management.

• Quit smoking. If you smoke stop. It’s not that hard , I quit smoking and so can you. Smoking causes stress on connective tissues, which can increase arthritis pain.Smoking also slows down the healing process as well as it’s a nasty stinky habit.

Exercise

When you have arthritis, movement can decrease your pain and stiffness, improve your range of motion, strengthen your muscles, and increase your endurance.

What to do

Choose the right kinds of activities those that build the muscles around your joints but don’t damage the joints themselves. A physical or occupational therapist can help you develop an exercise program that’s right for you.

Don’t just go start jogging if you have knee problems or lifting weights if you have back and joint issues.

Always consult your doctor before doing anything!!

Once you get the ok.

Focus on stretching, range-of-motion exercises and gradual progressive strength training. Include low-impact aerobic exercise, such as walking, cycling or water exercises, to improve your mood and help control your weight.

What to avoid

Avoid activities that involve high impact and repetitive motion, such as:

• Running

• Jumping

• Tennis

• High-impact aerobics

• Repeating the same movement, such as a tennis serve, again and again

Medications

Many types of medications are available for arthritis pain relief. Most are relatively safe, but no medication is completely free of side effects. Talk with your doctor to formulate a medication plan for your specific pain symptoms.

What to do

Over-the-counter pain medications, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen sodium (Aleve) can help relieve occasional pain triggered by activity your muscles and joints aren’t used to — such as gardening after a winter indoors. But not everyone can take certain medications again talk to your doctor.

Cream containing capsaicin may be applied to skin over a painful joint to relieve pain, do not use if you have a scratch, cut or open wound. Use alone or with oral medication.

Consult your doctor if over-the-counter medications don’t relieve your pain.

What to avoid

• Overtreatment. Talk with your doctor if you find yourself using over-the-counter pain relievers regularly.

• Undertreatment. Don’t try to ignore severe and prolonged arthritis pain. You might have joint inflammation or damage requiring daily medication.

• Focusing only on pain. Depression is more common in people with arthritis. Doctors have found that treating depression with antidepressants and other therapies reduces not only depression symptoms but also arthritis pain.

Physical and emotional integration

It’s no surprise that arthritis pain has a negative effect on your mood. If everyday activities make you hurt, you’re bound to feel discouraged. But when these normal feelings escalate to create a constant refrain of fearful, hopeless thoughts, your pain can actually get worse and harder to manage.

What to do

Therapies that interrupt destructive mind-body interactions include:

• Cognitive behavioral therapy. This well-studied, effective combination of talk therapy and behavior modification helps you identify — and break — cycles of self-defeating thoughts and actions.

• Relaxation therapy. Meditating, doing yoga, deep breathing, listening to music, being in nature, writing in a journal do whatever helps you relax. There’s no downside to relaxation, and it can help ease pain.

• Acupuncture. Some people get pain relief through acupuncture treatments, when a trained acupuncturist inserts hair-thin needles at specific points on your body. It can take several weeks before you notice improvement.

• Heat and cold. Use of heat, such as applying heating pads to aching joints, taking hot baths or showers, or immersing painful joints in warm paraffin wax, can help relieve pain temporarily. Be careful not to burn yourself. Use heating pads for no more than 20 minutes at a time.
Use of cold, such as applying ice packs to sore muscles, can relieve pain and inflammation after strenuous exercise.

• Massage. Massage might improve pain and stiffness temporarily. Make sure your massage therapist knows where your arthritis affects you.

What to avoid

• Smoking. If you’re addicted to tobacco, you might use it as an emotional coping tool. But it’s counterproductive: Toxins in smoke cause stress on connective tissue, leading to more joint problems.

• A negative attitude. Negative thoughts are self-perpetuating. As long as you dwell on them, they escalate, which can increase your pain and risk of disability. Instead, distract yourself with activities you enjoy, spend time with people who support you and consider talking to a therapist.

Wishing you a pain free day

Deb

Posted in Gardening

Homegrown

 

Just like meditation gardening is an age-old practice that engages the body, stimulates the mind, and uplifts the spirit.

Gardening and just getting my hands in the dirt are relaxing for me.

I feel connected to the earth more, and its as if my soul is just happier, I feel more balanced, its hard to explain but let’s say I really feel great when I am planting and playing in dirt.

I don’t always get to play in the dirt because I’m in an apartment. So I often have a container garden ,small raised garden just to feel and have it look more alive and pretty and I will plant flowers out at my parents grave as well as other family members that have passed on.

My husband helps me a lot at the cemeteries because with my bone issues and knee problems I cannot even kneel on my one knee.

At some point we plan on getting a house again, we’d love 1-3 acres in the country preferably, my husband also loves gardening ,planting, lawn work , being outside.

Gardening has been shown to reduce stress and anxiety,lower blood pressure and  that can help ward off diseases associated with inactivity, it can keep also your mind sharp and happy, and can help you sleep better at night. And save you money at the grocery store.

So now imagine the added benefits of planting a small medicinal herb garden as well, when you’re growing your own herbs for your own herbal remedies. The benefits of gardening then become limitless!

We Always Loved Planning Our Garden

When planting outdoors, it’s important to consider a few factors beforehand:

  • Will you be planting directly into the ground or will you use raised garden or containers?
  • What is your soil like? Does it need to be amended? Will your herbs have good drainage?
  • At what angle and at what time of day does the sun hit?
  • What is the hardiness zone in your growing area? Will your plants thrive in your climate?
  • How often will your herbs need watering? Who can water for you if you’re out of town?

Before getting your hands dirty, consider the size and space you have make a few sketches, keeping in mind how tall or wide a plant will grow once it’s in full bloom. (For example, plants in the mint family love to spread, so make sure they have enough room to grow.)

Make sure you plant for your climate.

If you’re enthusiastic about medicinal herbs, you may be tempted to jump right in and plant a whole garden at once.  If so, more power to you! But really start out smaller, if you’re new to herb gardening, it’s always smart to start slowly with just a few plants to get started. That gives you some room for error, so you can study how much light they’re getting, the soil, and how much watering needs done. Be smart an plan.

And having a fruit and veggie garden is also a fantastic way to eat cleaner, healthier and save money while enjoying the benefits of getting your hands dirty.

“The glory of gardening: hands in the dirt, head in the sun, heart with nature. To nurture a garden is to feed not just the body, but the soul.” — Alfred Austin

Planting your herbs

Healthy plants are born from healthy soil and healthy seeds. If you notice that your soil shows no signs of growth, moisture, or earthworms, you may have to amend it with some organic compost and well-composted manure before planting.

Manure is Mother Nature’s ultimate fertilizer, but sometimes it can make the soil dense and clumpy. Don’t be afraid to add a little sand to your mixture to help encourage good drainage. Herbs don’t like wet feet!

Recommend Strictly Medicinal SeedsFedco Seeds, and Seed Savers for their vast selections and sustainable practices.

Herbs are usually ready to plant once the threat of frost has passed. Once you are ready to plant your seeds, prepare your soil beds with a light raking, making sure to level the soil and remove any rocks or pebbles larger than a gum ball. Then, using your thumb or the handle of a spade or a rake, indent the soil with small holes, spaced to account for their growth. For smaller herbs, 2” spacing between seeds generally works, but for sprawling plants like mints, you’ll likely need more space. Make sure to ask your gardening store specialist or research online ahead of time for optimal results. Then, cover the seeds with a light coating of soil and water them. You can expect sprouts within a couple of weeks.

Most herbs—but certainly not all—prefer 6-8 hours of sunshine per day and well-drained, slightly alkaline soils. Oftentimes, more sunshine results in a higher concentration of essential oils within the herb, making some medicinal herbs more potent. While many herbs prefer the conditions of a dry, Mediterranean climate during the growing season, there are others that thrive in the cool, shady forests, sometimes in acidic soils. Make sure to research which plants are ideal for your garden before you start.

 

garden

 

Best plants for your garden

Every garden has its own unique conditions. Below, is a link to a chart with some veggie plants and when to plant.

Plant chart  

 

Also of favorite medicinal plants to get you started on the right foot, but make sure to make your herb garden your own.

But remember herbs can be dangerous, so before you try them medically talk to your Doctor and an Herbalist or Naturopath because interactions can occur.

Planting your herb garden

Herb Chart

And Please Do NOT Use pesticides !