Posted in Awareness

Working and Studying from Home When You Live With Arthritis

Working and Studying from Home When You Live With Arthritis

When you get into a car to drive it for the first time, what do you do? You make sure you adjust the seat so you can reach the gas and brake pedals, you adjust rear view and side mirrors see the road easily

We do this to make driving safer and feel more comfortable. When you work from home and or go to school at home we need to make adjustments so we can be comfortable. Especially if living with joint pain.

Tips for Arranging a Healthy Work – Study Space

Working or studying from home during the coronavirus pandemic can put new strains on your joints. Use these expert tips to adjust any workspace to fit your needs.

Being still for long periods and doing repetitive work tasks that fatigue the same muscles over and over can strain the neck, shoulders, back, hands and wrists, and even the hips knees and legs. Here’s how we can adjust our work or study space help to avoid strain.

Move often – Get up and walk around every 20 to 30 minutes and make a habit of adjusting your position frequently. “Shifting positions and moving around are the best ways to combat pain, stiffness and fatigue,” I try to every 20-30 minutes stand up stretch and walk or march in place for 3-5 minutes.

Place your computer monitor so you don’t have to look up – Tilting your head to view a too-high screen strains the neck. Eyes should be level with the top of the screen (oversize monitors are exceptions). The center should be 15 degrees below your line of sight and approximately an arm’s length away. 

Stop bending your neck to text – Tilting your head down leads to text neck, its from leaning forward to long this can cause shoulder and neck pain and headaches. So, extend that phone out in front of you

Place your feet firmly on the floor – Use a footrest if your feet don’t touch the floor. 

Support your arms – Be sure your chair’s armrests are adjustable. Set them so your upper and lower arm form a 90-degree angle and you can keep your wrists straight and fingers relaxed.

Keep your main work and study essentials within arm’s reach – Your books, pens, phone, planner, and whatever other tools you use many times during the day should be within arm’s reach. This stops you from leaning forward or contorting your body into awkward postures to reach them. 

Find the right size chair – You should have at least a one-inch gap between the edge of the seat and the backs of your knees when sitting back in the chair. Its seat should be at least an inch wider than your hips and thighs. The chair’s back should be wide enough for your back, but not so wide it restricts arm movements. Try before you buy. Visit stores and sit in many chairs before selecting one.

Pick a chair that swivels and rolls – Choose a swivel chair with a five-point base for stability and wheels for ease of movement.

Raise your laptop – Laptop risers help bring the screen closer to eye level. You’ll want a separate keyboard that can be at the proper height for that task.

Don’t work or study in bed – Not only will this wreak havoc on your posture and increase your risk for joint and back pain, it can also interfere with your sleep.

Stretch Often and Take a Break Every Hour Frequent breaks are crucial in this time. Take a break every hour to give you the mental refocus needed to complete your tasks.

Stretching is encouraged to increase blood flow, decrease stiff muscles, reset postural habits and prevent chronic issues like back pain. See in references below.

Use a headset – This will help you bypass the stress to the neck and shoulders that can come from repeatedly reaching for the phone or cradling it between the ear and shoulder.  

Try ergonomic keyboards and mice – These are designed to keep hands and forearms in a more neutral position. Vertical mice, for example, orient and support your hand in an upright, neutral position. They may be useful if you have carpal tunnel syndrome – a compression of the carpal nerve in the wrist that may sometimes be caused by repetitive hand and finger motions

References

https://www.bannerhealth.com/healthcareblog/better-me/tips-to-avoid-joint-pain-while-working-from-home

Posted in Advocate, Awareness, Bone Health

VIM Pain Mgmt App from The Arthritis Foundation

This is a really good app, it’s new released by the arthritis foundation just a couple weeks ago. 

It’s a great way to connect with others that understand what it’s like to live with pain. 

It provides tips to help ease the stress and anxiety that come with chronic pain. 

Discusses various treatments from diet to meditation, to acupuncture to prp and stem cell injections to joint replacement .

The app tries to help those living in pain have options to have a better quality of life. It helps track your pain so you can discuss this with your doctor or surgeon.

It also gives you ways to register to get connected with National and at Some point Local connect groups in your area . All this is free. Ypu can even link to the podcast. 

I am the Facilitator for the Boardman Ohio LIVE Yes Connect. I try to provide support, and patient education via information as well as guest speakers as well as group interaction. 

Right now we are on zoom, but will be at some point back face to face as well as remain on zoom also. I think zoom is good because you can attend right from your hone or work or pulled over in your can. 

That’s why I volunteer for the Arthritis Foundation, they provide so much to so many. 

Give it a try…. one of the best apps I have. 

If you use it. Use the same email as your arthritis.org email for Live Yes Connect. That way you can be up to date and linked to all great things the AF has to offer in one easy app. 

Wishing you all a pain free day

Deb

Posted in Arthritis, Chronic Pain, Pain

Not All Pain is Created Equal

Not All Pain is Created Equal

When we hear the word arthritis, we think of our grandparents talking about their joint aches. We had no idea it could happen to children and people of all ages.

There are more than 100 types of arthritis and related diseases, and not all arthritis pain is alike. It can originate in different areas of our body, triggering chemical and electrical signals that move from the area of pain or injury up to brain and back to let us know that hurt

I have a high tolerance for pain so when I am hurting, I know it’s bad. Everyone’s threshold and tolerance for pain is unique. Then, there are days I bump my hand or arm and I see stars. I just don’t understand it….

Living and coping with chronic pain can be the hardest part of living with a joint disease. It can disrupt every part of our life and many parts of your life can also affect your pain.

Facts on Pain

  • As many as 75 percent of those 65 and older report persistent pain from arthritis and other chronic conditions.
  • Almost four out of five older adults have multiple chronic conditions besides arthritis, like diabetes, heart disease and obesity. And the combination can heighten pain and discomfort.
  • Women are more likely to develop chronic pain and often feel pain more intensely than men.
  • In the United States, 23% of all adults—over 54 million people—have arthritis. About 24 million adults are limited in their activities from arthritis, and more than 1 in 4 adults with arthritis report severe joint pain

National Prevalence

  • From 2013–2015, an estimated 54.4 million US adults (22.7%) annually had ever been told by a doctor that they had some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia. Learn more about national arthritis statistics.
  •  

Throughout September, I want to help bring attention to living with chronic pain and the suffering arthritis frequently causes. Let your family and friends know it’s Pain Awareness Month and ask them to help spread the word about how important it is to find more effective treatments and a cure for all forms of joint pain and arthritis.

Most of all, make sure you take care of yourself.

Tips on taking care of yourself and living with arthritis

References

Managing a flare – Arthritis Foundation- https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/managing-pain/pain-relief-solutions/tips-for-managing-an-arthritis-flare

Exercise and kids with JA – https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/physical-activity/getting-started/best-exercises-for-children-with-ja

Arthritis , Autoimmune and Rheumatology Research Cure Arthritis https://curearthritis.org/arthritis-research

Posted in Awareness

All About Our Knees Part 3 of 6

Part 3 knee

Knee injuries can be the result of sports, falls or trauma. They typically involve the ligaments that hold two of the bones of the knee – the femur and tibia – together. Here are some of the most common types:

Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are among the most common and dreaded sports injuries. Your ACL keeps your knee from moving too far out of position. Changing directions too quickly or hyperextending the knee can tear the ACL. Women are more prone to tearing the ACL. Surgery is often necessary to repair damage to an ACL.

A stretch or tear of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is typically caused by a hit or blow to the outer knee. Pain is felt along the inner knee. Bracing and conservative treatment, such as rest and physical therapy, are usually sufficient to heal these injuries.

The meniscus is crescent-shaped cartilage between your thigh bone (femur) and lower leg bone (tibia). You have two of these cushions in each of your knees, inner (medial) and outer (lateral). The medial one is most often injured. These injuries often are caused by sudden twisting, resulting in swelling, pain and locking of the knee. Arthroscopic surgery may be necessary to remove the torn fragment when conservative treatment does not help.

Posted in Awareness

All About Our Knees Part 1 of a 6 part series.

About the knee 1 of 6

Did you know that your knee is the largest joint in your body. Its a really amazing and complex mechanism made of bone, cartilage and ligaments. The cartilage in your knee acts as a cushion and gliding surface. So the knee can move freely.

When the knee is healthy, the cartilage keeps the bones in the joint from rubbing together. However, when the joint is affected by arthritis, the bones make contact and cause mild or severe pain.

Injuries, as well as aging and degenerative conditions such as arthritis, osteoarthritis can cause the cartilage to break down.

Things like osteonecrosis of the knee (also known as avascular necrosis) is a painful condition that occurs when the blood supply to a section of bone in the femur (thighbone) or tibia (shinbone) is disrupted. And eventually can lead to severe osteoarthritis and even joint collapse.

Knee pain can affect every step you take. From playing sports to climbing steps, knee pain is difficult to ignore.

Some home remedies may help temporarily, but if you have chronic pain or symptoms such as swollen or red joints, it’s time to see a doctor.

I am not a fan of steroid injections or corticosteroids period as they can lead to Osteonecrosis.

And in my opinion doctors use these way too much for me. It seems like the go to drug for everything.

Because it helps inflammation but When prescribed in doses that exceed your body’s usual levels, corticosteroids suppress inflammation. This can reduce the signs and symptoms of inflammatory conditions, such as arthritis and asthma.

But they also have side effects like

What side effects can corticosteroids cause?

  • Elevated pressure in the eyes (glaucoma)
  • Fluid retention, causing swelling in your lower legs.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Problems with mood swings, memory and behavior and other psychological effects, such as confusion or delirium. Just to name a few.
Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Patient Leader, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards, WEGOHealthAwards2020

I Am A Nominee In The WEGOHealth Awards 2020

I am so honored to share that I am a nominee in the WEGOHealth Awards for Best In Show – Community and Patient Leader Hero

#WEGOHealthChat #WEGOHealthAwards #PatientLeader #Osteoarthritis #Osteonecrosis #Grateful www,ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com and  https://avascularnecrosiseducation.com

 

My WEGOHealth Profile Link    Deborah Andio WEGOHealth Profile Link

Voting will begin in July and link will be posted then to vote.

Until then if you wish to nominate me or read about WEGOHealth or take the time to nominate other amazing hardworking Advocates please go to link below

WEGOHealthAwards Vote – Review Nominees – How It Works -The Judges

 

My Nominations

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Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Hearing Loss, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Link-Between Hearing Loss and RA

When we think of hearing loss, you may associate it with your loved one who’s always asking you to repeat yourself, or the friend who may struggle to follow conversations.

Hearing loss is often caused by exposure to excessive noise and is even linked to the natural aging process. But did you know that hearing loss isn’t just caused by your loud job, or the blaring music at the concert ?

Along with lesser known causes of hearing loss like smoking and diabetes, a recent study found a link between hearing loss and rheumatoid arthritis.

 

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease that affects many seniors, though young people can also suffer from the disease. Around 1.5 million Americans have RA, and this number continues to rise. RA is an autoimmune disease, which means that the immune system turns against the body. Rather than protecting the body from sicknesses by warding off viral and bacterial infections, the immune system attacks the joints, causing swelling, inflammation, and pain. RA can damage cartilage and tissue around the joints, disform the joints, and even damage the bone. It becomes painful to move the affected joints, and leads to reduced mobility, and difficulty performing normal daily tasks.

Linking Hearing Loss and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Clinical trials looking at the links between hearing loss and arthritis found far higher rates of hearing loss among those with arthritis. Those with RA were more likely to have sensorineural hearing loss, hearing loss associated with the ear and not the brain. Delicate cells in the inner ear are damaged in this type of hearing loss, and once these cells are damaged, they don’t regenerate. You’ll be unable to hear certain sounds in the environment, since the cells in the ear responsible for those sounds have been destroyed.

A 2006 study found that around 43% of those with RA had hearing loss! And a study from the Mayo Clinic, reported that even though they weren’t able to detect measurably higher rates of hearing loss among those with RA, their patients with RA were far more likely to perceive that they had hearing loss.

 

How does RA Lead to Hearing Loss?

Researchers are still unclear on the how rheumatoid arthritis and hearing loss are linked. However, it’s clear that RA can attack other body systems, not just the joints, so the cells in the ear can also be affected by this disease.

Another link could be the drugs used to treat the pain that goes hand in hand with arthritis. Many studies have found that common pain killers, such as ibuprofen (Advil) and acetaminophen (Tylenol) can cause hearing loss. Even taking these pain killers two or more days per week was linked to worse hearing health, while those who took pain killers six days a week had a 24% higher risk of hearing loss than those who didn’t take pain killers. Those suffering from RA often take a lot of painkillers just to get through the day, and these drugs are known to reduce blood flow and deprive the cells in the inner ear of the oxygen and nutrients they need to survive.

Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis

While doctors can’t cure RA, they all agree that treating the disease as soon as possible is essential for good health outcomes. Treating RA stops inflammation, prevents further joint damage or deformity, and relieves pain. It also improves overall well-being by allowing for increased mobility and physical function. Treatments include medications to ease symptoms, as well as to reduce inflammation and slow joint damage.

Self-management is also important when it comes to RA, and your doctor will help you be proactive in managing the disease and maintaining your overall quality of life. Eating well, exercising often and resting, using heat pads, and learning relaxation techniques all play a role in self-management.

Treating Hearing Loss

If you’ve been struggling to hear, and think it may be linked to your RA, call your local hearing center.

May is Arthritis Awareness Month

Posted in Awareness

What Really Helps Arthritis

If you’re asking yourself- what can help my arthritis, I will try to clear up a few of the most popular misconceptions for you.

Here’s are a list of the most common questions about Arthritis and the facts about what can help arthritis pain.

1. Fact or Fiction? There is no cure for arthritis

True. There is no cure for arthritis; however, the discomfort and pain can be managed through medication, heat, splints, braces, adaptive devices and learning new ways to accomplish everyday tasks and activities.

2. Fact or Fiction? The weather makes a difference in how my joints feel

Fact. There’s a reason people move to Arizona. Dry, warm weather reduces joint pain. When the humidity is high and barometric pressure is low, particularly just before a storm, if you have arthritis you may feel increased pain or stiffness. If you live in a hot, humid climate, a dehumidifier in your home can help.  Most air conditioning systems also help reduce humidity, run it during the day and even overnight to help you sleep comfortably.

3. Fact or Fiction? My diet makes a difference in my arthritis symptoms and how I feel

Fact. Excess weight puts more stress on your joints. Keeping your weight in check helps protect them. Eating a balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables and a mix of grains and proteins makes good sense for everyone.

4. Fact or Fiction? I can’t exercise because I have arthritis

Fiction. Movement, including gently stretching, is important to increase strength and flexibility. Exercising also reduces the pain and stiffness in your joints. I love my recumbent bike.

You just have to think about how you work out. If running aggravates the arthritis in your knees and makes them ache, switch to a less intense and less weight-bearing exercise like swimming, biking or yoga.

Always consult with your health care provider before starting an exercise program.

5. Fact or Fiction? Nothing will reduce the pain of my arthritis

Fiction. Heat, ice, prescription and non-prescription medicines, topical ointments and splints can all help alleviate the pain and swelling associated with arthritis.

Cold and heat can both help when dealing with arthritis pain. Using heat in the morning relaxes muscles and reduces stiffness.

Using ice at night lessens joint inflammation for most people.

I personally like the heat from thermacare heat wraps. My joints just don’t tolerate cold.

Over-the-counter medications and prescription drugs can also be very beneficial in helping to control arthritis pain.

Non-prescription medications, including aspirin, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen, help control pain and swelling. But everyone can’t take them. Example you cannot take NSAIDS if you have had bariatric surgery. So always talk to your doctor.

Prescription medications, like COX-2 inhibitors, anti-TNF compounds, steroids, and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) help reduce swelling and pain and can prevent further damage. However steroids are known to cause Avascular Necrosis- Osteonecrosis

Speak with your health care provider or pharmacist to make sure you are taking the right medication, even nonprescription drugs can be harmful or ineffective if you are not taking them correctly or if they may cause an interaction with your other medications

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Bone and Joint Health, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Osteoporosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Joint Pain and Our Government

It’s that damn pain that may creep up slowly on you with a dull, discomfort in one or several of your joints.

Or it might be like a raging inferno it like a thief in the night, to steal your joy or try to…. the pain comes on suddenly without any warning, bringing on that stabbing intensity as sharp as a knife.

The pain might come and go, or it may last hours, days, weeks…. This pain is arthritis, and it’s likely you know someone living with it or you may be living with it yourself.

It is not just a grandparents issue.

I have been living with arthritis for over 20 years, I think I was 35-36 when I was diagnosed with osteoarthritis, only years later to be diagnosed also with osteonecrosis in 2014 and spondylolisthesis for over 5 years. It can really be exhausting from always dealing with some sort of pain.

Arthritis can be crippling. Some people even need a stair-lift just so they can move freely around their house as they are in too much pain to walk up and down the stairs. Some end up in a wheelchair or using a walker.

Did you know that arthritis impacts more than 50 million adults and 300,000 children in the U.S. According to The Arthritis Foundation, the number of people affected by the condition is expected to increase to 65-68 million by 2030.

More research is needed to combat this health crisis, a disease and source of chronic pain for so many people that it is often marginalized by misinformed attitudes, old wise tales, and social stigma.

Our government officials are not helping us either. They are trying to tell doctors what to prescribe and how much and limit them on treating their patients.

I wish the government would stay out of my health and my doctors business.

My doctor went to school many years and I don’t want some politician giving me medical advice when they have no idea what I live with on a daily basis.Nor have they went to school to become a doctor either.

Many like myself cannot take NSAIDs and when you have osteonecrosis,you really don’t want to constantly be using steroids.

I avoid steroids at all costs.

Arthritis includes more than 100 different types of joint disease and related conditions. I have written previously about osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and juvenile arthritis.

In the most basic terms, arthritis is inflammation of the joints that causes swelling, stiffness, reduced range of motion, and pain that can become chronic. It can affect your knees,ankles and toes, back, hip, fingers, wrists, elbows, shoulders, or neck.

Did you know that the heart, eyes, lungs, kidneys and skin can sometimes also be effected?

Arthritis can also affect your muscles, resulting in muscle weakness or fatigue.

The extra weight from obesity can strain your joints if you are not eating well and exercising regularly.

Your bones are like a bridge and like with any other bridge it has a weight limit before it starts to damage the bridge.

So we have to try to keep moving remove excess weight to keep out bridge aka our bones and joints strong and able to support us.

So many people often dismiss arthritis as a condition of older adulthood, but arthritis can strike any age, gender or race, and it is the leading cause of disability in the United States.

Chronic pain sufferers fear they could become casualties in the war on Ohio’s opioid overdose epidemic.

Because it seems like those who suffer in pain real chronic pain are the only ones paying the price.

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What they ( our elected officials ) don’t understand is responsible people are the ones suffering, not the drug addicts who use heroin and get many of their drugs illegally.

In August 2019 Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said that evidence recently made public makes clear that drugmakers were responsible for the deadly opioid crisis and that they had lied about the addictiveness of their painkillers.

I’m sorry but ya know I don’t buy that crap at all.

When will people actually learn to take responsibility for their own poor choices?

There has been people using and abusing drugs for decades, longer….

lThey are looking to get high, that’s a big difference than someone needing a pain pill now and then to function and have joint mobility and the pain managed.

I get so frustrated at our government always telling patients whats good for them.

And telling doctors how to do their job.

I don’t want my car mechanic telling my dentist how to clean my teeth.

And I don’t want my elected officials telling my doctor what to do.

Why not ban alcohol ?

Why not ban cigarettes

That kills a lot more people and well we know how many abuse that.

Probably because they get a tax on that , so that’s ok.

Just like marijuana, years ago you went to prison , now because the state can make a buck its ok as long as its medical.

According to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey, in 2013, more than half of the US adult population drank alcohol in the past 30 days. About 17% of the adult population reported binge drinking, and 6% reported heavy drinking.

According to the ARDI application, during 2006–2010, excessive alcohol use was responsible for an annual average of  88,000 deaths, including 1 in 10 deaths among working-age adults aged 20 to 64 years, and 2.5 million years of potential life lost.  More than half of these deaths and three-quarters of the years of potential life lost were due to binge drinking.  https://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/data-stats.htm

 

The Republican Governor of Ohio urged the companies to move quickly to settle pending lawsuits seeking to hold them accountable for the epidemic in light of troves of new documents made public because of those suits. And who gets the money from these lawsuits? Certainly not the people that were or are addicted , or their families……no it’s the state.

 

Get stricter on drunk driving laws https://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/impaired_driving/states-data-tables.html

 

But for gosh sakes stop punishing people responsible people who just are trying to live dealing with their chronic pain. To function, to get to work, to grocery shop to live.

Please get involved write or call your elected officials : tell them help those living with chronic pain not make them suffer.

They are not drug addicts they are people like you and me and your neighbor and like your grandparent, mother, uncle son or daughter suffering with chronic pain.

https://www.usa.gov/elected-officials

 

 

The most 5 common types of arthritis are Osteoarthritis, Fibromyalgia, Gout, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than a third of adults who have arthritis report it limits their leisure and work activities. 25% of them state it also causes severe pain (7+ on the 0 to 10 point pain scale).

Children and teens get a type of arthritis called juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). “Juvenile” means young (16 yrs of age or younger) and “idiopathic” means the cause is not known. JIA is also sometimes called juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA).

Many people confuse osteoporosis and different types of arthritis.

  • Arthritis: A general term for conditions that affect the joints and surrounding tissues. Joints are places in the body where bones come together, such as the knees, wrists, fingers, toes, and hips. The two most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Osteoporosis: A condition in which the bones become less dense and more likely to fracture. In osteoporosis, there is a loss of bone tissue that leaves bones less dense and more likely to fracture. It can result in a loss of height, severe back pain, and change in posture. Osteoporosis can impair a person’s ability to walk and can cause prolonged or permanent disability – Difference Between Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

References

Arthritis Foundation

AF types of arthritis

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness

May – Arthritis Awareness Month

I have had OA in knees over 14 years.

The clicking popping sounds , the feeling of stiffness like the tin man on the wizard of oz is normal especially when it’s rainy.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a form of degenerative joint pain caused by wear and tear on your joints. As you age, the cartilage that cushions your joints starts to wear down, causing the bones to rub together. The bone-on-bone action leads to inflammation of the joints.

Almost 300,000 babies and children have arthritis or a rheumatic condition.

The most common type of arthritis is osteoarthritis, which affects an estimated 54 million Americans.

Number of people expected to have doctor-diagnosed arthritis by the year 2040: more than 78 million.

People in the early stages of osteoarthritis may notice that moving the affected areas of their bodies is not as easy as it once was. Joint stiffness and pain can contribute to loss of flexibility, also called loss of range of motion.

Range of motion is the extent to which you can move your joints in their normal patterns. For example, fully bending and extending your knee is its range of motion.

If you have arthritis, you might not be able to bend your knee as far. Loss of flexibility is usually a very gradual process.

There’s no cure for osteoarthritis (OA) yet, but there are several treatment options and lifestyle changes that can relieve your symptoms. A combination of treatments and lifestyle changes can help:

  • alleviate symptoms
  • improve quality of life
  • slow progression of the disease

The right types of exercise can help with OA. Exercise may improve pain and stiffness and even prevent further damage to your joints. The stronger the muscles around your knee are, the better they can absorb the shock placed on the knee when you move.

Exercise can also help you lose weight, put less stress on the knees, and ease pain. Your doctor or physical therapist can recommend specific exercises based on your needs.

These may include strengthening exercises for your muscles and stretching and range-of-motion exercises for stiffness. Aerobic activity is recommended for those who need to lose weight.

Over-the-counter (OTC) medications like acetaminophen (Tylenol) and NSAIDs (ibuprofen, naproxen, aspirin) can help alleviate some of the pain and inflammation. Your doctor may also prescribe stronger medications.

Use caution, even when taking OTC medications. They can interact with other medications you’re taking. Always speak to your doctor before taking new medications.

Topical medications are also available. These creams and gels contain active ingredients that include: 

  • salicylate
  • menthol
  • capsaicin

Using these products may relieve the pain and inflammation associated with OA because of their heating and cooling effects on the skin.

Heat Over Ice

Many swear by ice ….. not me

I prefer heat… I also have osteonecrosis in Rt knee and I love love love thermacare heat wraps.

I personally found Heat helps my pain and mobility where as cold seems to make me hurt more.

Viscosupplementation works differently. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is injected into the knee joint. HA is a naturally present part of joint fluid. It lubricates the joints and helps them move freely. Most people with OA don’t have enough HA in their joint fluid.

By injecting HA into the joint, the knee benefits from extra lubrication. It decreases friction in the joint and improves the joint’s ability to absorb shock. This means less pain when you move.

Viscosupplementation has been found to provide relief to approximately 50 percent of people with OA of the knee. However, the newest guidelines from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) doesn’t recommend this for OA of the knee.

I personally hate cortisone injections. They cause me more pain and I get a reaction that makes me hurt worse.

Pulse it can lead to faster break down of cartilage and Osteonecrosis.

In the end we have to do and try what we feel may help.

Just know there are options

Prp Injections Platelet Rich Plasma

PRP

aaos treatment of osteoarthritis

I am not a paid endorser for any product mentioned.
Posted in Arthritis, Bone Health, Disclaimer, Life, OA, osteoarthritis, Pain, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Arthritis

Arthritis and related diseases can cause debilitating, life-changing pain. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of the adults who have arthritis report that it limits their leisure activities and work. And 25 percent of them say it causes severe pain (seven or higher on a zero to 10 point scale).

There are more than 100 different forms of arthritis and related diseases. The most common types include osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), fibromyalgia and gout. All of them cause pain in different ways.

Osteoarthritis
In osteoarthritis (OA), the protective cartilage inside the joint breaks down. This makes movement of affected joints more difficult and painful. In time, bones of the joint may rub directly against one another, causing severe pain. Pain can also come from parts of your joint other than the cartilage, such as bone, synovium and ligaments. The intensity of OA pain varies from person to person and can range from mild to severe.

Rheumatoid Arthritis
In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the joints and other organs are attacked by the body’s own immune system. The immune system normally protects a person from viruses, bacteria and other invaders. In people with autoimmune diseases like RA, it becomes overactive and attacks healthy tissue. In the case of RA, the immune system primarily goes after the lining of the joints, called the synovium. Over time, the persistent inflammation breaks down the joint and damages it permanently.

Pain in RA can come from other parts of your joint besides the synovium, such as bone and ligaments.

Psoriatic Arthritis
Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease in which the immune system attacks the body, causing inflammation and pain. PsA affects the joints, causing arthritis; the connective tissue where tendons or ligaments attach to bones, causing enthesitis; and the skin, causing psoriasis.

Fibromyalgia
Fibromyalgia is considered a central pain syndrome. This means that the brain and spinal cord process pain signals differently. A touch or movement that doesn’t cause pain for others may feel painful to you (this is called allodynia). Something that is mildly painful to someone without fibromyalgia may hurt you even more (this is called hyperalgesia).

Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread pain. It may come and go or be constant. Besides pain, fibromyalgia is associated with other symptoms, such as fatigue, sleep problems, inability to concentrate and mood troubles.

Gout
Gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis, but it does not cause body-wide inflammation like RA or PsA does. In gout, uric acid crystals are the problem. If your body produces too much uric acid or if you are unable to remove the excess fast enough, it can build up in the blood (called hyperuricemia). Excess uric acid can form crystals in your joints. This results in extremely painful joint inflammation. Gout usually strikes in the large joint of the big toe, but can also affect other joints. With a gout flare, you can go to bed feeling fine and wake up with excruciating pain.

Lupus
Lupus is an autoimmune inflammatory disease that affects many parts of the body, including the joints, kidneys, skin, blood, brain and other organs. It can cause joint pain, fatigue, hair loss, sensitivity to light, fever, rash and kidney problems.

Back Pain
Back pain can be a symptom of several forms of arthritis and related conditions, including ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and fibromyalgia. Most back pain, however, is the result of some type of injury, such lifting or bending improperly, a sports injury or an automobile accident.

Other Musculoskeletal Pain
Soft-tissue rheumatic conditions can also cause pain. In these conditions, muscles, connective tissues such as tendons and ligaments, and bursae become inflamed and painful.

#Arthritis #Osteoarthritis #Rheumatoid #Arthritis #Gout #PsoriaticArthritis

More links to various forms of Arthritis
http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/alphaidx.asp?p=a_1

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