Posted in Awareness

Thank You Alabama

Grateful

We are moving along state by state

Alabama is giving us for rare disease awareness the week of February 20,2020 to February 27, 2020 as Avascular Necrosis Osteonecrosis Awareness Week!!!

And on November 29 Avascular Necrosis Osteonecrosis Awareness Day!!

Every state so far is coming on board!!

Thank you Lord

Deb Andio

Posted in Awareness

Happy New Year – And New Decade

My last post of 2019 and looking forward to the New Year and also a new decade.

I would like to take this time to thank you all for reading and following my blog. I am grateful for each one of you.

Tonight isn’t your typical New Year’s Eve. The world is welcoming not just the new year, but the next decade. The 2020s! That’s pretty awesome !

That happens, only once every ten years.

Each new year offers us all an exciting opportunity for a fresh start and new beginnings, which is probably why we all look forward to New Year’s Eve so much.

No matter what your goals are for the coming year are or how many new year’s resolutions you plan on making for 2020, ringing in the start of a new year and a new decade is a moment to acknowledge.

One,

to celebrate and recap all of your experiences good and bad from 2019

and

Two

to welcome the new year ahead.

Now is the time to let old troubles and worries go.

Vow to be a better you.

Wishing you all a Happy – Healthy – Joyous -Safe -Enlightening -Spiritual Prosperous New Year.

Quotes for the new year

“Life is all about change, sometimes it’s painful, sometimes it’s joyful sometimes it’s frustrating and sometimes it’s beautiful, but most of the time it’s all the above .” 

Deborah Andio

The first step towards getting somewhere is to decide you’re not going to stay where you are.”

J.P. Morgan

“Celebrate endings—for they precede new beginnings.”

Jonathan Lockwood Huie

“Your present circumstances don’t determine where you can go. They merely determine where you start.”

Nido Qubein

New Year’s Prayer

Let us live each day in the most loving ways, the God-conscious way. Let us serve all who are in need, regardless of race, color or creed.

May your year be filled with peace, prosperity and love. May God’s blessings shower upon you and bestow upon each of you a bright, healthy and peaceful new year

Amen.

Posted in Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Government, Mayor, Ohio, Osteonecrosis, Senator, Youngstown Ohio

Official Proclamation Avascular Necrosis -Osteonecrosis Awareness Day is November 29,2019 and every year after.

Finally Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis has an official awareness date.

The date is November 29

I have been working on proclamations for several months and I am in the process of getting the awareness day Nationally recognized as well.

I have been advocating for over 5 years on Avascular Necrosis -Osteonecrosis and I am proud and grateful that our elected officials are also recognizing this awareness day.

What is a proclamation?

A proclamation is a formal way to make a public announcement or declaration. Government officials, such as mayors and state legislators, often issue proclamations to announce upcoming events or celebrations or to increase public awareness of particular issues.

I am proud to say I was issued a proclamation by my local Mayor of Youngstown Ohio

And also by Senator Michael Rulli of Ohio.

I have heard from Washington DC and it’s a longer procedure but it’s being looked at.

Right Now AVN-ON falls under the rare disease / disorder category.

In the United States, a rare disease is defined as a condition that affects fewer than 200,000 people. This definition was created by Congress in the Orphan Drug Act of 1983. Rare diseases became known as orphan diseases because drug companies were not interested in adopting them to develop treatment

Well I am hoping that now that AVN is getting recognition we can get more research to help all of us that are dealing with this painful condition.

Thank you to

Senator Michael Rulli -Ohio

and

Mayor Jamal Tito Brown – Youngstown Ohio

For helping us who suffer finally get the awareness day we deserve

God Bless You and Thank You.

Posted in Awareness, Bone Health

Fall Weather + Falling Temps = Joint Pain

Can you predict the weather based on how your joints feel?

Is it Cloudy with a chance of pain I your neck of the woods?

Can increased joint pain be caused by the weather?

In my opinion and experience absolutely

For every mile I walk in the fall feels like 2 on my knee joints especially when it’s below 45 degrees and the air is very dry.

When its fall and winter my bones sound like I am walking on a few leaves or twigs some days.

There is no one explanation for why dropping temperatures affect your joints.

One theory relates to drops in barometric pressure, which causes tendons, muscles, and the surrounding tissues to expand. Because of the confined space within the body, this can cause pain, especially in joints affected by osteoarthritis.

For me having Osteoarthritis and Osteonecrosis as well as Spondylolisthesis in my L5S1 this weather has been pretty painful for several years now. But I cannot allow it to keep me from moving.

In days I just want to stay under the blanket, I still make sure I move .

Sitting is a killer.

Thankfully I have found ways to help my pain

I take curcumin as well as a few years ago started to I eat a more plant based diet.

It’s not only helped my pain be less intense it’s also given me other benefits, lower blood pressure, lower cholesterol and triglycerides and my scale was lower.

Sure we need protein but for me I prefer mostly plant protein and occasionally eat chicken and fish and maybe 1x a month good quality red meat.

I have noticed a big improvement on how I feel also.

Less foggy , more energy and just overall more balanced.

I eat

  • Omega-3 fatty acids. Think fish and walnuts to curb inflammation. Avocados yummy!!
  • Vitamin K. Make meals that feature greens, such as spinach, kale, and cabbage, for their pain-soothing properties.
  • Vitamin C. Add color to your diet with juicy oranges, sweet red peppers and tomatoes, and other C-rich foods to halt cartilage loss (and resulting pain) that comes with arthritis
  • Spices Turmeric, Curcumin,Hot peppers, Sriracha I love all the heat and they have anti inflammatory properties that help with pain.

I avoid

Avoid foods high in omega-6 fatty acids, such as corn oil, which may trigger painful inflammation.

Also swap refined grains for more whole grain. research suggests refined grains have an inflammatory effect, whereas high-fiber whole grains may help reduce inflammation.

Keep Moving
One reason cold weather is linked to joint pain is people are less likely to exercise when it’s chilly and damp.

Being a couch potato is bad news for your joints because exercise helps lubricate them to prevent pain and it’s shown to age us faster.

I have a recumbent bike for indoors to help my joints stay moving.

I make sure I’m getting plenty of vitamin D to help keep my bones stay strong and prevent even morejoint pain.

I for a supplement with D3 (the kind your body manufactures from sunlight), but check with your doctor first because some supplements can interact with prescription and over-the-counter drugs.

Another thing I do is I keep my joints warm.

I love thermacare heat wraps.

Many ask me about what I eat in a day or what products I like.

So lasted this week I will let you know as I get my holiday favs ready.

I am not paid or endorsed in anyway.

These are things I like from personal experience.

Stay warm , and keep moving

Wishing you a pain free day

Posted in awards,patient leader, Awareness

WEGOHealth Awards2019©

Wow I am beyond honored I’ve now also been

Nominated for Patient Leader Hero- Healthcare Collaborator – Rookie of The Year and Best In Show Blog

img_3146

Endorsements Now Open If You Would Like to Vote (link below)

I have been nominated for the past few years in various categories

Thank You for considering Endorsing my nominations

It’s deeply appreciated

My Profile and Info WEGOHealth Link

Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis Education

FlexitarianForLife

My Links

https://avascularnecrosiseducation.com/

www.ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com

https://www.facebook.com/AvascularNecrosisEducation/

https://flexitarianforlife.wordpress.com/

 

https://twitter.com/debbiea001

https://twitter.com/OsteonecrosisMe

https://www.instagram.com/chronicallygratefulme/?hl=en

https://www.instagram.com/deborah_andio/

https://www.facebook.com/ChronicallyGratefulDebla/

 

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Posted in Awareness

Knee pain from exercise? Here’s what you should know….

Do you suffer with knee pain from exercise?

Here’s what you should know, according to Health’s medical expert.

Knee pain especially during and after exercise is a common exercise complaint.

The knee is an intricate joint, involving bones, menisci, muscles, tendons, and ligaments they all are working in rhythm supporting the joint.

If there is damage or stress to any of these components, you may have achy knees. Plus, many physical activities—running, jumping, stretching, bending—can put a lot of strain, impact, or body weight directly on the knees, and in turn, cause pain while you work out. This is common among weekend warriors who work out intensely but inconsistently. You can also develop tendonitis over time if you’re regularly doing these motions.

If you feel sharp sudden or stabbing pain stop and contact your physician.

Knee pain is a common complaint that affects people of all ages. Knee pain may be the result of an injury, such as a ruptured ligament or torn cartilage. Medical conditions — including arthritis, gout and infections — also can cause knee pain.

Many types of minor knee pain respond well to self-care measures. Physical therapy and knee braces also can help relieve knee pain. In some cases, however, your knee may require surgical repair.

Symptoms

The location and severity of knee pain may vary, depending on the cause of the problem. Signs and symptoms that sometimes accompany knee pain include:

  • Swelling and stiffness
  • Redness and warmth to the touch
  • Weakness or instability
  • Popping or crunching noises
  • Inability to fully straighten the knee

When to see a doctor

Call your doctor if you:

  • Can’t bear weight on your knee or feel as if your knee is unstable (gives out)
  • Have marked knee swelling
  • Are unable to fully extend or flex your knee
  • See an obvious deformity in your leg or knee
  • Have a fever, in addition to redness, pain and swelling in your knee
  • Have severe knee pain that is associated with an injury

Causes

Knee pain can be caused by injuries, mechanical problems, types of arthritis and other problems.

Injuries

A knee injury can affect any of the ligaments, tendons or fluid-filled sacs (bursae) that surround your knee joint as well as the bones, cartilage and ligaments that form the joint itself. Some of the more common knee injuries include:

  • ACL injury. An ACL injury is a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) — one of four ligaments that connect your shinbone to your thighbone. An ACL injury is particularly common in people who play basketball, soccer or other sports that require sudden changes in direction.
  • Fractures. The bones of the knee, including the kneecap (patella), can be broken during motor vehicle collisions or falls. People whose bones have been weakened by osteoporosis can sometimes sustain a knee fracture simply by stepping wrong.
  • Torn meniscus. The meniscus is formed of tough, rubbery cartilage and acts as a shock absorber between your shinbone and thighbone. It can be torn if you suddenly twist your knee while bearing weight on it.
  • Knee bursitis. Some knee injuries cause inflammation in the bursae, the small sacs of fluid that cushion the outside of your knee joint so that tendons and ligaments glide smoothly over the joint.
  • Patellar tendinitis. Tendinitis is irritation and inflammation of one or more tendons — the thick, fibrous tissues that attach muscles to bones. Runners, skiers, cyclists, and those involved in jumping sports and activities may develop inflammation in the patellar tendon, which connects the quadriceps muscle on the front of the thigh to the shinbone.

Mechanical problems

Some examples of mechanical problems that can cause knee pain include:

  • Loose body. Sometimes injury or degeneration of bone or cartilage can cause a piece of bone or cartilage to break off and float in the joint space. This may not create any problems unless the loose body interferes with knee joint movement, in which case the effect is something like a pencil caught in a door hinge.
  • Iliotibial band syndrome. This occurs when the tough band of tissue that extends from the outside of your hip to the outside of your knee (iliotibial band) becomes so tight that it rubs against the outer portion of your femur. Distance runners and cyclists are especially susceptible to iliotibial band syndrome.
  • Dislocated kneecap. This occurs when the triangular bone (patella) that covers the front of your knee slips out of place, usually to the outside of your knee. In some cases, the kneecap may stay displaced and you’ll be able to see the dislocation.
  • Hip or foot pain. If you have hip or foot pain, you may change the way you walk to spare these painful joints. But this altered gait can place more stress on your knee joint. In some cases, problems in the hip or foot can cause knee pain.

Types of arthritis

More than 100 different types of arthritis exist. The varieties most likely to affect the knee include:

  • Osteoarthritis. Sometimes called degenerative arthritis, osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It’s a wear-and-tear condition that occurs when the cartilage in your knee deteriorates with use and age.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. The most debilitating form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune condition that can affect almost any joint in your body, including your knees. Although rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease, it tends to vary in severity and may even come and go.
  • Gout. This type of arthritis occurs when uric acid crystals build up in the joint. While gout most commonly affects the big toe, it can also occur in the knee.
  • Pseudogout. Often mistaken for gout, pseudogout is caused by calcium-containing crystals that develop in the joint fluid. Knees are the most common joint affected by pseudogout.
  • Septic arthritis. Sometimes your knee joint can become infected, leading to swelling, pain and redness. Septic arthritis often occurs with a fever, and there’s usually no trauma before the onset of pain. Septic arthritis can quickly cause extensive damage to the knee cartilage. If you have knee pain with any of these symptoms, see your doctor right away.

Other problems

Patellofemoral

pain syndrome is a general term that refers to pain arising between the kneecap (patella) and the underlying thighbone (femur). It’s common in athletes; in young adults, especially those who have a slight maltracking of the kneecap; and in older adults, who usually develop the condition as a result of arthritis of the kneecap.

Osteonecrosis

Also called: Aseptic necrosis, Avascular necrosis, Ischemic necrosis

Osteonecrosis is a disease caused by reduced blood flow to bones in the joints. In people with healthy bones, new bone is always replacing old bone. In osteonecrosis, the lack of blood causes the bone to break down faster than the body can make enough new bone. The bone starts to die and may break down.

You can have osteonecrosis in one or several bones. It is most common in the upper leg. Other common sites are your upper arm and your knees, shoulders and ankles. The disease can affect men and women of any age, but it usually strikes in your thirties, forties or fifties. 

At first, you might not have any symptoms. As the disease gets worse, you will probably have joint pain that becomes more severe. You may not be able to bend or move the affected joint very well. 

No one is sure what causes the disease. Risk factors include 

  • Long-term steroid treatment
  • Alcohol abuse
  • Joint injuries
  • Having certain diseases, including arthritis and cancer 

Doctors use imaging tests and other tests to diagnose osteonecrosis. Treatments include medicines, using crutches, limiting activities that put weight on the affected joints, electrical stimulation and surgery.

Risk factors

A number of factors can increase your risk of having knee problems, including:

  • Excess weight. Being overweight or obese increases stress on your knee joints, even during ordinary activities such as walking or going up and down stairs. It also puts you at increased risk of osteoarthritis by accelerating the breakdown of joint cartilage.
  • Lack of muscle flexibility or strength. A lack of strength and flexibility can increase the risk of knee injuries. Strong muscles help to stabilize and protect your joints, and muscle flexibility can help you achieve full range of motion.
  • Certain sports or occupations. Some sports put greater stress on your knees than do others. Alpine skiing with its rigid ski boots and potential for falls, basketball’s jumps and pivots, and the repeated pounding your knees take when you run or jog all increase your risk of knee injury. Jobs that require repetitive stress on the knees such as construction or farming also can increase your risk.
  • Previous injury. Having a previous knee injury makes it more likely that you’ll injure your knee again.

Complications

Not all knee pain is serious. But some knee injuries and medical conditions, such as osteoarthritis, can lead to increasing pain, joint damage and disability if left untreated. And having a knee injury — even a minor one — makes it more likely that you’ll have similar injuries in the future.

Prevention

Although it’s not always possible to prevent knee pain, the following suggestions may help forestall injuries and joint deterioration:

  • Keep extra pounds off. Maintain a healthy weight; it’s one of the best things you can do for your knees. Every extra pound puts additional strain on your joints, increasing the risk of injuries and osteoarthritis.
  • Be in shape to play your sport. To prepare your muscles for the demands of sports participation, take time for conditioning. Work with a coach or trainer to ensure that your technique and movement are the best they can be.
  • Practice perfectly. Make sure the technique and movement patterns you use in your sports or activity are the best they can be. Lessons from a professional can be very helpful.
  • Get strong, stay flexible. Because weak muscles are a leading cause of knee injuries, you’ll benefit from building up your quadriceps and hamstrings, which support your knees. Balance and stability training helps the muscles around your knees work together more effectively. And because tight muscles also can contribute to injury, stretching is important. Try to include flexibility exercises in your workouts.
  • Be smart about exercise. If you have osteoarthritis, chronic knee pain or recurring injuries, you may need to change the way you exercise. Consider switching to swimming, water aerobics or other low-impact activities — at least for a few days a week. Sometimes simply limiting high-impact activities will provide relief.
Posted in Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Osteonecrosis

Could use your assistance

I need you to help me get to my goal

Link For Petition2Congress To Make October Osteonecrosis Awareness Month

I have started a petition to get the rare disease Osteonecrosis recognized by asking for an awareness month week or day. If they won’t allow a month.

I could use as many supporters as possible to help me and share this.

No money at all is needed.

I hope you will help me raise awareness

Take Action: We Need Osteonecrosis Awareness To Have The Month Of October to Recognized & raise awareness #Osteonecrosis #AvascularNecrosis please help and sign and share

Link Petition2Congress For Awareness Month Request – Osteonecrosis

Or copy and paste

https://www.petition2congress.com/ctas/osteonecrosis-awareness-month-october

To President Donald Trump, The U.S. House and The U.S. Senate
We, the patients of a rare disease called Osteonecrosis respectfully ask the United States of America in this petition to the US Congress to pass legislation to establish and recognize October as Osteonecrosis Awareness Month in the United States. 
The people of the United States are called upon to observe the month of October with appropriate educational and awareness opportunities, and recognition.
With hundreds of thousands of US residents suffering from this disease and more being diagnosed everyday , there is a need for this community to have an active voice and recognition. 
It is happening in all age groups from child to elderly

Osteonecrosis, also known as Avascular necrosis (AVN), aseptic necrosis or ischemic bone necrosis, is a disease resulting in the death of bone cells. If the process involves the bones near a joint, it often leads to collapse of the joint surface and subsequent debilitating often crippling arthritis due to an irregular joint surface. 

Although it can happen in any bone, osteonecrosis most commonly affects the ends (epiphysis) of long bones such as the femur (thigh bone). Commonly involved bones are the upper femur (ball part of the hip socket) the lower femur (a part of the knee joint), the upper humerus (upper arm bone involving the shoulder joint), and the bones of ankle joint. The disease may affect just one bone, more than one bone at the same time, or more than one bone at different times.  
Osteonecrosis can cause severe pain and disability. Early diagnosis and early treatment may improve the outcome.
Osteonecrosis may result from use of glucocorticoid (sometimes called corticosteroid) medicine or from drinking too much alcohol but there are many causes and also some that are unknown.
Though osteonecrosis can occur in almost any bone of the body, the hips, knees,ankle and shoulders are the most common sites affected.
The cause and treatment for osteonecrosis of the jaw differs from that for osteonecrosis found elsewhere.

The most common causes of osteonecrosis are:

Serious trauma to bone or joint (injury), which interrupts a bone’s blood supply
Corticosteroid medications (such as prednisone, cortisone or methylprednisolone), mainly when a high dose is used for a prolonged period of time
Excess alcohol consumption
Systemic lupus erythematosus

Other risk factors for osteonecrosis include:
Decompression disease (also called the “Bends” that can occur with scuba diving)
Blood disorders such as sickle cell anemia, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) and lupus anticoagulant, factor v leiden, and others
HIV infection (the virus that causes AIDS)
Radiation and Chemotherapy
Bisphosphonates, which may be linked to osteonecrosis of the jaw
Organ transplants

Osteonecrosis is not life-threatening, but it is debilitating and hurts our quality of life. Although it isn’t well-known and its exact cause is unknown, AVN-ON affects 10,000-to-20,000 Americans annually. Between 30 and 60 percent of patients will experience AVN-ON bi-laterally, which means both sides so if one hip or knee has it most likely so will the other.

Please help those of us that suffer from this condition by creating more research , funding studies and allowing us the recognition, as only through education, research and awareness can we get better treatment options, earlier diagnosis and hopefully prevention. 

Thank You

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Bone and Joint Health, Bone Health, Grateful, Inflammation, Knee, Weather, Weather and Joint Pain

Bombogenesis and Joint Pain

I’ve heard a lot about Bombogenesis, it’s a popular term used by meteorologists, occurs when a midlatitude cyclone rapidly intensifies, dropping at least 24 millibars over 24 hours. A millibar measures atmospheric pressure.

Remember your great-aunt used to to say she “feels” a storm coming on, she was probably predicting the weather with some accuracy. You probably laughed.

But now you know exactly what she meant.

Barometric pressure is the weight of the atmosphere that surrounds us. Barometric pressure often drops before bad weather.

Lower air pressure pushes less against the body, allowing tissues to expand. Expanded tissues can put pressure on joints and cause pain.

Arthritis and joint pain affects everything within the joint, including the lining and ligaments.

All of those tissues have nerve endings that can feel changes in the weather, which may result in tightness, stiffness, and some discomfort.

So if you plan to be active in cold weather or high altitude, warm up first with stretching exercises and wear appropriate clothing

The Arthritis Foundation published a study from Tufts University in 2007 that found that every 10-degree drop in temperature corresponded with an incremental increase in arthritis pain. In addition, low temperatures, low barometric pressure and precipitation can increase pain. Researchers are not sure why weather changes cause pain, but suspect that certain atmospheric conditions increase swelling in the joint.

As for weather-related pain, it hurts, but it’s only temporary. Your joints should return to normal as soon as the barometric pressure increases and the temperature goes up. Your great aunt may be able to predict calm weather, too, as she feels less joint pain.

Song of The Day : California Dreaming Mamas And Papas

Resource Link

https://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/tools-resources/weather/

Posted in Avascular Necrosis, Bone Health, Bone Marrow, Bone Marrow Edema, Diagnosed, Osteonecrosis

Understanding Bone Marrow Edema-Linked To Osteonecrosis

Good Morning Pain Warriors Around The World

It is time to educate on the various causes of

Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis

So twice a week we will post some educational info on a cause with links

Today Its Bone Marrow Edema

What is Bone Marrow Edema?

Bone marrow edema is a condition when excess fluids in the bone marrow build up and cause swelling. It is often caused by a response to an injury, such as a broken bone or a bruise, or a more chronic condition such as osteoporosis. Bone marrow edema most commonly occurs in the hips, knees and ankles. In this case, bone marrow edema of the knee is a main cause of localized knee and joint pain, and is only diagnosable via a Magnetic Resonance Imagining test (MRI).

It is usually caused by the following scenarios:

  • Avascular necrosis, or “bone death”. This is when a small portion of the bone dies, and can result in a painful bone marrow edema
  • Any type of knee bone trauma, including broken bones and bone bruises.
  • Joint disorders such as osteoarthritis or osteoporosis. In this case, the knee joint is lacking the cushion that cartilage provides, which can lead to easier fracture and wear on the bone. Subsequently, if a fracture of the bone occurs, the injured area becomes susceptible to edema..
  • Knee ligament injuries.
  • A condition such as synovitis (an inflammation of the lining the joints, called synovial membranes).
  • In rare conditions, bone tumor.

Symptoms of Bone Marrow Edema in the Knee

Bone marrow edemas may not bother you at all, or they may be painful and inconvenient. They can feel more intense than a muscular injury (for example, a muscle bruise) at times due to the nature of the bone. A muscle is capable of swelling, which increases blood flow to heal the area. Unfortunately, bones are not capable of swelling, and thus the fluid (edema) that collects in the marrow can create intense pressure within the bone, resulting in more intense pain. In fact, in many osteoarthritic patients, it isn’t the lack of cartilage that’s causing them pain, but rather the pressure due to the edema.

 

Some of the most common symptoms of bone marrow endema include:

  • Varying degrees of pain, from mild to moderate, depending on the severity and Trauma.
  • Swelling of the knee area.
  • Inability to put full pressure on the knee to walk.
  • Recurrent pain and tenderness.
  • Bruising.

Treatment of Bone Marrow Edema in the Knee

Thankfully, most bone marrow edemas will settle down and heal on their own after the injury has subsided. For example, in some cases of osteonecrosis the bone will regenerate itself and heal the edema but note : not all cases of osteonecrosis or spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee will have the ability to heal itself. Unfortunately, though, in the case of osteoarthritis, the edema may only get worse over time. In this circumstance, treatment options may be explored.

Traditional treatments for bone marrow edema usually involve rehabilitation through physiotherapy and rest. Ice, medications such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen, and even a crutch or a cane can help as well. There is one drug-facilitated treatment that uses a bisphosphonate and vitamin D mixture to help increase bone density. When this treatment is delivered via intravenous, it is found to be quite effective in reducing pain and increasing density. Other drugs that usually treat the vascular system have been found effective for bone marrow edema, in that they encourage blood flow and treat any vascular abnormalities that may exist in the bone and marrow.

In some more challenging cases, core decompression may be used. This is a type of surgery where a surgeon drills a hole into the affected part of the bone allowing that area of the bone to experience increased blood flow, form new blood vessels, and heal.

Another option is subchondroplasty, which can be especially effective for osteoarthritis patients. In this procedure, an x-ray determines where the edema is. The patient is then sedated, and a small needle injects a paste into the area of the edema. The paste then hardens and provides more strength and density to the bone. By improving the strength of the bone, it will enable the bone to deal with the pain of the edema and of the osteoarthritis.

http://louisvillebones.com/understanding-bone-marrow-edema/

 

Knee

https://www.g2orthopedics.com/bone-marrow-edema-in-the-knee/

https://www.researchgate.net/…/7224238_Bone_marrow_edema_in…

https://www.researchgate.net/…/7224238_Bone_marrow_edema_in…

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/crirh/2018/7657982/

 

Hip Study

https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/94/4/1068/2596208

 

https://www.ajronline.org/doi/10.2214/AJR.05.0086

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15049532

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4972799/

 

Shoulder

https://www.sciencedirect.com/…/veterinary-sc…/osteonecrosis

 

Ankle

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21189186

https://www.footanklesurgery-journal.com/…/S1268-7…/abstract

https://wordpress.com/post/avascularnecrosiseducation.wordpress.com/128

 

If you have #Osteonecrosis feel free to join our #group

Avascular Necrosis / Osteonecrosis Support Int’l.

 

Priceless – King & Country  

king and country

 

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Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Chronic Pain, Clinical Trials, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Hashimoto, Hypothyroidism, Life, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, SPONK, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Support Group, Hope, The Mighty, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards, wellness

WEGOHealth Awards and How to Nominate Others

I’m honored to say I’ve been nominated for the #WEGOHealthAwards! These awards seek to recognize Patient Leaders who are making an impact with their advocacy. Learn more – nominate today.

Here’s how you can also nominate others who educate, advocate and make a difference!

Click link below

WEGOHealth Awards and Nomination Info

WEGOHealth Awards Link To Information

Think about the advocates and influencers you see leading Facebook groups, blogging about their health journey, speaking up and giving insights to healthcare companies, presenting on national stages, and running Twitter chats.

Patient Leaders have started non-profits, published podcast episodes, and authored books – there is no shortage of Patient Leaders’ contributions to the world, so let’s recognize as many of them as we can for their talents, contributions, and commitment.

Feel free to add their names and web info also in my comment section! And they can get some recognition here to !

Have a Great Day Everyone

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, SONK, SPONK, Stem Cell, Stem Cell Injections, Thoughts, WegoHealth, wellness

The Cost Of Knee Replacements

If you’re having trouble with your knees, you’re not alone.

I also have knee issues. I have Osteonecrosis and osteoarthritis and a torn meniscus all in the same knee.

And doctors are basically waiting for my knee to collapse to replace it.

Me I’m looking to avoid a collapse but at the 10k out of pocket cost it’s almost impossible. I’m talking stem cell injection.

Many people young and old alike are having many problems with their knees and ready to stop the pain.

Can you believe knee replacements have doubled in the United States from 2004 to 2014!

People want to have relief from their knee pain. The shouldn’t have to pas on a treatment that will work becz it’s not covered, or be stuck to live in pain until the knee collapses, then be forced to pay for a replacement.

One option that often comes up is knee replacement surgery.

However, it’s a very expensive surgery that includes a lot of pain and extensive physical therapy. And come on now let’s not forget they remove the end of the knee and replace it with artificial parts.

So let’s walk you through the true cost of knee replacement surgery so you have an idea of what to expect.

Pre-Surgical Consultation Fees

Individuals having knee replacement surgery can expect to incur costs long before actually being admitted to the hospital.

A pre-surgical evaluation or consultation must be completed by your orthopedic surgeon in order to see if an individual can even have the surgery. I think they do this for every surgery to make sure we are strong enough to handle the surgery and not die in the table.

I had umbilical hernia surgery in 2017 and had a cut scan , then a stress test, blood work. All for a 40 minute hernia repair.

Anyway………

This consultation will involve imaging X-rays and MRI’s ,then there is blood work, cultures, and panels.

Patients can expect their providers to also do the following:

Determine bone mineral density

Issue a liver function test

Do an EKG or EC

Possibly a stress test

Conduct a urine test

The consult determines what type of knee replacement surgery will be required PKR or TKR partial or total knee replacement.

Then the cost of the hospital stay and surgery costs.

Those who gave a knee replacement should expect to be in the hospital for at least 2-6 days.

During this time, the patient will require the help of many healthcare professionals.

The cost of the inpatient stay will largely be dependent upon the following:

Length of time in the operating room

Any preexisting conditions that require extra care

Type of implant

Surgical approach

Complications

Number of days in the hospital

Be prepared while in the hospital you will be paying for everything, every pill, glass of water, meals, physical therapy, nurses all of it

Many knee surgery candidates elect to have surgery overseas due to the large difference in cost. In some countries, knee replacement surgery is 50 to 80 percent cheaper than they are in the United States. But no always covered by insurance and it can be risky.

So say you have an 80/20 plan and your knee replacement is 45,000.00 your 20 percent is 9000.00

Now a stem cell injection is 8-10,000usd. Would it not be more cost effective and save the patient pain , and the actual loss of their own joint to just even cover a stem cell injection if the patient meets the criteria?

Even 60/40 would be a plus.

We have get insurance companies, medicare and Medicare to come into the real world. We have great medical technology it’s time the average person has access to it.

Living a life waiting for your knee to collapse is no fun, it’s poor quality and when there are alternative options that could help if you qualify why are we forced to suffer.!!

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Eat Healthy, Food Is Thy Medicine, OA, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, Thoughts, Uncategorized, Vegetables, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards

The Food Your Eating Could Be Making Your Pain Worse.

Before you take one more bite or swing into that fast food place stop and consider how it affects your health. I have osteoarthritis (OA) and Osteonecrosis and what I eat definitely effects my levels of pain and inflammation.

So I started to help myself by eating mostly plant based but I am a flexitarian.

Did you know research shows that diets high in saturated fat – found in red meat, butter, cheese, lard and processed foods – can weaken knee cartilage, making it more prone to damage.

In a 2017 study published in Arthritis Care & Research, researchers followed more than 2,000 patients with OA for up to four years, checking disease progression  and diet at yearly intervals.

Participants who ate the most fat, especially the saturated kind, showed increasing joint damage, whereas those who ate healthy fats like olive oil and avocados had little disease progression.

Another recent animal study showed that it even may harm the underlying bone, according to Yin Xiao, PhD, a professor at Queensland University of Technology in Australia and lead author of a 2017 study that looked at the effect of diet on OA.

For me I went to a mostly plant based lifestyle to help ease my pain from Osteonecrosis and Osteoarthritis in late 2016. And I know that I have less pain.

I’m not cured and there are still days when I feel like crap. But it’s not everyday all day like it was before.

We have to fight back

The solution is to change the way we eat. Switching to an anti-inflammatory or Mediterranean-style diet can help you significantly improve your joint pain , and help your heart and  brain health and the food tastes great.

An anti-inflammatory diet is heavy on fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and healthy fats like olive oil, avocados and nuts.

Poultry’s and fish are allowed  now and then and you can have one glass of red wine or beer a day. Off the menu, as you might expect, are sugar, red meat, and processed foods.

For me it’s also gluten because I have a sensitivity to it.

It takes a little work in meal planning but the benefits are worth it.

Stay tuned an example of what to eat will be in my next post.

Remember

The food you eat can be either the powerful and healing or a form of poison.

You are what you eat.

Have a fantastic day

Deb Andio

xoxo

References

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170523190029.htm

https://www.health.harvard.edu/nutrition/can-diet-improve-arthritis-symptoms

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Eat Healthy, Energy, Hashimoto, Meditation, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, Plant, RareDisease, SONK, spondylolisthesis, SPONK, Thoughts, Thyroid, Uncategorized, Vegetables, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards, wellness

The Path To Wellness Isn’t Easy

How many tines do you feel like for all your good intentions and healthy changes to behavior , you’d like to feel a bit more happy or healthy or have more well in your #Wellness goal?

Well, you’re not alone.

Why is it that despite all the meditation , eating healthy, exercising as best as you can especially if your suffering from chronic pain or a chronic condition , eating kale making smoothies and protein shakes, you seem to spend most days feeling run-down and uncomfortable?

For me that’s Hashimoto thyroiditis.

Plus my adrenals are fatigued making my already slow thyroid work even harder. It just gets so tiring.

I miss that none stop energy I had. I was able to work 8-10 hr days come home get dinner , clean our pool with my husband, have a small patio garden, clean the house , shop etc…..

Now I am exhausted after I do some errands and ride my recumbent bike for 15-20 min.

Again I’m told it’s the Hashimoto

I get sick of mixed messages one Dr. says one thing and the other says another.

I have been told I don’t eat enough. I have been told I eat to much

Drink more water – yes this one is true and I’m working on it.

Eat this

Don’t eat this

High carb

Low carb

Eat your greens , don’t eat your greens

I just get so sick of it .

I know how to eat healthy, I never really ate horrible. I gained weight first after my mom died. Because food soothed me at the time. I was grieving. I knew I wasn’t eating how I should back then.

After working through that and trying to exercise nothing.

Still tired , still carrying a few extra pounds

I tried Atkins and it was just for me more meat than I cared to eat.

I tried a few other things and same ok same ol.

A few year ago I bought some dvds and worked hard and I mean hard.

So hard I tore my meniscus leading to osteonecrosis in the knee that already was a pain in the ass by having osteoarthritis.

And I won’t mention how bad spondylolisthesis pain is.

I have always been a veggie lover. And I prefer veggies.

You’d think switching to plant based would have blasted any fat off me sine it’s been a year plus.

Nope I lose 5 here 10 there then gain 2 back. Over and over.

Again I’m told it’s my Hashimoto

I’ve had hypothyroidism for 20 years and the levothyroxine always made me feel like crap.

No one ever listened when I told them this. I remember telling my Dr. I feel like my body is fighting against me. Most of just looked at me.

Here I was right my body was attacking me.

That’s Hashimoto – I found this out maybe a month ago.

Finally I feel vindicated !!

Even before I went to plant based I didn’t eat horrible.

Sure 1 night or 2 was fast food but not the golden arch kind. Fast food to me meant I was not cooking. I would buy baked fish or on occasion a good spaghetti dinner.

It was going to decent restaurants ordering dinner.

Yes I know they have a shit load of salt in them. But that can’t be the only thing keeping this damn weight on.

Maybe someday these restaurants will get with it and cut their salt by at least half.

And then there’s adrenal fatigue

So what is Adrenal fatigue?

Adrenal fatigue is a potential result of not eating enough and or not eating enough of the “right” foods and the hormone imbalances that creates. While many people don’t fully understand it, the theory is simple it will make you feel tired.

I learned all this from my Naturopath and the Registered Dietician I see.

‘Adrenal fatigue is also a big topic  which comes from calorie restriction for too long throughout the year.

‘Calorie restriction is fine for short periods of time but unfortunately people are looking for body fat loss 12 months a year and the body hates that. Your body is smart and will adapt, so goals become very hard to reach in that state.’

Now What is Hashimoto?

Hashimoto is a condition that arises when the immune system attacks – and damages – the thyroid gland.

Over time, the thyroid gland, which straddles your windpipe at the front your neck, becomes unable to produce enough thyroid hormone so it becomes under-active.

As one of the primary functions of thyroid hormone is to keep your cells – and you – active, if you have insufficient amounts of the stuff, your body will slow down.

Say hello to tiredness and tighter fitting clothing.

“Hypothyroidism is a slow burner and it very easily can go undetected, and often misdiagnosed as depression.

Hashimoto cannot be cured but, symptoms can be managed with medications, designed to rebalance the levels of thyroid hormone in the body.

Did you know 75% of people with Hashimoto are lactose intolerant? some people also find that avoiding gluten can help.

Well I meditate to help manage stress , I cut out daily and I am working on the gluten free area. Some days are harder than others.

A few ways I’m learning to alleviate Hashimoto symptoms through diet.

1. Support the thyroid -This means stripping your diet back to basics – Reduce your consumption of caffeine, sugar, alcohol and refined carbohydrates, which are common triggers for thyroid problems.

2. Avoid Soy

Steer clear of soy products such as soy sauce, tamari and miso,” even the fermented, organic and non-GMO types. “They can impact your cell receptors and disrupt feedback through your hormone system.

3. Eat greens in moderation

It might sound counter-intuitive but, when it comes to thyroid problems, these act as goitrogens this means they interfere with the uptake of iodine by the thyroid gland and, therefore, the production of thyroid hormones.

“I’m a big fan of green veggies so don’t feel like I can never have them,

I enjoy vegetables in the brassica family (broccoli, cauliflower, some kale and Brussels sprouts) cooked well rather than raw, as heat inactivates the goitrogenic compounds.

Other foods to watch out for? Soybeans, millet, strawberries, peanuts, turnips and watercress.Everything I love.

4.Time to love my Adrenals

High cortisol (which is pumped from the adrenals) is directly linked to lower thyroid function so managing stress levels is essential.

5. I take a probiotic every day.

6. I am a flexitarian so I will eat meat or fish 1x a week.

So I have learned meditation, qigong, I love walks in nature and time switched off from social media. People actually get pissed off at me when I don’t respond right away!! I mean really ?! I also practice deep-belly breathing every day.

I am still tired just not totally exhausted.

I just want to feel better get this weight off because that will help my bone conditions also.

I hate feeling like this. I’m sick of feeling so tired.

I’m a happy person who likes to stay busy.

I shouldn’t feel so tired by 3pm

I get frustrated because I am sick of carrying this extra weight around.

My Naturopath feels I’m biking to hard. And suggested I slow the pace down and go longer.

So I bike longer slower , I like it better. I’m not as tired afterwards.

So tweaking more things.

I hope someday I find that sweet spot that revs up my thyroid helps the adrenals and I can feel great and get this fat off my ass once and for all.

I will continue to eat mostly plant based. The other benefit it has is it’s helped my bone pain . I still get it just not 24/7

I do love to meditate and I also enjoy qigong.

One day at a time is all we can do.

Well here’s to wellness!!

Have a great day.

Deb Andio