Posted in Awareness, Bone and Joint Health

Winter and Joint Pain

Do achy joints plague you during the coldest months? Does it seem like your knees, hips, and ankles feel sore whenever snow is falling?

It’s not your imagination! Winter weather—particularly cold—can cause slow, achy joints, making it hard to get moving. If you’re looking for winter joint pain relief, here are eight tips to help you avoid the discomfort brought on by the cold.

But first, it helps to understand why winter aches and pains happen.

Why Cold Weather Make our Bones and Joints Ache

There are several reasons why winter weather may cause joints to feel achy. The cold naturally makes muscles feel more tensed up and tight.

This tension may lead to less mobility and less flexibility in the joints. Some studies also link changes in joints to changes in the barometric pressure, dry air, and other winter-related issues.

The jury is still on that one but ask anyone who lives with joint pain and they will tell you: they are weather predators

Cold is very uncomfortable, and the discomfort makes us painfully aware of every twinge and ache. So, if you’re ready to combat winter joint pain, here are a few tips for winter joint pain relief to help you feel better when blustery temperatures settle in.

Drink Water 💧

Hydration is important but it’s especially vital in the winter months. People often think of drinking more water when it’s sunny and warm, but in the winter, dry air makes you feel dehydrated, tired, and achy. Don’t neglect your water intake! I am trying to get more water also, because honestly I am terrible at it.

If you aren’t a fan of plain water, sipping a cup of warm herbal tea is an excellent way to get more hydration in the winter. Bone broth and soup are also hydrating options. Aim for about six to eight glasses of water per day, more if you are working out and active.

EAT A HEALTHY, BALANCED DIET 🥗

A healthy diet is essential year-round. In the winter months, a well-balanced diet will keep your body much healthier than a lifestyle of processed junk food.

Eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, legumes and beans lean meats, and whole grains. Avoid processed foods and foods high in sugar and saturated fat. If you are sensitive to certain foods, consult with your physician about determining the best course of action. If you can afford it see a dietician and they can help you get on the right path.

KEEP MOVING

It’s vital to keep your body active, even in the winter months. While you shouldn’t work through significant joint pain without the assistance of a medical professional, stiff or achy joints shouldn’t mean canceling your gym membership.

Often, we feel less motivated and more inclined to stay home, where it’s cozy and warm during the winter. Netflix and the couch seem to beckon, especially when a brisk walk means bundling up in layers, but you can walk in a mall indoors. Low impact activity will keep your joints healthy. Try indoor swimming in a warm pool, stretching with yoga or Pilates, brisk walking, and weight training to keep your body active and fit. But remember it’s also ok to not be ok once in a while. We all need to rest and recharge. Listen to your body.

TRY TO AVOID WINTER WEIGHT GAIN

Hand-in-hand with winter often comes weight gain. 5-7 Over the holidays, healthy habits tend to slide a bit, with many people packing on extra weight. Then we add frigid temps , hibernation and before you know it we gained 8-12 lbs in a winter. That doesn’t help our joints. Although the average is 3-6 pounds even a small amount of excess weight will start to affect your knees and other joints.

If you feel like you need to rein it in after the holidays, or your eating more than usual because you hit the winter blues talk to your doctor, if you have a bad relationship with food seek a counselor or a 12 step OA meeting.

INQUIRE ABOUT SUPPLEMENTS AND OTHER TREATMENTS

Curious about joint health supplements and treatments? Always consult with your physician on the best plan for your body. Taking over-the-counter pain relievers and anti-inflammatory medications may be necessary, but only under the supervision of a physician. Many supplements and medications can result in unwanted side effects. And many cannot take NSAIDS.

Follow through on your physician’s recommendations for any vitamins (such as vitamin D) that may get low once the weather gets cold. Your doctor will help you figure out the best course of action for winter joint pain relief.

If you’re concerned that your winter joint pain is more than cold weather, call your doctor right away.

Disclaimer

This blog provides general information and discussions about health and related subjects. The information and other content provided in this blog, website or in any linked materials are not intended and should not be considered, or used as a substitute for, medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This blog does not constitute the practice of any medical, nursing or other professional health care advice, diagnosis or treatment. And cannot diagnose conditions, provide second opinions or make specific treatment recommendations through this blog or website.

If you or any other person has a medical concern, you should consult with your health care provider or seek other professional medical treatment immediately. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something that you have read on this blog, website or in any linked materials. If you are experiencing a medical emergency, please call 911 or call for emergency medical help on the nearest telephone immediately.

Posted in Awareness, Blessed, Life

Goodbye 2021 Hello To 2022

Another year ends

2021 is almost gone. Salute to the experience you had in that year, and welcome 2022 with all the guts and glory.

Many things you’ve learned in the year 2021 some of happiness and some some of hurt and some of love. May your 2022 be full of surprises and blessings and love and great fortune goodbye 2021 welcome 2022!

God bless you and good vibes and thanks for following me and stopping by.

See you next year

Deb

ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com

Posted in awards,patient leader, Awareness, WEGO Health

I have been nominated and need your help.

I have been nominated in the 10th annual WEGO Health Awards 2021 and would appreciate if you could take 1 minute of your time and endorse me.

I have been an advocate for over 30 years.

My journey began by advocating for survivors of Domestic Violence

I worked in a Battered Women’s Shelter and Rape Crisis Center for over a decade and went from monitoring the crisis line to becoming a DV shelter manager that ran a support group for women in and out of shelter. I spoke to women in correctional facilities, because often they have been abused at some point in their life.

I spoke to high schools so teenagers boys and girls would know the signs of being in a potentially abusive or controlling relationship.

I also explained date rape etc and how important it is to tell someone what happened and also tell them it was not their fault.

I also began advocating for bone and joint pain and joint health after I was diagnosed with osteoarthritis at age 35 and at age 51 after a meniscus injury landed me with yet another painful diagnosis; Osteonecrosis in my knee.

I am a fairly new facilitator for the Arthritis Foundation LiveYes Connect group in Boardman, Ohio , I also am a Arthritis Ambassador for the AF as of March 2021.

After my Osteonecrosis-aka Avascular Necrosis diagnosis I felt alone and afraid with yet another bone and joint condition was scary , I was told I had bone death. The Ortho told me there was nothing that can be done just live in pain until the knee collapses then he would replace it. I was definitely getting another opinion.

Whatt was even more scary was that many of the orthopedic doctors I saw rarely heard of it and never or rarely treated it. This left me even more concerned. You cannot have a good quality of life if you cannot find good medical care.

So I started my own support group which is worldwide and has over 1500 people in it from all over the world.

Each of those members is offered a free booklet that I wrote about Osteonecrosis so they and their family can understand that there is hope, there is treatment and unfortunately there often times is disability. But they need to know they not alone and their family can also educate themselves on the condition.

I joined WEGO Health about 7 years ago, because it was a great organization and it allowed me to advocate on a different platform. I also educated myself on other conditions and I have met some fantastic individuals, who work so hard in their advocacy.

The link below is so you can scroll and click endorse also there are several awareness links that I also have for you to view and feel free to follow me.

https://www.wegohealth.com/Chronicallygratefuldebla/awards

I appreciate your support

Thank you so very much. Wishing you a pain free day

Deb Andio

Posted in Advocate, Arthritis, Awareness

Ways to help stop the Zoom Intruders

As an advocate for arthritis and a Facilitator to the Live Yes Connect Group and Founder of the International Support group Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis Support Int’l

I use Zoom a lot: as a person back in school I again use Zoom a lot: talking with family , friends and attending other meetings yep zoom again ! So it’s great to have tips to have a more secure meeting, because we all know there will be some clown or troubled individual- intruding in a meeting.

Here are things I do and have learned in my zoom calls to stop ZB aka Zoom Intruders

Ways to have a safe meeting.

Always always always make sure your Zoom Account is up to date. Here’s how – Sign in to Zoom desktop client. Click your profile picture then click Check for Updates. If there is a newer version, Zoom will download and install it.


Create a waiting room –

The Waiting Room is just like it sounds: It’s a virtual staging area that prevents people from joining a meeting until the host is ready. Meeting hosts can customize the Waiting Room settings to gain further control over which participants join a specific meeting and when.

When it comes to video conferencing security best practices, Waiting Rooms are extremely useful for protecting meetings that have external participants

Only have one person screen share
Stop other participants from screen sharing
Click the arrow next to “Share Screen” in the host controls at the bottom of the Zoom screen, then select “Advanced Sharing Options” and make sure the option to “Who Can Share?” is set to “Host Only”.

Lock the room once meeting starts or with in a couple minutes after it starts – If you start a meeting and everyone you expect to join has, you can lock the meeting from new participants. While the meeting is running, navigate to the bottom of the screen and click Participants. The Participants panel will open. At the bottom, choose More > Lock Meeting.

If a non welcome person comes in You can kick them out.

To kick someone out: During the call, go to the Participants pane on the right. Hover over the name of the person you want to boot and when options appear, choose Remove.
By default, an ousted guest cannot rejoin. What to do if you make a mistake? You can allow a booted party to rejoin. Enable this feature by going to the web portal and navigating to Settings > Meeting > In-Meeting (Basic). Toggle on the setting called Allow removed participants to rejoin.

Disable Someone’s Camera
Hosts can turn off any participant’s camera. If someone is being rude or inappropriate on video, or their video has some technical problem, the host can open the Participants panel and click on the video camera icon next to the person’s name.

Prevent Animated GIFs and Other Files in the Chat
In the chat area of a Zoom meeting, participants can share files, including images and animated GIFs—if you let them. If you’d rather not, then be sure to disable file transfer. It’s on by default, so you have to actively disable it.
For your own meetings, open Settings in the Zoom web app (it’s not in the desktop app). On the left side, go to Personal > Settings. Then click In Meeting (Basic). Scroll down a little farther until you see File Transfer. That’s where you can disable it.

Turn off File Transfer
This will stop jerks from uploading porn through the in-meeting text-chat function. Go to Account Management > Account Settings > Meeting > File Transfer.
The Zoom blog posting has many more tips, including a few that are for paid Zoom accounts only, such as making the meeting invitation-only and requiring attendees to log in with a password.

I know many accounts are free so there is a time limit of I think 60 minutes . But there are excellent ways to secure a meeting.

Some will always fall through the cracks but it’s an excellent way to have a more secure meeting.

Wishing you a happy pain free day 🌸

Deb

Posted in Awareness, Blessed, Chronic Pain, Grateful

Happy New Year

Being an advocate for bone and joint pain and personally living with osteoarthritis osteonecrosis and spondylolisthesis pain .

I saw our community struggle in new and ways besides living and dealing with daily pain.

People suddenly couldn’t access routine care because of lockdowns, fear and added anxiety.

They became more isolated than ever before. They and their family members faced job losses and financial hardship.

As an advocate for arthritis and a facilitator for my local LIVE YES Connect Group, I had to cancel or postpone in-person programs and events.

But on the plus side we went virtual on Zoom

Some members and their families faced added strain, whether dealing with virtual school or safety concerns for loved ones in nursing homes.

It’s a year most are happy to see come to an end.

But as a person with pain, I am always compelled to find silver linings. Even in the mist of challenging of times.

In 2020, I got to travel to Washington D.C participate in a focus group and then speak on Capital Hill.

I met some fantastic people from our state representatives to other leaders and advocates who work so hard to create a strong support system for so many causes and conditions.

I got to stay in a great city and tour the beautiful historical city of Washington D.C

We made great strides in accessibility, as health care system finally embraced telehealth and more companies allowed remote work.

Many disabled now gave hope to possibly getting a part time job working from home now because we see it is doable.

We seen a President work tirelessly to get pharmaceutical companies to create a vaccine quickly that will be safe for the USA and world.

We gave witnessed the power of science and innovation with the development of promising treatments and vaccines.

We saw our neighbors and communities come together to support one another in their time of need.

Despite the news only showing negativity there was a lot of positive happening.

2020 shown how resilient we are. And to never lose faith. Be grateful for everyday.

I don’t know what 2021 will bring;

I’m hoping it will be a fantastic year.

I just want to Thank you for your support, and following me on IG, Blog, and all social media platforms I promise to bring you current and uplifting information in 2021 and I wish you all a safe, healthy, prosperous and happy new year

Deb

http://www.ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com

avascularnecrosiseducationcom

Posted in Awareness

Today is Avascular Necrosis Osteonecrosis Awareness Day

Today is a special day for me , it’s the second annual Avascular Necrosis Osteonecrosis Awareness Day.

The am still working hard to get every state to work with the others so we all have one date to raise awareness and bring recognition to the painful disease called Osteonecrosis which goes by several others names.

It’s a slow yet rewarding experience

More people are learning about Osteonecrosis , what it is how you get it in many cases. And that’s what it’s all about. To get people to listen to us, learn about it. That way we can get better options for treatment and pain.

Some of the faces of AVN women is this picture

Osteonecrosis

Avascular Necrosis

SONK

SPONK

Ischemic Necrosis

Aseptic Necrosis

Legg Calves Perthes – Avn children

Kienbock’s Disease Avn wrist

Kümmell disease Avn in vertebrate

ONJ Osteonecrosis of the Jaw

and so many more …….

Osteonecrosis is a disease caused by reduced blood flow to bones in the joints. In people with healthy bones, new bone is always replacing old bone. In osteonecrosis, the lack of blood causes the bone to break down faster than the body can make enough new bone. The bone starts to die and may break down.

You can have osteonecrosis in one or several bones. It is most common in the upper leg. Other common sites are your upper arm and your knees, shoulders and ankles. The disease can affect men and women of any age, but it usually strikes in your thirties, forties or fifties. 

At first, you might not have any symptoms. As the disease progresses , you will probably have joint pain that becomes more severe. You may not be able to bend or move the affected joint very well.

No one is sure what causes the disease. Risk factors include 

  • Long-term steroid treatment
  • Alcohol misuse
  • Joint injuries
  • Having certain diseases, including arthritis and cancer

Doctors use imaging tests and other tests to diagnose osteonecrosis. Treatments include medicines, using crutches, limiting activities that put weight on the affected joints, electrical stimulation and surgery.

To read more about Osteonecrosis go to

http://avascularnecrosiseducation.com

Posted in Awareness, Bible, Blessed

God will never give us a schedule so full that’s there is no time for him

You want success meditate in Gods word in the day and in the night. Just 10 minutes a day

It will change your life

Essentials of Meditation on Gods Word

Reading

Believing

Absorbing it

Applying to life

Obeying

I acknowledge that he is my God and I commit myself to God.

Read

Joshua 1:9

Just read it and absorb it.

Watch what God will do in your life .

How many blessings have we missed because we think we got everything handled.

It takes courage to be obedient to god.

Because sometimes we just don’t understand it. But keep reading just 5-10 minutes 2x a day

Read proverbs- if you read one proverb a day it will take you a month,

the book of psalms will take 6-8 months

Try it I know it will change your life.

Posted in Awareness

Dealing with Joint Pain in the Pandemic

How do I deal with my knee and back pain until the orthopedic doctors start seeing patients again?

There are a variety of non-operative treatment options for pain. No one treatment is going to help everyone, and patients need to find the treatments that seem to work the best for them.

Medications I personally cannot take NSAIDS so I reach for

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is an over-the-counter option that is safe and effective for me.

For many Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) – e.g. Ibuprofen and naproxen – may also be helpful. Prescription NSAIDs are also an option to discuss with your health care provider.

Some say medical marijuana helps them. I’ve never tried it so I cannot comment.

Supplements, such as glucosamine/chondroitin, are generally safe and may be helpful in reducing some arthritic pain. Also talk to you doctor about curcumin supplements tablets .

I drink Turmeric tea aka golden milk it is a natural anti-inflammatory agent.

Exercise helps me. I’m not talking about running or walking a marathon.

Just 1-2 miles once or twice a day. Makes me feel good especially in summer. My joints love the heat.

I have a daily exercise regimen, specifically designed for me and my knee osteonecrosis osteoarthritis, and this back pain that is really an out of the blue pain.

With osteonecrosis moving is critically important for maintaining strength in muscles supporting the joints , reducing pain and it’s also great for stress.

It is important to be as active as your joints allow and find a variety of stretching and strengthening exercises that you perform daily, without increasing your pain.

A good source for exercise instruction for arthritis may be found at you ortho office maybe they can email you some ideas.

Crutches, a walker, ice/heat treatments and a knee brace may also be helpful in managing your hip and/or knee pain.

Weight Loss and Diet

The covid 19 is a little saying that explains what is happened to many since the pandemic.

And extra 19 pounds can cause the joints to really hurt.

Many patients with osteonecrosis and arthritis are carrying a few extra pounds and weight loss reduces stress across our joints.

We put 3-5X our body weight across our hip and knee joints with activity, particularly stair climbing and getting in and out of a chair. Every 10 pounds of extra weight carried results in 50 pounds of weight bearing pressure across the hips and knees!

A healthy diet is important for general health and weight loss, and some may find benefit from focusing on an “anti-inflammatory” diet. The anti-inflammatory diet is a diet which includes tomatoes, olive oil, green leafy vegetables, nuts, fatty fish, and fresh fruit, particularly blueberries, strawberries, cherries and oranges. Foods thought to cause inflammation, and to avoid, include white bread and pastries, French fries, soda, margarine and red meat.

In summary: stay active, eat healthy, maintain social distancing as instructed and maintain a positive attitude.

Please know that your orthopedic provider and all pcp ‘s are also anxious to get back to “business as usual” and help you to resolve your arthritic pain!

Check out my other posts on great recipes

Please follow like and share to get updates on my latest posts

Wishing you love, good health and a pain free day

Love

Deb

https://flexitarianforlife.wordpress.com/

http://www.ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com

Posted in Awareness

Arthritis Pain Do’s and Don’ts

Arthritis pain:

The Do’s and The don’ts

Will physical activity reduce or increase your arthritis pain? Get tips on exercise and other common concerns when coping with arthritis symptoms and arthritis pain.

Arthritis is a leading cause of pain and disability worldwide. You can find plenty of advice about easing the pain of arthritis and other conditions with exercise, medication and stress reduction. How do you know what will work for you?

Here are some do’s and don’ts to help you figure it out

Basics

Whatever your condition, it will be easier to stay ahead of your pain if you:

• Learn all you can about your condition, including what type of arthritis you have and whether any of your joints are already damaged

• Enlist your doctor, friends and family in managing your pain

• Tell your doctor if your pain changes

Everyday routines

Pay attention to your joints, whether sitting, standing or engaging in activity. When we have pain the last thing we want to do is move but often what we should be doing.

• Keep your joints moving. Do daily, gentle stretches that move your joints through their full range of motion.

• Use good posture. A physical therapist can show you how to sit, stand and move correctly.

• Know your limits. Balance activity and rest, and don’t overdo it.

In addition, lifestyle changes are important for easing pain.

• Manage weight. Being overweight can increase complications of arthritis and contribute to more arthritis pain. Making incremental, permanent lifestyle changes resulting in gradual weight loss is often the most effective method of weight management.

• Quit smoking. If you smoke stop. It’s not that hard , I quit smoking and so can you. Smoking causes stress on connective tissues, which can increase arthritis pain.Smoking also slows down the healing process as well as it’s a nasty stinky habit.

Exercise

When you have arthritis, movement can decrease your pain and stiffness, improve your range of motion, strengthen your muscles, and increase your endurance.

What to do

Choose the right kinds of activities those that build the muscles around your joints but don’t damage the joints themselves. A physical or occupational therapist can help you develop an exercise program that’s right for you.

Don’t just go start jogging if you have knee problems or lifting weights if you have back and joint issues.

Always consult your doctor before doing anything!!

Once you get the ok.

Focus on stretching, range-of-motion exercises and gradual progressive strength training. Include low-impact aerobic exercise, such as walking, cycling or water exercises, to improve your mood and help control your weight.

What to avoid

Avoid activities that involve high impact and repetitive motion, such as:

• Running

• Jumping

• Tennis

• High-impact aerobics

• Repeating the same movement, such as a tennis serve, again and again

Medications

Many types of medications are available for arthritis pain relief. Most are relatively safe, but no medication is completely free of side effects. Talk with your doctor to formulate a medication plan for your specific pain symptoms.

What to do

Over-the-counter pain medications, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen sodium (Aleve) can help relieve occasional pain triggered by activity your muscles and joints aren’t used to — such as gardening after a winter indoors. But not everyone can take certain medications again talk to your doctor.

Cream containing capsaicin may be applied to skin over a painful joint to relieve pain, do not use if you have a scratch, cut or open wound. Use alone or with oral medication.

Consult your doctor if over-the-counter medications don’t relieve your pain.

What to avoid

• Overtreatment. Talk with your doctor if you find yourself using over-the-counter pain relievers regularly.

• Undertreatment. Don’t try to ignore severe and prolonged arthritis pain. You might have joint inflammation or damage requiring daily medication.

• Focusing only on pain. Depression is more common in people with arthritis. Doctors have found that treating depression with antidepressants and other therapies reduces not only depression symptoms but also arthritis pain.

Physical and emotional integration

It’s no surprise that arthritis pain has a negative effect on your mood. If everyday activities make you hurt, you’re bound to feel discouraged. But when these normal feelings escalate to create a constant refrain of fearful, hopeless thoughts, your pain can actually get worse and harder to manage.

What to do

Therapies that interrupt destructive mind-body interactions include:

• Cognitive behavioral therapy. This well-studied, effective combination of talk therapy and behavior modification helps you identify — and break — cycles of self-defeating thoughts and actions.

• Relaxation therapy. Meditating, doing yoga, deep breathing, listening to music, being in nature, writing in a journal do whatever helps you relax. There’s no downside to relaxation, and it can help ease pain.

• Acupuncture. Some people get pain relief through acupuncture treatments, when a trained acupuncturist inserts hair-thin needles at specific points on your body. It can take several weeks before you notice improvement.

• Heat and cold. Use of heat, such as applying heating pads to aching joints, taking hot baths or showers, or immersing painful joints in warm paraffin wax, can help relieve pain temporarily. Be careful not to burn yourself. Use heating pads for no more than 20 minutes at a time.
Use of cold, such as applying ice packs to sore muscles, can relieve pain and inflammation after strenuous exercise.

• Massage. Massage might improve pain and stiffness temporarily. Make sure your massage therapist knows where your arthritis affects you.

What to avoid

• Smoking. If you’re addicted to tobacco, you might use it as an emotional coping tool. But it’s counterproductive: Toxins in smoke cause stress on connective tissue, leading to more joint problems.

• A negative attitude. Negative thoughts are self-perpetuating. As long as you dwell on them, they escalate, which can increase your pain and risk of disability. Instead, distract yourself with activities you enjoy, spend time with people who support you and consider talking to a therapist.

Wishing you a pain free day

Deb

Posted in Awareness

Rare Week In Washington DC

I had an amazing experience participating in Rare Week in Washington DC.

I arrived Feb 25 and left Feb 29, 2020.

Rare Disease Week on Capitol Hill brings rare disease community members from across the country together to be educated on federal legislative issues, meet other advocates, and share their unique stories with legislators.

I arrived empowered and I left empowered and my advocacy on on fire and I was exhausted and yet rejuvenated all at the same time.

This was my first time on Capitol Hill and it will not be my last.

I met so many amazing people.

I also participated in a focus group which was the main reason why I went but the opportunity cane to go a few days earlier and I took advantage of that time.

hosted by the Rare Disease Legislative Advocates (RDLA), a program of the EveryLife Foundation for Rare Diseases, is designed to educate and activate advocates and to foster relationships within the community.

900 RARE DISEASE ADVOCATES

393 MEETINGS WITH CONGRESS

227 PATIENT ORGANIZATIONS

1 AMAZING RARE DISEASE WEEK!

I spoke on Capitol Hill, Met one of my Senators for Ohio.

Spoke up about Osteonecrosis and how we need better treatment options like prp injections,stem cell injections, clinical trials and getting new treatments covered by insurance also I discussed osteoarthritis and how it can be debilitating as well.

I passed out 200 copies of my Osteonecrosis booklet to people on Capitol Hill thanked several for issuing proclamations for November 29 becoming Osteonecrosis Awareness Day in many States my goal Is all states.

I then toured that amazing and beautiful town of our nation’s capital.

Took a night tour that was amazing until a lady tripped and grabbed me causing me also to go down.

Blasted my knee and it looks like a water balloon but thank God it’s not broken.

Rare Week Capitol Hill February 2020

I had an amazing experience and I am so grateful I got the opportunity to go and I look for to being in Washington DC more often.

Posted in Awareness

Thank You Alabama

Grateful

We are moving along state by state

Alabama is giving us for rare disease awareness the week of February 20,2020 to February 27, 2020 as Avascular Necrosis Osteonecrosis Awareness Week!!!

And on November 29 Avascular Necrosis Osteonecrosis Awareness Day!!

Every state so far is coming on board!!

Thank you Lord

Deb Andio

Posted in Awareness, Bone Health

Fall Weather + Falling Temps = Joint Pain

Can you predict the weather based on how your joints feel?

Is it Cloudy with a chance of pain I your neck of the woods?

Can increased joint pain be caused by the weather?

In my opinion and experience absolutely

For every mile I walk in the fall feels like 2 on my knee joints especially when it’s below 45 degrees and the air is very dry.

When its fall and winter my bones sound like I am walking on a few leaves or twigs some days.

There is no one explanation for why dropping temperatures affect your joints.

One theory relates to drops in barometric pressure, which causes tendons, muscles, and the surrounding tissues to expand. Because of the confined space within the body, this can cause pain, especially in joints affected by osteoarthritis.

For me having Osteoarthritis and Osteonecrosis as well as Spondylolisthesis in my L5S1 this weather has been pretty painful for several years now. But I cannot allow it to keep me from moving.

In days I just want to stay under the blanket, I still make sure I move .

Sitting is a killer.

Thankfully I have found ways to help my pain

I take curcumin as well as a few years ago started to I eat a more plant based diet.

It’s not only helped my pain be less intense it’s also given me other benefits, lower blood pressure, lower cholesterol and triglycerides and my scale was lower.

Sure we need protein but for me I prefer mostly plant protein and occasionally eat chicken and fish and maybe 1x a month good quality red meat.

I have noticed a big improvement on how I feel also.

Less foggy , more energy and just overall more balanced.

I eat

  • Omega-3 fatty acids. Think fish and walnuts to curb inflammation. Avocados yummy!!
  • Vitamin K. Make meals that feature greens, such as spinach, kale, and cabbage, for their pain-soothing properties.
  • Vitamin C. Add color to your diet with juicy oranges, sweet red peppers and tomatoes, and other C-rich foods to halt cartilage loss (and resulting pain) that comes with arthritis
  • Spices Turmeric, Curcumin,Hot peppers, Sriracha I love all the heat and they have anti inflammatory properties that help with pain.

I avoid

Avoid foods high in omega-6 fatty acids, such as corn oil, which may trigger painful inflammation.

Also swap refined grains for more whole grain. research suggests refined grains have an inflammatory effect, whereas high-fiber whole grains may help reduce inflammation.

Keep Moving
One reason cold weather is linked to joint pain is people are less likely to exercise when it’s chilly and damp.

Being a couch potato is bad news for your joints because exercise helps lubricate them to prevent pain and it’s shown to age us faster.

I have a recumbent bike for indoors to help my joints stay moving.

I make sure I’m getting plenty of vitamin D to help keep my bones stay strong and prevent even morejoint pain.

I for a supplement with D3 (the kind your body manufactures from sunlight), but check with your doctor first because some supplements can interact with prescription and over-the-counter drugs.

Another thing I do is I keep my joints warm.

I love thermacare heat wraps.

Many ask me about what I eat in a day or what products I like.

So lasted this week I will let you know as I get my holiday favs ready.

I am not paid or endorsed in anyway.

These are things I like from personal experience.

Stay warm , and keep moving

Wishing you a pain free day