Posted in Awareness

Tis The Season To Feel Yucky

What is the difference between Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19?

Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus (called SARS-CoV-2) and flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses.

There are some key differences between Flu and COVID-19.

COVID-19 seems to spread more easily than flu and can cause more serious illnesses in some people. It can also take longer before people show symptoms and people can be contagious for longer. Another important difference is there is a vaccine to protect against flu. There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to the virus. More information about differences between flu and COVID-19 is available in the different sections below.

Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone, and testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis. Flu and COVID-19 share many characteristics, but there are some key differences between the two.

While more is learned every day, there is still a lot that is unknown about COVID-19 and the virus that causes it. This page compares COVID-19 and flu, given the best available information to date.

Similarities:

Both COVID-19 and flu can have varying degrees of signs and symptoms, ranging from no symptoms (asymptomatic) to severe symptoms. Common symptoms that COVID-19 and flu share include:

  • Fever or feeling feverish/chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle pain or body aches
  • Headache
  • Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults

Differences:

Flu

Flu viruses can cause mild to severe illness, including common signs and symptoms listed above.

Flu Symptoms

COVID-19

COVID-19 seems to cause more serious illnesses in some people. Other signs and symptoms of COVID-19, different from flu, may include change in or loss of taste or smell.

COVID-19 Symptoms

How long symptoms appear after exposure and infection

Similarities:

For both COVID-19 and flu, 1 or more days can pass between a person becoming infected and when he or she starts to experience illness symptoms.

Differences:

If a person has COVID-19, it could take them longer to develop symptoms than if they had flu.
Flu

Typically, a person develops symptoms anywhere from 1 to 4 days after infection.

Flu Symptoms

COVID-19

Typically, a person develops symptoms 5 days after being infected, but symptoms can appear as early as 2 days after infection or as late as 14 days after infection, and the time range can vary.

COVID-19 Symptoms

How long someone can spread the virus

Similarities:

For both COVID-19 and flu, it’s possible to spread the virus for at least 1 day before experiencing any symptoms.

Differences:

If a person has COVID-19, they may be contagious for a longer period of time than if they had flu.

Flu

Most people with flu are contagious for about 1 day before they show symptoms.

Older children and adults with flu appear to be most contagious during the initial 3-4 days of their illness but many remain contagious for about 7 days.

Infants and people with weakened immune systems can be contagious for even longer.

How Flu Spreads

COVID-19

How long someone can spread the virus that causes COVID-19 is still under investigation.

It’s possible for people to spread the virus for about 2 days before experiencing signs or symptoms and remain contagious for at least 10 days after signs or symptoms first appeared. If someone is asymptomatic or their symptoms go away, it’s possible to remain contagious for at least 10 days after testing positive for COVID-19.

How COVID-19 SpreadsTop of Page

How it Spreads

Similarities:

Both COVID-19 and flu can spread from person-to-person, between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet). Both are spread mainly by droplets made when people with the illness (COVID-19 or flu) cough, sneeze, or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

It may be possible that a person can get infected by physical human contact (e.g. shaking hands) or by touching a surface or object that has virus on it and then touching his or her own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes.

Both flu virus and the virus that causes COVID-19 may be spread to others by people before they begin showing symptoms, with very mild symptoms or who never developed symptoms (asymptomatic).

Differences:

While COVID-19 and flu viruses are thought to spread in similar ways, COVID-19 is more contagious among certain populations and age groups than flu. Also, COVID-19 has been observed to have more superspreading events than flu. This means the virus that causes COVID-19 can quickly and easily spread to a lot of people and result in continuous spreading among people as time progresses.

How Flu Spreads           How COVID-19 SpreadsTop of Page

People at High-Risk for Severe Illness

Similarities:

Both COVID-19 and flu illness can result in severe illness and complications. Those at highest risk include:

  • Older adults
  • People with certain underlying medical conditions
  • Pregnant people

Differences:

The risk of complications for healthy children is higher for flu compared to COVID-19. However, infants and children with underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for both flu and COVID-19.

Flu

Young children are at higher risk of severe illness from flu.

People at High Risk for Flu Complications

COVID-19

School-aged children infected with COVID-19 are at higher risk of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C), a rare but severe complication of COVID-19.

People at Increased Risk of COVID-19 Severe IllnessTop of Page

Complications

Similarities:

Both COVID-19 and flu can result in complications, including:

  • Pneumonia
  • Respiratory failure
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome (i.e. fluid in lungs)
  • Sepsis
  • Cardiac injury (e.g. heart attacks and stroke)
  • Multiple-organ failure (respiratory failure, kidney failure, shock)
  • Worsening of chronic medical conditions (involving the lungs, heart, nervous system or diabetes)
  • Inflammation of the heart, brain or muscle tissues
  • Secondary bacterial infections (i.e. infections that occur in people who have already been infected with flu or COVID-19)

Differences:

Flu

Most people who get flu will recover in a few days to less than two weeks, but some people will develop complications, some of these complications are listed above.

Flu complications

COVID-19

Additional complications associated with COVID-19 can include:

COVID-19 Emergency warning signsTop of Page

Approved Treatments

Similarities:

People at high-risk of complications or who have been hospitalized for COVID-19 or flu should receive supportive medical care to help relieve symptoms and complications.

Differences:

Flu

Prescription influenza antiviral drugs are FDA-approved to treat flu.

People who are hospitalized with flu or at high-risk of flu complications with flu symptoms are recommended to be treated with antiviral drugs as soon as possible.

Flu Treatment

COVID-19

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has developed guidance on treatment of COVID-19external icon, which will be regularly updated as new evidence on treatment options emerges.

While remdesivir is an antiviral agent that is being explored as a treatment for COVID-19 and is available under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA), there are currently no drugs or other therapeutics approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent or treat COVID-19. Studies are in progress to learn more.

What to Do If You Are Sick with COVID-19Top of Page

Vaccine

Similarities:

Vaccines for COVID-19 and flu must be approved or authorized for emergency use (EUA) by the FDA.

Differences:

Flu

There are multiple FDA-licensed influenza vaccines produced annually to protect against the 3 or 4 flu viruses that scientists anticipate will circulate each year.

Flu Vaccines

COVID-19

Currently there is no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. Vaccine developers and other researchers and manufacturers are expediting the development of a vaccine to prevent COVID-19.

Prevent Getting Sick with COVID-19

References

CDC flu https://www.cdc.gov/flu/index.htm

CDC covid19 https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html

Posted in Awareness

Dealing with Joint Pain in the Pandemic

How do I deal with my knee and back pain until the orthopedic doctors start seeing patients again?

There are a variety of non-operative treatment options for pain. No one treatment is going to help everyone, and patients need to find the treatments that seem to work the best for them.

Medications I personally cannot take NSAIDS so I reach for

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is an over-the-counter option that is safe and effective for me.

For many Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) – e.g. Ibuprofen and naproxen – may also be helpful. Prescription NSAIDs are also an option to discuss with your health care provider.

Some say medical marijuana helps them. I’ve never tried it so I cannot comment.

Supplements, such as glucosamine/chondroitin, are generally safe and may be helpful in reducing some arthritic pain. Also talk to you doctor about curcumin supplements tablets .

I drink Turmeric tea aka golden milk it is a natural anti-inflammatory agent.

Exercise helps me. I’m not talking about running or walking a marathon.

Just 1-2 miles once or twice a day. Makes me feel good especially in summer. My joints love the heat.

I have a daily exercise regimen, specifically designed for me and my knee osteonecrosis osteoarthritis, and this back pain that is really an out of the blue pain.

With osteonecrosis moving is critically important for maintaining strength in muscles supporting the joints , reducing pain and it’s also great for stress.

It is important to be as active as your joints allow and find a variety of stretching and strengthening exercises that you perform daily, without increasing your pain.

A good source for exercise instruction for arthritis may be found at you ortho office maybe they can email you some ideas.

Crutches, a walker, ice/heat treatments and a knee brace may also be helpful in managing your hip and/or knee pain.

Weight Loss and Diet

The covid 19 is a little saying that explains what is happened to many since the pandemic.

And extra 19 pounds can cause the joints to really hurt.

Many patients with osteonecrosis and arthritis are carrying a few extra pounds and weight loss reduces stress across our joints.

We put 3-5X our body weight across our hip and knee joints with activity, particularly stair climbing and getting in and out of a chair. Every 10 pounds of extra weight carried results in 50 pounds of weight bearing pressure across the hips and knees!

A healthy diet is important for general health and weight loss, and some may find benefit from focusing on an “anti-inflammatory” diet. The anti-inflammatory diet is a diet which includes tomatoes, olive oil, green leafy vegetables, nuts, fatty fish, and fresh fruit, particularly blueberries, strawberries, cherries and oranges. Foods thought to cause inflammation, and to avoid, include white bread and pastries, French fries, soda, margarine and red meat.

In summary: stay active, eat healthy, maintain social distancing as instructed and maintain a positive attitude.

Please know that your orthopedic provider and all pcp ‘s are also anxious to get back to “business as usual” and help you to resolve your arthritic pain!

Check out my other posts on great recipes

Please follow like and share to get updates on my latest posts

Wishing you love, good health and a pain free day

Love

Deb

https://flexitarianforlife.wordpress.com/

http://www.ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com

Posted in Awareness

What Really Helps Arthritis

If you’re asking yourself- what can help my arthritis, I will try to clear up a few of the most popular misconceptions for you.

Here’s are a list of the most common questions about Arthritis and the facts about what can help arthritis pain.

1. Fact or Fiction? There is no cure for arthritis

True. There is no cure for arthritis; however, the discomfort and pain can be managed through medication, heat, splints, braces, adaptive devices and learning new ways to accomplish everyday tasks and activities.

2. Fact or Fiction? The weather makes a difference in how my joints feel

Fact. There’s a reason people move to Arizona. Dry, warm weather reduces joint pain. When the humidity is high and barometric pressure is low, particularly just before a storm, if you have arthritis you may feel increased pain or stiffness. If you live in a hot, humid climate, a dehumidifier in your home can help.  Most air conditioning systems also help reduce humidity, run it during the day and even overnight to help you sleep comfortably.

3. Fact or Fiction? My diet makes a difference in my arthritis symptoms and how I feel

Fact. Excess weight puts more stress on your joints. Keeping your weight in check helps protect them. Eating a balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables and a mix of grains and proteins makes good sense for everyone.

4. Fact or Fiction? I can’t exercise because I have arthritis

Fiction. Movement, including gently stretching, is important to increase strength and flexibility. Exercising also reduces the pain and stiffness in your joints. I love my recumbent bike.

You just have to think about how you work out. If running aggravates the arthritis in your knees and makes them ache, switch to a less intense and less weight-bearing exercise like swimming, biking or yoga.

Always consult with your health care provider before starting an exercise program.

5. Fact or Fiction? Nothing will reduce the pain of my arthritis

Fiction. Heat, ice, prescription and non-prescription medicines, topical ointments and splints can all help alleviate the pain and swelling associated with arthritis.

Cold and heat can both help when dealing with arthritis pain. Using heat in the morning relaxes muscles and reduces stiffness.

Using ice at night lessens joint inflammation for most people.

I personally like the heat from thermacare heat wraps. My joints just don’t tolerate cold.

Over-the-counter medications and prescription drugs can also be very beneficial in helping to control arthritis pain.

Non-prescription medications, including aspirin, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen, help control pain and swelling. But everyone can’t take them. Example you cannot take NSAIDS if you have had bariatric surgery. So always talk to your doctor.

Prescription medications, like COX-2 inhibitors, anti-TNF compounds, steroids, and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) help reduce swelling and pain and can prevent further damage. However steroids are known to cause Avascular Necrosis- Osteonecrosis

Speak with your health care provider or pharmacist to make sure you are taking the right medication, even nonprescription drugs can be harmful or ineffective if you are not taking them correctly or if they may cause an interaction with your other medications

Posted in Awareness

Eat Them Veggies

Eat them veggies

As long as you’re cracking them eggs, add some veggies like bell peppers, mushrooms, or spinach into the mix.

And any veggie goes down easier in a thick and delicious, creamy smoothie

Stir-fry’s are a great way to load up on the veggies . Toss all your favorites into a hot wok. Carrots, celery,red peppers,sugar snaps, and even cabbage add sweetness and taste amazing.

Why order in from your local Chinese place when you can make a healthier stir-fry in your own kitchen?

Veggie Stir Fry

Ingredients

1 pound firm tofu

8-10 cups sliced vegetables Aprox 1 cup each (I use yellow onions, carrots, peppers, mushrooms, celery, broccoli, asparagus, water chestnuts,bamboo shoots)

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 cups cooked rice or 3 cups cooked quinoa

Sauce:

1/4 cup veggie or chicken stock

1/4 cup natural soy sauce (low sodium if you prefer)or gf tamari

2 cloves garlic, pressed

1 tablespoons light brown sugar

1 tablespoon finely chopped ginger root

1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

1 teaspoon arrowroot powder

Instructions

Slice the tofu in 1/2 inch slices. Press between layered paper towels or clean kitchen towels to dry well. Cut slices into 1-inch cubes. Arrange on a plate with prepared vegetables, separated by variety.

Combine sauce ingredients except for arrowroot powder in a small bowl and stir until sugar is dissolved. Mix arrowroot powder with just enough cold water to dissolve in a custard cup or teacup (you’ll use less than 2 tsp water). Add to sauce, stir well and set aside.

Preheat a wok or large skillet.

Add the oil and vegetables (add the sturdier vegetables first, adding the more tender ones after one minute and cook over medium-high heat until just crisp tender, stirring constantly.

Add the tofu and stir very carefully until the tofu is heated.

Stir sauce and pour around edge of wok. Stir vegetables around in sauce as it thickens.

Remove from heat as soon as sauce is thickened and serve over rice or quinoa.

Sure, you could set out crudités with a creamy dip. Or you could double the veggies and whip them into the dip, too. Dig into beautiful beet hummus, cucumber raita, or healthy, homemade spinach dip, replacing the cream with yogurt.

Roasting veggies can tease out flavors you wouldn’t get otherwise, and it couldn’t be easier. Preheat the oven to 450°F (230°C). Pile bite-sized pieces of cauliflower, broccoli, or Brussels sprout on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Toss to coat and spread out. Roast until tender-crisp and golden, about 20 minutes. Try it: Roast Pork with Apples & Brussels

Stuffed vegetables are pure comfort; fresh produce is just part of the package deal. Keep the stuffing healthy with lean ground meat or beans and whole grains, but don’t forget a small sprinkle of cheese.

These are cheesy and hearty and just the right amount of spicy. Easy to freeze.

Spicy Stuffed Peppers

Ingredients

Spicy Rice

• 1 tablespoon olive oil

• 1 medium yellow onion chopped

• 2 jalapeno peppers chopped

• 4 cloves garlic chopped

• 3/4 cups long grain rice

• 12 ounces fire roasted tomatoes (I used a store bought can)

• 1.5 cups vegetable broth + more as needed

• 1 cup frozen corn – or fresh corn if you can get it!

• ½ cup frozen peas

• 1 tablespoon Cajun seasonings

• 1 teaspoon cayenne powder

• ½ teaspoon cumin

• Salt and pepper to taste

FOR THE STUFFED PEPPERS

• 1 cup shredded cheese (Cheddar is good, or Colby or Pepper Jack)

• 4 bell peppers

• Hot Sauce, spicy chili flakes, fresh chopped herbs for serving

Instructions

Get the rice going. Heat a large pan to medium heat and add olive oil.
Add onion and jalapeno peppers and cook about 5 minutes to soften.

Add garlic and cook another minute, until you can smell the yummy garlic.Add the rice and stir. Cook for a couple minutes, stirring, to very lightly brown the rice.Add the fire roasted tomatoes and vegetable broth.

Stir.
Add corn, peas, Cajun seasonings, cayenne, cumin, salt and pepper, and hot sauce if using. Stir and bring to a quick boil.
Reduce heat and simmer for about 20 minutes, or until the rice has absorbed all of the liquid and is softened to your liking. If it needs more cooking, add a bit more broth and keep it simmering until you LOVE it.
While the rice is cooking, bring a large pot of water to a boil.Slice the tops off of the bell peppers and remove the innards. Boil them about 5 minutes to slightly soften.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.Mix the rice and shredded cheese together and stuff each pepper full. You may have extra stuffing, depending on the size of your peppers.

Bake on a large baking sheet for 30-40 minutes.Remove from heat and top with your favorite hot sauce, fresh chopped herbs and spicy chili flakes

Stir unsweetened pumpkin puree into your morning oats for a filling breakfast that will leave you longing for fall. The pumpkin’s orange color means it’s packed with beta-carotene, contributing to your daily intake of vitamin A.

Almost any veggie goes down easier in a thick and delicious, creamy smoothie,especially when it’s blended with citrus to balance out any bitterness. Add a big handful of kale, chard, or spinach to your morning smoothie and then flex a little, knowing that you started your day with extra iron.

Sweet potato banana smoothie

Ingredients

• 1/2 cup sweet potato purée note you can also use pumpkin purée

• 1 -2 bananas frozen, and chopped into 1 inch cubes

• 1 cup canned lite coconut milk

• 1 teaspoons maple syrup

• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

• 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

• 1/2 teaspoon fresh grated nutmeg

• 2 tablespoon walnuts, or pecans chopped

Directions

Place all ingredients, except for some of the walnuts into blender and blend until smooth. Top with chopped walnuts.

Avocado toast is cool, but there are so many other veggies you can drop on top of whole-wheat bread. Start with a swipe of part-skim ricotta or hummus, then add hydrating tomatoes and cucumbers. Or, pair sautéed mushrooms with a sunnyside-up egg. – https://www.redbookmag.com/food-recipes/news/a20060/12-things-you-should-be-putting-on-toast/

You might not associate muffins with green vegetables, but zucchini is sweet, mild, and full of moisture, making it surprisingly delicious in bread, muffins, or pancakes. Try it: Zucchini Muffins with Chocolate Chips

Carrots wilting in the crisper? Overwhelmed by a big bunch of kale? Soup’s on. Dice different veggies into a chunky stew, or blend your favorite root vegetable completely smooth. Plus, you can always upgrade chicken broth with a big handful of greens and squeeze of lemon. Try it: Green Soup with Cashew Cream Swirl

References

Redbookmag.com

Fitbitt.com blog

Posted in awards,patient leader, Awareness

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Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis

What your eating maybe worsening your Osteoarthritis

Your eating what?

Before you take one more bite of that fast food lunch or dinner consider how it affects your osteoarthritis.

Did you know that research shows that diets high in saturated fat – found in red meat, butter, cheese, lard and processed foods – can weaken knee cartilage, making it more prone to damage.

Yep so start eating more plants

There was a study in 2017 published in Arthritis Care & Research, researchers followed more than 2,000 patients with OA for up to four years, checking disease progression  and diet at yearly intervals. Participants who ate the most fat, especially the saturated kind, showed increasing joint damage, whereas those who ate healthy fats like olive oil and avocados had little disease progression.

Another recent animal study showed that it even may harm the underlying bone, according to Yin Xiao, PhD, a professor at Queensland University of Technology in Australia and lead author of a 2017 study that looked at the effect of diet on OA.

“Our findings suggest that it’s not wear and tear but diet that has a lot to do with the onset of osteoarthritis,” he says.

Blame It On Inflammation

Fat’s not the only culprit, though. Sugar, refined carbs, red meat, processed food and corn and soybean oils can spark inflammation, too. Barry Sears, PhD, a long-time researcher in inflammatory nutrition, says eating them is “like throwing a match into a vat of gasoline.”

These foods also tend to pack on pounds, putting extra pressure on stressed joints. To make matters worse, body fat, especially the kind that collects around your belly, makes its own inflammatory proteins, perpetuating the cycle of inflammation even after you’ve sworn off junk food forever.

Fighting Back

The solution is to change the way you eat. Switching to an anti-inflammatory or Mediterranean-style diet can help you lose weight and significantly improve your joint, heart and  brain health without sacrificing good taste.

An anti-inflammatory diet is heavy on fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and healthy fats like olive oil, avocados and nuts. Poultry’s allowed  now and then and you can have one glass of red wine or beer a day. Off the menu, as you might expect, are sugar, red meat, and processed foods.

What sets this way of eating apart is that it actively fights inflammation, experts say.

“There are a variety of foods in the Mediterranean diet that are high in fiber, beta carotene, magnesium and omega 3s, all of which have been found to reduce inflammatory markers in human studies,” explains Michelle Babb, MS, RD, a Seattle-based nutrition educator.

“I’ve had [arthritis] patients who have been able to discontinue the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a result of transitioning to a Mediterranean diet. Some even report a noticeable difference in pain in the first week.”

Even so, changing the way you eat can be daunting.

“Don’t expect your diet to change overnight,” advises Sotiria Everett, EdD, RD, an assistant professor at Stonybrook University Medical Center in New York. “Start by looking at what you’re eating now (a food diary is a great way to do this) and identifying areas where you can improve.”

But Babb doesn’t see a problem. Her patients “really enjoy this food plan and don’t feel it’s a hardship to follow it,” she says.

She admits it takes more work and advance planning than the drive-through and recommends prepping some food for the week in advance.

I personally can agree with this as when I stopped eating so much red meat and cut out sugar and most processed junk I felt much better .

And when I eat things that are not as healthy as they should be I feel more pain.

So try a plant based diet or as they suggest Mediterranean

You will be so glad you did.

This taken from article Arthritis Foundation Blog

Posted in Awareness, Disease, Education, Inflammation

Food – Inflammation And Pain Part 1 of 4

Part 1 of 4

 

When you are in pain, what you eat can have a huge impact on how you feel and your health period.

If you don’t get the proper vitamins to heal, you can prolong the pain that you are in.

In addition, certain foods can help fight inflammation, while other foods can make you feel worse.

If your in pain after an injury, or you have a condition that causes pain, you can get some relief by just eating a better.

You can also improve your mood, get better sleep, and help the healing process all with the food that you eat each day.

The Unhealthy Food You Eat Will Probably Make Your Pain Feel Worse

Junk food does a lot more to than make us gain weight.

When we eat foods that are high in sugar, this can cause pain to become worse.

Sugar can cause inflammation in the body, which is only going to add to your overall pain.

Plus if you eat food that is high in fat, you we be feeling sluggish rundown and tired all the time.

When you eat food that doesn’t provide any nutritional value, your body won’t be able to heal as easily.

Sure we may all eat a cookie or 2 or pressed for time and hit the local drive through but we cannot do that on a regular basis.

I noticed this when I started to keep a pain journal. If you want to start one here is how.

Before I get back to food inflammation and pain.

The Things to Include in Your Pain Journal 

What exactly do you log in a pain journal? Everybody uses their journal differently, but most practitioners advise including the following:

  • Give your pain a scale rating. Most pain scales  use the 0-10 rating system, with 0 representing no pain and 10 representing the worst imaginable pain. Your pain will usually fall somewhere in between.
  • Use pain descriptor words. Is your pain burning? Tingling? Pulsating? Using pain descriptor words in your journal can help you track changes and patterns in your pain quality. It can also help doctors pinpoint your type of pain.
  • Track the time of day pain occurs. Do you hurt more in the morning or the evening? How are your afternoons?
  • Note what you are doing when your pain begins. Did you just get out of bed, or had you been sitting for a while when your pain started? Were you exercising or overusing certain muscles in your body? Write down how you feel after activities, such as walking the dog or playing with the kids.
  • Look at elements that might contribute to your pain. Think about the external factors that may add to the pain, such as if you suffer from stiff joints; does this happen when it’s raining or cold outside?
  • Write down what you ate and drank that day. Foods and beverages may contribute to or worsen the pain you are experiencing. Jot down everything you ingested the day you feel pain.
  • Describe your mood. It’s also important to note your mental state and how you feel when experiencing pain. Are you depressed? Anxious? Fatigued? Obviously, the pain might be triggering these emotions, and your doctor may recommend you see a mental health specialist to deal with the feelings that arise as a result of your chronic pain.

You can also get apps like

Catch my pain

My pain diary

Are excellent apps.

Armed with your pain journal, your next visit to your health practitioner may be that much more helpful.

Now back to food

You Need Vitamins and Minerals to Help Your Body Heal

Sore and tired muscles, broken bones, joint replacements, bone disorders pulled and torn muscles and tendons all need the right vitamins and minerals in order to heal properly.

In the event of a broken bone, eating calcium-rich foods such as milk and cheese will help speed along your healing.

When your muscles are tight, eating nutrient-dense foods such as fruits and vegetables will give you the vitamins and minerals you need for your muscles to regenerate.

Healing takes time, and it will take you less time when you give your body the right nutrients.

Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are often the culprits that cause pain, decreased joint mobility and even limit our desire to enjoy an active lifestyle. Visions of long hikes, tennis games, playing a little three-on-three basketball, or dancing the night away may encourage you to take that leap – or limp – into hip it knee replacement surgery.

A Healthy Diet Will Improve Your Pain and Your Mood

Your diet can have a big impact on your overall mood and your pain.

When you are getting the right nutrition, you won’t feel tired.

You will be able to get through your day without reaching for sugary, calorie-laden snacks. Eating well helps your mind and body.

Pain management can be a difficult process. When you are in pain, dealing with the pain can produce a negative mood. Eating healthy gives your body the tools it needs to feel better. When you have the right nutrients, your pain levels will decrease. You will have less inflammation in your body when you stay away from foods laden with sugar. Over time, your mood will improve the longer you eat healthier. If you are suffering in pain and aren’t sure what to do, it’s time to look at dietary changes you can make to feel better.

Talk with your doctor about what is best for you.

You should be checked for any deficiencies like vitamin d,b vitamins , folate, iron, magnesium, niacin, if you have a clit disorder talk to your doctor about how much or how little greens you should have or avoid, if on a statin as about supplements like coq10 and krill oil.

We have one body and it wants to heal…..

Stay tuned for part 2

Posted in Awareness, Goals

Goals Over Resolutions

So it’s a New Year : Happy 2019

I stopped making resolutions and I now aim for New Years goals

Why goals?

That’s pretty simple – because goals are more specific, whereas resolutions tend to be vague.

Goals are much more actionable, which is what makes them more effective for me.

How can you turn your New Year’s resolutions into goals?

Get clear on what you want to accomplish, why it’s important, and how you will make it happen.

Take something broad such as making more money in the next year and break it down.

How are you going to make more money? Will that be getting a promotion, changing jobs, or starting a side business?

What steps do you need to take? If you’re looking to change jobs, then you’ll need to start networking, update your resume,

Or if you want to lose weight.

And break it down, what will I do to lose weight.

Change your diet

Exercise 3-4 days a week

Get specific

You can improve your odds of successful resolution completion, however, by implementing a few simple tricks:

• Make goals small but specific . Instead of saying you want to lose 25-50 or however many pounds, aim to exercise three to four days a week for the next 30 days.

• You’ll be achieving the same goal (losing weight) but you’ll be framing it in a way that makes it seem more manageable. This will ensure you don’t become so overwhelmed and intimidated that you quit before you’ve had the chance to start.

• Set short-term objectives. If your New Years Resolution is to eat healthy, instead of telling yourself “I’m not going to eat junk food for the next three months”, tell yourself “I’m not going to eat junk food for the next week”. Breaking up a large goal into smaller chunks will give you the sense of accomplishment you’ll need in order to stay motivated enough to see your goals through to completion.

• Or I’m going to start adding more healthy food choices into my daily meals.

• Get a “goal buddy” You’ll be far more likely to achieve your objectives if you have a friend by your side to encourage you to stay persistent.

• If you don’t have a goal buddy I’ll be your goal buddy.

Even with these tips, however, New Years Resolutions and Goals can still be a challenge, especially for chronic pain sufferers.

Finding a healthy way to effectively deal with pain can be difficult when you’re still struggling to accomplish every day activities like getting out of bed or walking to the mailbox.

Nevertheless, if you start small and stay realistic, you’ll be able to make real strides towards becoming healthier and happier. Here are four resolutions to get you started.

Goals

Walk at least three times a week

Research suggests that light to moderate exercise helps with chronic pain because it lessens inflammation and promotes healing by pumping oxygenized blood to injured areas of the body. It also strengthens muscles, which can become weak and stiff when underused.

By building muscle strength through low-impact workouts, you’re helping to reduce and prevent the painful side effects of inactivity side effects that often exasperate the symptoms of chronic pain.

While any form of regular exercise can help, walking makes for an ideal New Years Goal

because it’s simple and doesn’t require fancy equipment or expensive gym memberships.

All you need is a comfortable pair of walking shoes (and a dog, child or friend to keep you company) and you’re set!

How long and how far you walk will depend on your level of ability and comfort, but if a jaunt around the block sounds intimidating, you can start by incorporating more walking into your every-day routine.

Next time you go grocery shopping, for example, deliberately park a little ways away from the main entrance so that you’ll be forced to journey on foot more than you would normally.

Or use your lunch break at work to take a short walk around the building.

For those experiencing more intense pain, walking on a padded treadmill can help, as can walking in a swimming pool or riding a recumbent bike Once regular exercise has become part of your routine, you can begin working on other aspects of physical fitness.

2. Meditate for 7 minutes every day

Though it may seem too simple, meditation is one of the most powerful tools available when it comes fighting chronic pain.

Sitting quietly for a few minutes every day can help because it refocuses your thoughts away from the pain and onto your breathing.

Over time, this can lead to a reduction in the intensity of the pain.

Meditation also helps to eliminate stress and increase happiness levels, both of which can affect your perception of pain.

If you’re new to mediation, i recommend starting with 7 minutes per day. If you can meditate longer, that’s great, but the most important thing is that you commit to doing it every day.

The process is simple; sit in a quiet place, close your eyes and focus on the feeling of the air entering and leaving your body as you inhale and exhale.

3. Write in your Gratitude Journal every evening

Make 2019 the year you start a “Gratitude Journal”.

The concept of a Gratitude Journal is straightforward: Before you go to sleep each night, write down three things that happened that day that made you happy and then write down the reasons why.

Research has found that doing this every day will lower your stress levels and make you feel calmer.

Feeling calm and relaxed at night will help you sleep better, which can also help to decrease pain levels.

Plus, focusing your thoughts and mental energies on the positive aspects of your life will keep you from dwelling on anything negative.

4. Eat one anti-inflammatory food each day

Foods like broccoli, blueberries, salmon and green leafy vegetables help to reduce one of the major causes of chronic pain: muscle and joint inflammation.

While it would be ideal if every meal included several food items with inflammation-fighting properties, a more realistic goal is to start small.

Focus on eating one healthy, anti-inflammatory fruit or veggie per day and then you can increase from there.

Set yourself up for success and not failure

Wishing you a happy healthy prosperous new year.

Posted in Awareness

The Holiday’s Remembering Self Care.

Holidays I love them and kind of dread them.

My family is in a different state so it gets more lonely.

I miss seeing them open their gifts, I also miss cooking for a crowd. But I have chronic bone pain from Osteonecrosis,Osteoarthritis, Spondylolisthesis and Hashimoto.

And I know that holidays can be so overwhelming for so many.

Here is my checklist to plan your self-care routine so that you can enjoy the upcoming holidays and hopefully not be frazzled and in pain.

1. Make time for yourself.

It is easy to feel overwhelmed during the holiday.

Even if you are out of town visiting family or friends make it a point to have some alone time to just relax and breathe.

If you can afford one maybe consider a massage, or if you’re able to see about attending a local yoga studio . You can also contact the local library because they often offer many things for free.

2. Breathe .

The holiday season ,can trigger all kinds of anxiety, people pulling and tugging at the same item you want, traffic jams,crowds in the malls ,people who forget to drive in the winter weather.

And just spending a few minutes breathing will give you a good dose of stress relief.

Put you arms up and out near your side , palms up count to four as you inhale, and raise your arms so that your palms are at eye level as you count to four.

Now turn your palms down and exhale for a count of 4 and lower your arms back to the beginning space. Hear yourself exhale.

Do this a few times and you will feel yourself relax.

Another one is breathe in for a count of 4 hold it for a count of 4 and exhale for a count of 4.

😇

3. Be mindful about drug and alcohol use.

Sometimes the holidays are filled with parties, which sometimes also means alcohol or drugs will be around. You may feel tempted to use drugs and alcohol cz your friends do or you think it will take the edge off.

It doesn’t.

If your going to drink set a limit say at 2 drinks.

Never your drink alone. There are some crazy ass people out there who will try to slip you something. Trust no one with your drink.

Also never drink and drive , don’t drink buzzed either. and always wear your seatbelt.

It’s best to just pay for a taxi or Uber.

⛄️

4.Some family members can be a stressor, you know that uncle who drinks way to much knocks over the tree or that other relative who just won’t shut up about politics

Take care of yourself during difficult interactions with family.

The holidays mean we’re often in places with people who you may not see the rest of the year.

5.Make room for grieving loved ones who have passed. It’s normal to miss them. Talking about some good memories often helps.

🎄

Be kind to yourself don’t worry if you cannot do it all, it’s ok.

You have a lot going on balancing maybe doctors, work, school pain, family , holiday prep all the above .

Don’t be to hard on your self and be kind to others because we are all dealing with something and holidays aren’t always easy especially while having a chronic condition

And others …. well they could be hurting also in some way.

May you have many blessings ! Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

❤️

Posted in Awareness, Herbal, Herbology, Homemade Syrups,Tinctures,Rubs

Elderberry Syrup

If you have ever had a miserable case of the common cold or the flu, you know how miserable it can be.

Thankfully nature provides some remedies that can help avoid minor illnesses and or shorten the duration if you do get sick.

Black Elderberries aka (sambucus nigra) has been shown to help avoid these types of illnesses and speed recovery in those who already have them.

Elderberry Syrup to help me Avoid the Flu

prep 10 mins

cook 1 hour

yields about 4 cups

I took several herbology classes and learned so much , like how to make a simple elderberry syrup , tinctures, poultices etc… this recipe is made with dried or fresh elderberries,honey and herbs and spices for an immune boosting and delicious syrup.

I haven’t had the flu in 3 years.

Some people even use on homemade pancakes or waffles.

Elderberry Syrup

Ingredients

1 cup dried black elderberries, or 1 1/3 cups fresh or frozen

4 cups water

2 TBSP fresh or dried ginger root

1/2 teaspoon turmeric root or powder

1 tsp cinnamon powder

1/2 cup raw honey

Instructions

1. Pour water into medium saucepan and add elderberries, ginger, cinnamon

3. Bring to a boil and then cover and reduce to a simmer for about 45 minutes to an hour.

5. Allow the liquid to reduce by almost half.

6. Remove from heat and let cool until it is cool enough to be handled.

7. Mash the berries carefully using a spoon or other flat utensil.

9. Pour through a strainer into a glass mason jar

11. Discard the rest of the elderberries and let the liquid cool to lukewarm.

12. When it is no longer hot, add the honey and stir well.

14. When the honey is well mixed into the elderberry mixture, pour the syrup into a quart sized mason jar with airtight lid

15. And there you have it. Elderberry syrup

Store in the fridge and take daily for its immune boosting properties. Some sources recommend taking only during the week and not on the weekends to boost immunity.

I personally take 1 tablespoon a day. If the flu bug does get me , I take the normal dose every 4 to 5 hours instead of once a day, until my symptoms disappear.

A friend of mine told me she tried it on her pancakes and loved it 😍multipurpose .

Of course I personally use this and I would never tell you to take this or anything else. I just post things that I believe work for me.

And it’s a great Syrup with extra benefits.

*Never try anything without talking you your own primary care physician.

#Elderberry #FluFighter #Syrup #FoodIsThyMedicine #Flu # Pancakes #PancakeSyrup

This blog is for entertainment purposes only. Never intended as medical advice.

Disclaimer

https://chronicallygratefuldebla.com/

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Chronic Pain, Clinical Trials, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Hashimoto, Hypothyroidism, Life, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, SPONK, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Support Group, Hope, The Mighty, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards, wellness

WEGOHealth Awards and How to Nominate Others

I’m honored to say I’ve been nominated for the #WEGOHealthAwards! These awards seek to recognize Patient Leaders who are making an impact with their advocacy. Learn more – nominate today.

Here’s how you can also nominate others who educate, advocate and make a difference!

Click link below

WEGOHealth Awards and Nomination Info

WEGOHealth Awards Link To Information

Think about the advocates and influencers you see leading Facebook groups, blogging about their health journey, speaking up and giving insights to healthcare companies, presenting on national stages, and running Twitter chats.

Patient Leaders have started non-profits, published podcast episodes, and authored books – there is no shortage of Patient Leaders’ contributions to the world, so let’s recognize as many of them as we can for their talents, contributions, and commitment.

Feel free to add their names and web info also in my comment section! And they can get some recognition here to !

Have a Great Day Everyone

Posted in Adrenals, Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Awareness, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Delicious, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Hashimoto, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, SONK, SPONK, Uncategorized, Vegetables, WegoHealth, wellness

Healthy Eating

Developing healthy eating habits isn’t as confusing or as restrictive as many people imagine. The essential steps are to eat mostly foods derived from plants—vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes (beans, peas, lentils)—and limit highly processed foods.

 

For most of my life, I ate the standard American diet and meals that were heavy in meat and processed foods. I went to a vegetarian lifestyle in high school for a couple years then back to the old way.

When i was diagnosed with Osteonecrosis, Osteoarthritis HBP etc and especially when my husband had a heart attack in 2016 I thought enough was enough.

I got rid of a lot of processed foods, potato chips, convenience meals, and loved Oreo’s and Nutter Butter cookies. There was a lot of sugar, oil, and junk in my diet.

We quit smoking 2 years ago almost. and we as a team decided to go part time but mostly vegan .

Me having a few issues from Osteonecrosis, Osteoarthritis, Hashimot’s and Hypothyroidism and Adrenal Fatigue left me in pain and always exhausted.

I had been dealing with pain in my knee and back for a few years. My mind wants to go go go like it did 25 years ago, my knees say oh hell no slow down woman. And this extra weight is just hard on the bones. But when your limited by many bone issues its really hard to just walk 3-4 miles a day. I bike 3-4 miles a day but its not the same as a good hike in the woods. I do go now and then walking in the woods but hiking I’m afraid for now all that has been on hold.

Going to mostly plant based has helped my pain. And my energy.

So its working and I am feeling better slowly …..

Its a process…

Don’t just go all I went to 65 percent of eating all veggies daily  then added more from there. Some days i eat no meat or fish and some days i will. I Slowly cut out animal products, starting with the easiest and leaving barrier foods to the end. Slowly lessened  my consumption of animal products while simultaneously increasing the number of plant-based foods in our diet.

I spoke to my doctors and I will post tomorrow just how i got started

 

 

plantsz

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Ease your Stress, Eat Healthy, Endocrinologist, Factor V Leiden, Food Is Thy Medicine, Gluten Free, Hashimoto

Hashimoto

I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism in 1996 I was 34 and I really have never felt myself since then.

I always try to live a decent life kind to others , help in my community and I’d rather be happy than mad or sad.

But ….. I still always felt fatigued, more tired than I should be.

Actually if I’m honest with myself it seems as if the symptoms just get worse more intense.

 

I have asked countless doctors over the last 20+ years to check me for Hashimoto Disease because the countless adjustments to synthroid , levothyroxine and now armour just isn’t helping , it helps for a couple months then adjustments happen and I just feel worse .

 

Finally tested and diagnosed

April 2018 w/ Hashimoto

 

Sure everyday I wake up happy

But I soon feel

exhausted

fatigued

sluggish

winded

My skin is dry, my eyes are dry, my mouth is dry, my hair is dry and thinning.

 

I have this constant feeling on my throat as if a thumb is pressing on it.

 

We won’t talk about the weight gain over the last 20 years. I mean really between this and osteoarthritis -osteonecrosis I just get overwhelming-some days

But what sucks is the inability to lose the weight

So time to change the way I eat again ….

I have already gone to mostly plant based now I have to try and go gluten free.

As Hashimoto is linked to gut as is most auto immune conditions.

Hashimoto vs Hypothyroidism

This common question can be confusing to even veteran thyroid patients.

 

Let’s clear up the main difference: Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is a disease; hypothyroidism is a condition.

 

In the United States, hypothyroidism is most commonly caused by Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, but the two terms are not interchangeable.

 

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is an autoimmune disease that affects your thyroid gland. It is sometimes known as Hashimoto’s disease, autoimmune thyroiditis, or chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis. In Hashimoto’s, antibodies react against proteins in your thyroid gland, causing gradual destruction of the gland itself, and making it unable to produce the thyroid hormones your body needs.

Diagnosis

I had to insist on this test because I was blown off for years by several doctors when I asked for this test.

 

 

High levels of antibodies against thyroglobulin (TG) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO), detected via blood test

 

Hashimoto’s typically involves a slow but steady destruction of your gland that eventually results in the thyroid’s inability to produce sufficient thyroid hormone—the condition known as hypothyroidism. Along the way, however, there can be periods where your thyroid sputters back to life, even causing temporary hyperthyroidism, then a return to hypothyroidism. This cycling back and forth between hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism is characteristic of Hashimoto’s disease.

 

 

So, for example, periods of anxiety/insomnia/may be followed by periods of depression/fatigue/weight gain.

In some cases, the onset of Hashimoto’s and elevation of antibodies will be accompanied by a variety of symptoms, including anxiety, difficulty sleeping, fatigue, weight changes, depression, hair loss, muscle/joint aches and pains, and fertility problems, among others.

 

 

Ultimately, however, the autoimmune attack on the thyroid typically makes the gland slowly less able to function, and eventually, the thyroid becomes underactive.

 

So I wonder in 1996 did i have Hashimoto? When i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism ? Or did it morph into this…..

 

More to come as I learn to get this under control……

 

thyroid