Posted in Awareness, Goals

Goals Over Resolutions

So it’s a New Year : Happy 2019

I stopped making resolutions and I now aim for New Years goals

Why goals?

That’s pretty simple – because goals are more specific, whereas resolutions tend to be vague.

Goals are much more actionable, which is what makes them more effective for me.

How can you turn your New Year’s resolutions into goals?

Get clear on what you want to accomplish, why it’s important, and how you will make it happen.

Take something broad such as making more money in the next year and break it down.

How are you going to make more money? Will that be getting a promotion, changing jobs, or starting a side business?

What steps do you need to take? If you’re looking to change jobs, then you’ll need to start networking, update your resume,

Or if you want to lose weight.

And break it down, what will I do to lose weight.

Change your diet

Exercise 3-4 days a week

Get specific

You can improve your odds of successful resolution completion, however, by implementing a few simple tricks:

• Make goals small but specific . Instead of saying you want to lose 25-50 or however many pounds, aim to exercise three to four days a week for the next 30 days.

• You’ll be achieving the same goal (losing weight) but you’ll be framing it in a way that makes it seem more manageable. This will ensure you don’t become so overwhelmed and intimidated that you quit before you’ve had the chance to start.

• Set short-term objectives. If your New Years Resolution is to eat healthy, instead of telling yourself “I’m not going to eat junk food for the next three months”, tell yourself “I’m not going to eat junk food for the next week”. Breaking up a large goal into smaller chunks will give you the sense of accomplishment you’ll need in order to stay motivated enough to see your goals through to completion.

• Or I’m going to start adding more healthy food choices into my daily meals.

• Get a “goal buddy” You’ll be far more likely to achieve your objectives if you have a friend by your side to encourage you to stay persistent.

• If you don’t have a goal buddy I’ll be your goal buddy.

Even with these tips, however, New Years Resolutions and Goals can still be a challenge, especially for chronic pain sufferers.

Finding a healthy way to effectively deal with pain can be difficult when you’re still struggling to accomplish every day activities like getting out of bed or walking to the mailbox.

Nevertheless, if you start small and stay realistic, you’ll be able to make real strides towards becoming healthier and happier. Here are four resolutions to get you started.

Goals

Walk at least three times a week

Research suggests that light to moderate exercise helps with chronic pain because it lessens inflammation and promotes healing by pumping oxygenized blood to injured areas of the body. It also strengthens muscles, which can become weak and stiff when underused.

By building muscle strength through low-impact workouts, you’re helping to reduce and prevent the painful side effects of inactivity side effects that often exasperate the symptoms of chronic pain.

While any form of regular exercise can help, walking makes for an ideal New Years Goal

because it’s simple and doesn’t require fancy equipment or expensive gym memberships.

All you need is a comfortable pair of walking shoes (and a dog, child or friend to keep you company) and you’re set!

How long and how far you walk will depend on your level of ability and comfort, but if a jaunt around the block sounds intimidating, you can start by incorporating more walking into your every-day routine.

Next time you go grocery shopping, for example, deliberately park a little ways away from the main entrance so that you’ll be forced to journey on foot more than you would normally.

Or use your lunch break at work to take a short walk around the building.

For those experiencing more intense pain, walking on a padded treadmill can help, as can walking in a swimming pool or riding a recumbent bike Once regular exercise has become part of your routine, you can begin working on other aspects of physical fitness.

2. Meditate for 7 minutes every day

Though it may seem too simple, meditation is one of the most powerful tools available when it comes fighting chronic pain.

Sitting quietly for a few minutes every day can help because it refocuses your thoughts away from the pain and onto your breathing.

Over time, this can lead to a reduction in the intensity of the pain.

Meditation also helps to eliminate stress and increase happiness levels, both of which can affect your perception of pain.

If you’re new to mediation, i recommend starting with 7 minutes per day. If you can meditate longer, that’s great, but the most important thing is that you commit to doing it every day.

The process is simple; sit in a quiet place, close your eyes and focus on the feeling of the air entering and leaving your body as you inhale and exhale.

3. Write in your Gratitude Journal every evening

Make 2019 the year you start a “Gratitude Journal”.

The concept of a Gratitude Journal is straightforward: Before you go to sleep each night, write down three things that happened that day that made you happy and then write down the reasons why.

Research has found that doing this every day will lower your stress levels and make you feel calmer.

Feeling calm and relaxed at night will help you sleep better, which can also help to decrease pain levels.

Plus, focusing your thoughts and mental energies on the positive aspects of your life will keep you from dwelling on anything negative.

4. Eat one anti-inflammatory food each day

Foods like broccoli, blueberries, salmon and green leafy vegetables help to reduce one of the major causes of chronic pain: muscle and joint inflammation.

While it would be ideal if every meal included several food items with inflammation-fighting properties, a more realistic goal is to start small.

Focus on eating one healthy, anti-inflammatory fruit or veggie per day and then you can increase from there.

Set yourself up for success and not failure

Wishing you a happy healthy prosperous new year.

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Ancestry, Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Chronic Pain, Clinical Trials, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Food, Happiness, History, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, OA, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Osteoporosis, Pain, SONK, SPONK, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Uncategorized, WegoHealth

Bone & Joint Action Week October 12-20

Bone and Joint Action Week is held annually October 12-20 with activities focused on disorders including arthritis, back pain, Osteonecrosis,Osteoarthritis trauma, pediatric conditions, and osteoporosis. The themes and their related activities are designed to raise awareness worldwide about prevention, disease management and treatment.

Statistics on Avascular Necrosis (AVN, Osteonecrosis, Aseptic Necrosis, Ischaemic Necrosis, Femoral Head Necrosis)

Frequency depends on the site involved. The most common site is the hip; other locations include the carpals, talus, and humerus. In most countries, exact figures on incidence and prevalence are unknown.

One Japanese survey estimated that 2500-3300 cases of AVN of the hip occur each year; of which, 34.7% were a result of corticosteroid abuse, 21.8% to alcohol abuse, and 37.1% to idiopathic mechanisms. A French study reported AVN in 4.3% of allogenic bone marrow transplant recipients.

Race: No racial predilection exists except for AVN associated with sickle cell disease and hemoglobin S and SC disease, which predominantly are diagnosed in people of African and Mediteranean descent.

Sex: The male-to-female ratio depends on the underlying cause, although primary AVN is more prevalent in men. The overall male-to-female ratio is 8:1.

Age: Age at onset depends on the underlying cause. Primary AVN most often occurs during the fourth or fifth decade and is bilateral in 40-80% of cases. On average, women present almost 10 years later than men.

Risk Factors for Avascular Necrosis (AVN, Osteonecrosis, Aseptic Necrosis, Ischaemic Necrosis, Femoral Head Necrosis)

Avascular necrosis has several causes. Loss of blood supply to the bone can be caused by an injury (trauma-related avascular necrosis or joint dislocation) or by certain risk factors (nontraumatic avascular necrosis), such as some medications (usually steroid basesd), steroid abuse in general, blood coagulation disorders like sickle cell, Factor V, FactorViii, MTHFR, eNOS and more, chemo and radiation infections in the Bone vascular issues such as vascularitis or alcohol abuse. Increased pressure within the bone also is associated with avascular necrosis. The pressure within the bone causes the blood vessels to narrow, making it hard for the vessels to deliver enough blood to the bone cells.Many deep sea divers get Avascular Necrosis from a condition known as the bends. Gaucher disease.

Progression of Avascular Necrosis (AVN, Osteonecrosis, Aseptic Necrosis, Ischaemic Necrosis, Femoral Head Necrosis)

Hip Stages of avn-on

1-4

The natural history of osteonecrosis is directly linked to the size and level of the necrosis. Very small lesions (involvement of less than 15% of the femoral head) may resolve without any further treatment. Conversly, lesions involving greater than 50% of the femoral head progress to collapse, and ultimately require in total hip arthroplasty.

Symptoms of Avascular Necrosis (AVN, Osteonecrosis, Aseptic Necrosis, Ischaemic Necrosis, Femoral Head Necrosis)

In the early stages of avascular necrosis, patients may be asymptomatic. However, as the disease progresses most patients will begin to experience joint pain; at first, only when putting weight on the affected joint, and eventually even when resting. Pain usually develops gradually and may be mild or severe.

If the level of necrosis progresses further and the bone and surrounding joint surface collapse, pain may develop or dramatically increase.

The pain may be severe enough to limit the patient’s range of motion in the affected joint.

In some cases, particularly those involving the hip, disabling osteoarthritis may develop.

The period of time between the first symptoms and loss of joint function is different for each patient, ranging from several months to more than a year.

How is Avascular Necrosis (AVN, Osteonecrosis, Aseptic Necrosis, Ischaemic Necrosis, Femoral Head Necrosis) Diagnosed?

In the earliest stages of Avascular necrosis plain x-rays are often normal. A magnetic resonance image (MRI) is the key that allows us to detect AVN at its earliest stage.

Osteonecrosis develops when the blood supply to a segment of bone is disrupted. Without adequate nourishment, the affected portion of bone dies and gradually collapses. As a result, the articular cartilage covering the bone also collapses, leading to disabling arthritis.

Osteonecrosis of the knee can affect anyone, but is more common in people over the age of 60. Woman are three times more likely than men to develop the condition.

Risk Factors

It is not always known what causes the lack of blood supply, but doctors have identified a number of risk factors that make someone more likely to develop osteonecrosis.

Injury. A knee injury—such as a stress fracture or dislocation, meniscus tear, bruised patella or combined with some type of trauma to the knee, can damage blood vessels and reduce blood flow to the affected bone.

Oral corticosteroid medications.

Many diseases, such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis, are treated with oral steroid medications.

Although it is not known exactly why these medications can lead to osteonecrosis, research shows that there is a connection between the disease and long-term steroid use. Steroid-induced osteonecrosis frequently affects multiple joints in the body.

Medical conditions.

Osteonecrosis of the knee is associated with medical conditions, such as obesity, sickle cell anemia, and lupus.

Transplants. Organ transplantation, especially kidney transplant, is associated with osteonecrosis.

Excessive alcohol use.

Overconsumption of alcohol over time can cause fatty deposits to form in the blood vessels as well as elevated cortisone levels, resulting in a decreased blood supply to the bone.

Chemo therapy and radiation Non-traumatic osteonecrosis of bone is recognized as a potential complication in solid-tumour cancer patients receiving treatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy.

Regardless of the cause, if osteonecrosis is not identified and treated early, it can develop into severe osteoarthritis. And for some with osteoarthritis before avn the disease is even more painful.

Knee stages of avn-on

1-4

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Have a blessed and Pain-free Day.

Posted in Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Flush not Blush, Happiness, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, StopTheClot, Uncategorized, WegoHealth

Walk To Be Spontaneously Happy

Walking is an ideal daily exercise for a wide variety of reasons – including its beneficial impact on body, mind and spirit!

Walking as a way to get daily exercise, it can help strengthen major organs in the body, promote bone density , boost the immune system, lead to a more positive outlook and more.

If your new to exercise always clear it with your doctor. Don’t over do it. Gradually build up to it.

I gave bone problems Osteonecrosis,Osteoarthritis and Spondylolisthesis. I was told to limit my weight bearing but just standing is weight bearing, and then one doctor told me exercise all I want it will help your knee collapse faster !! WTH needless to say he was fired.

But I do need to move.

I started out with 10 minutes after a couple weeks 15 minutes snd so on.

Some days I can walk 40 minutes other days 15 depends on pain level.

When I’m in a lot of pain which usually comes with winter and cold months.

I ride my recumbent bike at least 15-30 minutes a day.

But walking clears the head, gets us in touch with nature it gets me from a funk to happiness

Spontaneously Happy

I used to love winter now because of my bones I really dread it.

If you can’t walk , if in a wheelchair or scooter getting out in nature is still good for the soul.

Photos and Video I took in Millcreek Park in various locations of park .

I really miss hiking : but for now walking will do.

Posted in Avascular Necrosis, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Inflammation, Life, OA, Uncategorized, WegoHealth

Today Is National Walking Day

National Walking Day 2017 April 5, 2017


I do love a good walk or hike.  

Studies have suggested that moderate physical activity has many proven benefits for overall health, such as lowering blood pressure, increasing HDL, or “good”, cholesterol and controlling weight. All these changes help to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, the nation’s No. 1 and No. 5 killers.

Gentle, low-impact exercise that’s easy, free and available to everyone here’s why walking rocks.
1. Walking strengthens your heart

Reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke by walking regularly. It’s great cardio exercise, lowering levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol while increasing levels of HDL (good) cholesterol. The Stroke Association says that a brisk 30-minute walk every day helps to prevent and control the high blood pressure that causes strokes, reducing the risk by up to 27 percent.

2. Walking lowers disease risk

A regular walking habit slashes the risk of type 2 diabetes by around 60 percent, and you’re 20 percent less likely to develop cancer of the colon, breast or womb with an active hobby such as walking.

3. Walking helps you lose weight

You’ll burn around 75 calories simply by walking at 2mph for 30 minutes. Up your speed to 3mph and it’s 99 calories, while 4mph is 150 calories (equivalent to three Jaffa cakes and a jam doughnut!). Work that short walk into your daily routine and you’ll shed the pounds in no time.

4. Walking prevents dementia

Older people who walk six miles or more per week are more likely to avoid brain shrinkage and preserve memory as the years pass. Since dementia affects one in 14 people over 65 and one in six over 80, we reckon that’s a pretty great idea.

5. Walking tones up legs, bums and tums

Give definition to calves, quads and hamstrings while lifting your glutes (bum muscles) with a good, regular walk. Add hill walking into the mix and it’s even more effective. Pay attention to your posture and you’ll also tone your abs and waist.

6. Walking boosts vitamin D

We all need to get outside more. Many people in the UK are vitamin D deficient, affecting important things like bone health and our immune systems. Walking is the perfect way to enjoy the outdoors while getting your vitamin D fix.

7. Walking gives you energy

You’ll get more done with more energy, and a brisk walk is one of the best natural energisers around. It boosts circulation and increases oxygen supply to every cell in your body, helping you to feel more alert and alive. Try walking on your lunch break to achieve more in the afternoon.

8. Walking makes you happy

It’s true  exercise boosts your mood. Studies show that a brisk walk is just as effective as antidepressants in mild to moderate cases of depression, releasing feel-good endorphins while reducing stress and anxiety. So for positive mental health, walking’s an absolute must.