Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Food, Food Is Thy Medicine, Foodie, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, SPONK, StopTheClot, Thyroid

Pain Chronic Pain

Once we accept the reality of the current moment (no matter how unpleasant it may be) for what it is, and not what we wish it were, we can turn our attention to ways to improve it. This I find true in any situation.

Living with chronic pain can throw your life upside down.

It’s hard to believe that I can and have managed my rare disease Osteonecrosis (knee) pain. And my Osteoarthritis pain.

But the pain of spondylolisthesis somedays is truly unbearable. It can just take a fabulous day day and screw it all up.

Today is one of those days.

I try to stay busy , and positive when I really would like to go somewhere and just scream at the top of my lungs.

I don’t think my neighbors would appreciate it. So I bang away at the keyboard.

Since the weather in NE Ohio has changed I am having more and more days in pain.

And in the days when all the above hurt I’m down right miserable. Thank Hod that hasn’t happened yet , but then fall and winter have only begun….

I’m grateful today it’s just my back although it feels as if I have been kicked in my L5S1 several times.

Besides having spondylolisthesis I also for the past decade or longer been dealing with osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis since 2014.

If you don’t know what they are I will explain below.

Osteoarthritis

Sometimes called degenerative joint disease or degenerative arthritis, osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common chronic condition of the joints, affecting approximately 27 million Americans. OA can affect any joint, but it occurs most often in knees, hips, lower back and neck, small joints of the fingers and the bases of the thumb and big toe.

In normal joints, a firm, rubbery material called cartilage covers the end of each bone. Cartilage provides a smooth, gliding surface for joint motion and acts as a cushion between the bones. In OA, the cartilage breaks down, causing pain, swelling and problems moving the joint. As OA worsens over time, bones may break down and develop growths called spurs. Bits of bone or cartilage may chip off and float around in the joint. In the body, an inflammatory process occurs and cytokines (proteins) and enzymes develop that further damage the cartilage. In the final stages of OA, the cartilage wears away and bone rubs against bone leading to joint damage and more pain.

Who’s Affected?

Although OA occurs in people of all ages, osteoarthritis is most common in people older than 65. Common risk factors include increasing age, obesity, previous joint injury, overuse of the joint, weak thigh muscles, and genes.

One in two adults will develop symptoms of knee OA during their lives.

One in four adults will development symptoms of hip OA by age 85. Lucky me I developed Osteoarthritis at age 45.

One in 12 people 60 years or older have hand OA.

Osteonecrosis What it is….

Osteonecrosis of the Knee. Osteonecrosis of the knee (also known as avascular necrosis) and if in the knee from a meniscus tear also called Ahlbacks Disease is a painful condition that occurs when the blood supply to a section of bone in the femur (thighbone) or tibia (shinbone) is disrupted.

I have Osteonecrosis of the medial femoral condyle due to a meniscus tear in 2014. Strange no one wanted to fix it or have any treatment plan.

This pain is like no other. Your area of Osteonecrosis is ice cold yet it often can feel like it was hit by a lightening bolt.

Weather plays a huge factor for me and my pain. I used to love winter now I can barely tolerate a cool fall day. I dread winter.

I get sick of being in pain. If it’s not the knees it’s back or hands it’s just enough to jack up my day or make things more difficult than they already are.

I have found that plant based lifestyle has helped my osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis a lot. I can’t understand why I haven’t lost a ton of weight though. I mean I don’t eat half the unhealthy calories I used to . But hey the doctors says it’s a slow thyroid.

I just wish these 40 lbs would come off it would also help my bones.

But maybe that will just take time.

If you haven’t tried a plant based lifestyle I would highly recommend it.

My cholesterol numbers are fantastic and all my doctors are impressed especially since I rarely need pain medication vs taking 2 a day like I did 3 years ago.

I truly believe that food can be your medicine or your poison.

The choice is yours.

I will be posting a lot of info and recipes

I don’t always eat perfect but life is about compromise and I follow a 90 / 10 rule.

It’s ok to have a cookie or small cupcake just make sure you eat as best as you can most of the time .

Living food is the way to go.

It may not take away all your pain but wouldn’t it be a benefit if it took away a lot of it ? And made it more managed?

Absolutely!!!

Posted in Bone Health, Eat Healthy, Flush not Blush, Gluten Free, Herbal, Inflammation, Recipes, Uncategorized, Vegetables

Vegan Garlic Pasta And Roasted Veggies Two Ways.

This is a 20 minute virtually fool-proof dinner.
While you get your sauce going by sauteeing garlic and shallot in a little olive oil, roast your tomatoes.
When you roast tomatoes in a little olive oil and sea salt, it enhances their natural flavor and gives them an almost sweet yet smoky, fire-roasted taste, which pairs perfectly with the creamy garlic sauce.

I make this about once a month.

This was my second time using gluten free pasta
I bought quinoa pasta ( thin spaghetti style) and this time (penne style) quinoa
It wasn't bad but I'm so used to whole wheat pasta it's going to take a minute.

Ingredients
• 4 cups (450 g) grape tomatoes, halved I use red and yellow when available
• 10 ounces (283 g) whole wheat pasta (such as penne, linguini, or fettuccine | Use less if you want a higher sauce:pasta ratio | Use gluten-free pasta for GF eaters)
• Olive oil
• 2 medium shallots, diced (~1/4 cup or 40 g)
• 6 large cloves garlic, minced/grated (1/4 cup or 24 g)
• Pinch each sea salt and black pepper
• 3-4 Tbsp (25-33 g) unbleached all-purpose flour (or another thickener of choice)*
• 2 1/2 cups (600 ml) unsweetened plain Almond Breeze (sub up to 1 cup with veggie stock, if preferred)

Instructions
1 Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (204 C) and toss tomatoes in a bit of olive oil and sea salt. Place cut side up on a parchment-lined baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes while you prepare the rest of the dish. Then set aside.
2 Bring a large pot of water to a boil and cook pasta according to package instructions. When done, drain, cover and set aside.
3 In the meantime, prepare the sauce. In a large skillet over medium-low heat, add 1 Tbsp (15 ml) olive oil and the garlic and shallot. Add a pinch of salt and black pepper and stir frequently, cooking for 3-4 minutes until softened and fragrant.
4 Stir in 3-4 Tbsp flour (or other thickener of choice – see notes) and mix with a whisk. Once combined, slowly whisk in the almond milk a little at a time so clumps don’t form. Add another healthy pinch of salt and black pepper, bring to a simmer and continue cooking for another 4-5 minutes to thicken. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed. (Optional: You can also add a few shakes of vegan parmesan for extra flavor at this time if you wish.)
5 If you want an ultra creamy sauce, transfer sauce to a blender (or use an immersion blender) to blend the sauce until creamy and smooth. Place back in pan and reduce heat to a low simmer until desired thickness is reached.
6 Once the sauce is to your desired thickness, taste and adjust seasonings as needed. Then add pasta and roasted tomatoes and stir.
7 Serve immediately and garnish with extra black pepper, fresh basil, and/or vegan parmesan cheese.

Notes
*To keep this recipe gluten-free, sub the flour for cornstarch or another thickener. Add 1-2 Tbsp during the blending process to make sure it’s completely blended. Then add back to the pan to thicken for 5-7 minutes. Alternatively, make a slurry with the cornstarch and a few Tbsp of the sauce in a small bowl and then whisk it directly into the pan during the simmering process. Repeat in 1/2 Tbsp amounts until desired consistency is reached.

I have also made it with regular pasta and tons of roasted eggplant, zucchini , garlic but I'm going to stick with the quinoa pasta.

To roast veggies
I peel and slice 2 small eggplants
3 medium zucchinis
2 semi hot peppers deseeded
Coat with olive oil
Salt and pepper
Place on parchment lined baking dish

Roast 400 degrees for 18-20 min.
Allow to slightly cool then chop and add to your favorite pasta
Top with basil and light cheese if you choose.

Posted in AtomicBlonde, Bone Health, Inflammation, Life, Rosacea

Rosacea 1.0 To Newly Diagnosed Like Me

Ah yes age 54 soon to be 55 and suddenly develop skin problems.

You would think by age 50 after working all your life and dealing with Osteonecrosis Osteoarthritis Spondylolisthesis Being a former Battered woman from my 1st marriage

I could at least remain free and clear from skin problems I mean at age 50 we deserve at least 10 years of nothing else as a diagnosis

So here I am learning more stuff.
Exhausting……

1.0 Rosacea (said rose-ay-shah) is a potentially progressive neurovascular disorder that generally affects the facial skin and eyes. The most common symptoms include facial redness and inflammation across the flushing zone – usually the nose, cheeks, chin and forehead ; visibly dilated blood vessels, facial swelling and burning sensations, and inflammatory papules and pustules.
Rosacea can develop gradually as mild episodes of facial blushing or flushing which, over time, may lead to a permanently red face.
Ocular rosacea can affect both the eye surface and eyelid. Symptoms can include redness, dry eyes, foreign body sensations, sensitivity of the eye surface, burning sensations and eyelid symptoms such as chalazia, styes, redness, crusting and loss of eyelashes.
A panel of experts have agreed on a standard classification system for Rosacea. This system is a brief text that is not intended to be exhaustive, but is a place to start.
“Rosacea is a chronic cutaneous disorder, primarily of the central face. It is often characterized by remission and exacerbation and it encompasses various combinations of such cutaneous signs as flush, erythema, telangiectasias, edema, papules, pustules, ocular lesions, and rhinophyma. Primary features considered as necessary for diagnosis include flushing, erythema, papules, pustules, and telangiectasias. A variety of secondary features are listed that may be absent or present as a single finding or in any combination.”

Are there different types of Rosacea ?
The panel of Rosacea experts agreed on the following broad, non exclusive text (i.e. there may be other factors and types that come into play).
“The system divides rosacea into four subtypes: erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular, phymatous, and ocular. As presently worded, papulopustular rosacea is noted as often being observed following or with erythematotelangiectatic disease and phymatous rosacea as following or occurring together with either erythematotelangiectatic or papulopustular rosacea. However, Dr. Wilkin emphasized that while those descriptions are consistent with common concepts about rosacea natural history, they are provisional and subject to change.”
“In its current iteration, the classification system excludes rosacea fulminans, steroid-induced acneiform eruptions, and perioral dermatitis without rosacea signs from the diagnosis of rosacea.”

What is the difference between acne and rosacea ?
As rosacea is a neurovascular disorder it affects the flushing zone.
Is is common that Rosacea does not present with blackheads that are seen with Acne Vulgaris. Also the age of onset, and the location of redness is a clue. Rosacea is commonly an adult disease, and is generally restricted to the nose, cheeks, chin and forehead. It can coexist with acne vulgaris.
Some rosacea sufferers have a significant acne component in their symptoms so it can be easily confused with acne vulgaris. The papules and pustules of rosacea tend to be less follicular in origin.
Rosacea will probably have an underlying redness that is related to flushing and thus looks different to acne vulgaris. Acne sufferers normally do not have the accompanying redness.
Rosacea usually begins with flushing, leading to persistent redness.
As both conditions are inflammatory, the treatment for rosacea and acne vulgaris can be somewhat similar, but some of the acne vulgaris regimes are too harsh for rosacea affected skin and can severely aggravate the condition.
Rosacea sufferers are cautioned against using common acne treatments such as alpha hydroxy acids (glycolic and lactic acids), topical retinoids (such as tretinoin, Retin-A Micro, Avita, Differin), benzoyl peroxide, topical azelaic acid, triclosan, acne peels, chemical peels. Additionally the caution extends to topical exfoliants, toners, astringents and alcohol containing products.

What is the difference between Rosacea and Seborrheic Dermatitis ?
Seborrheic Dermatitis and Rosacea are closely related, they both involve inflammation of the oil glands. Rosacea also involves a vascular component causing flushing and broken blood vessels.
Seborrheic Dermatitis may involve the presence of somewhat greasy flaking involving the T zone, crusts, scales, itching and occasionally burning, and may also be found on the scalp, ears and torso. It does not usually involve red bumps as in Rosacea.
The T zone is the area shaped like a `T’ composed of your forehead, nose and around your mouth.
Just to confuse things further, the two conditions are often seen together. See also: seb derm, elidel and protopic : a warning.

1.4 What causes Rosacea ?
There are a few theories, but none are yet conclusive. Popular theories include rosacea being caused by how frequently we flush and how our blood vessels cope with this flushing ; an over active inflammatory response to some unknown pathogen.
The fact that rosacea’s cause is unknown thankfully hasn’t stopped the development of some excellent treatment regimes.

How does rosacea progress ?
“Rosacea normally progresses in the same generalised fashion, frequent dilation of facial blood vessels leads to vascular hyper-responsiveness
and structural damage.”
Rosacea experts talk about rosacea symptoms appearing in 4 stages. Over time rosacea can progress from one stage to the next.
From Dr. J Wilkin:
“Most textbooks and literature citations characterize rosacea as a disease that gradually evolves from early to later subtypes. However, there is not conclusive evidence to substantiate that course and we want to know if it really occurs. Nevertheless, the individual features within a subtype can get worse, so early treatment is advocated, even if there is not progression from one stage to the next,”

How can Rosacea be treated ?
The best answer is “working with the support of your registered health professional”. There are medications available that control the redness and reduce the number of papules and pustules associated with rosacea.
Current run-of-the-mill treatment might include oral antibiotics and topical metronidazole. One study showed that the use of topical metronidazole alone can help some sufferers to reduce rosacea flare-ups once the rosacea is brought under control.
For those sufferers that do not benefit from the metronidazole based treatments, there are many other options. Quite a few treatments options are often discussed on the rosacea-support email group.
Experts agree that a gentle cleansing regime is very important. Avoiding chemicals that aggravate the rosacea, but will clean and moisturise the skin is a step in the right direction. See also: mild cleanser is important.
As the sun is a strong trigger for many rosacea sufferers, a good non-irritating sunscreen used daily is very important. For those who react badly to chemical sunscreens, a physical sunscreen may be more suitable. Physical sunscreens rely on the reflective properties of the main ingredients (rather than the ability of some chemicals to absorb the sun’s energy). The most common physical sunscreens are based on zinc oxide or titatinium dioxide.
The vitamin A derivative isotretinoin (known as Accutane or Roaccutane), has been shown to be effective against severe papopustular rosacea. It works by inhibiting sebaceous gland function and physically shrinking the glands. It also has potent anti-inflammatory properties, making it ideal to treat resistant rosacea. At low doses, accutane has also been shown to reduce other symptoms such as facial burning and redness. Accutane is a strong drug, and even at the low doses found beneficial to rosacea, should be used under strict supervision of your doctor.
Low does accutane may be more suitable than the regular dose, as there are less side effects and lesser chance of aggravating redness. See also dramatic results with low dose accutane and focus on low-dose accutane.
The mixed light pulse laser – Photoderm is showing promise as a treatment for the vascular component of rosacea. It works by targeting facial microvessels that are damaged.
One treatment that has been shown to help some is Rosacea-LTD III. It is the third generation of topical mineral salt based treatment. The minerals shrink facial vessels as well as reduce papules and pustules. More information is available at http://www.rosacea-ltd.com
For those wanting to treat the flushing side of their rosacea, 2 drugs are worth investigating. Monoxidine and Clonodine are 2 anti-hypertensives that you could look at with your doctor.
From a subjective view of the rosacea-support list members it would appear that one person’s treatment does not necessarily suit another, so your mileage may vary with any recommended treatment. Experiment a little and find what helps you. Depending on the stage of your rosacea, some treatments may be aggravating, while for others the same treatment may not cause problems. Every rosacea patient is unique and needs individual treatment.
Whatever path you choose, the support of a doctor or dermatologist that is willing to work with you will be very important, so shop around until you
are happy with your health professional.

What about steroids ?
Steroids have long been prescribed for rosacea because of their perceived quick relief. Milder (1% hydrocortisone) over the counter preparations are also popular as they are thought to be safer than the prescription strength treatment.
It is worth bearing in mind the following warnings:
over the counter steroids can cause steroid induced rosacea.
“After observation of long-term facial application of even low-dose corticosteroids, we have see many adults and children with a rosacea diathesis in whom severe burning and itching develop, along with bright red papules and nodules.This may occur after long-term application of even low-potency topical corticosteroids.
Application of topical corticosteroids causes immediate vasoconstriction and reduces the redness seen in rosacea and many other skin conditions. However, when patients discontinue usage of the topical corticosteroid, symptoms immediately reappear, and the symptoms are often much worse than those seen in the original condition.”

Can you be cured of Rosacea ?
Perhaps not cured in the sense of cured of a cold, but you can reduced your symptoms to a manageable level. There are plenty of treatment options out there, you may just need to experiment with a few.

Are there any Books about Rosacea I should read ?
There are very few books about Rosacea. In the last year of so there has been a couple of `self help’ books written about rosacea. You can find a
review of a couple of these at http://rosacea-support.org/book-reviews

Are there any non-profit organisations devoted to Rosacea ?
The National Rosacea Society is a non profit organisation set up to provide information about Rosacea. You can find them at http://www.rosacea.org/ They publish newsletters online as well as conduct surveys about rosacea sufferers. Also they make published information available to sufferers via regular mail. The National Rosacea Society are an introductory organisation that are a good first point of contact for information. In the past the NRS has awarded grants for 37 studies into rosacea.

Are there any support groups related to Rosacea ?
There is an email support group that you can subscribe to. This email group is free and unmoderated. Currently there are about 7000 users. To find out more information about the list, visit http://rosacea-support.org or I'm sure there are some on fb.

Info on Soolantra https://www.galderma.com.au/Portals/4/PIs%20and%20CMIs/Soolantra%20Consumer%20Medicine%20Information_150910.pdf

Posted in AtomicBlonde, Bone Health, Flush not Blush, Inflammation, Life, Rosacea

If You Have Rosacea, You’re Not Alone ….Me To

I am one of the estimated 16 million Americans that have rosacea, yet only a small fraction are being treated.
I didn't even know I had it.

Sure my cheeks were pink but it's summer,went to Florida and finally summer is also in Ohio warm hot humid steamy tropical 🌴 like and I love it, my bones thrive in it. So I'm trying to take advantage of it

Unfortunately my cheeks never returned to their natural pale color or even slightly tanned from vacation, they remained looking like I had a slight sunburn but it felt as if someone took a torch to me face then stung me with some rubber bands.

I figured I better get to a skin doctor.

Yep we have confirmed it ROSACEA

It's been linked to several AutoImmune disorders and of course it has its own set of triggers and every one is different

So time to learn about something else….

Heading to the website of the National Rosacea Society since provides information that may help rosacea patients better understand their disorder and more effectively manage its signs and symptoms.