Posted in Awareness

Dealing with Re-Entry Anxiety

When COVID-19 lockdowns were first instituted, it felt, for so many people, unthinkable to have to stay home nearly 24/7.

Except for food and essentials , I also shopped for my mother in law. At first I just went about my business no mask but then when cases added up day to day I started wearing a mask.

I find myself more anxious with a mask on, harder to get good breaths which also is not good for us.

But right now we are suppose to wear them oof in stores , etc

I don’t understand why people wear mask and gloves in the car when they are alone but that’s a topic for a different day.

On occasion people like me going out also felt equally strange and nerve-wracking. I’m not only shopping for us but others as well.

But I did get more comfortable after a few weeks.

Now here we are coming the Re-entry phase everything is open people are everywhere some with masks some without.

The people I talk to have several fears , but to me I am hearing about two distinct types of re-entry anxiety.

Some people are anxious because they have a “lurking fear” of catching or spreading covid19 while others have stopped socializing and are finding it difficult to resume.

A little bit of anxiety can motivate you to follow public-health guidance like social distancing and wearing a mask where it’s required .

But when anxiety starts to interfere with your day-to-day life, it may be a problem. If you’re struggling to find the right balance, try these expert-backed tips for combating re-entry anxiety.

Take baby steps

Exposure therapy“—or safely confronting sources of fear—is the gold-standard treatment for many fear and anxiety disorders. The same tactic may help with re-entry anxiety, says Dr. Ryan Sultan, an assistant professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University’s Irving Medical Center in New York City.

“Don’t go from staying locked in your apartment to taking the subway,” Sultan says. Instead, set progressive small goals that will get you closer to behavior you find scary. For example, you could start with a walk in the park alone, then try chatting with a friend from your window and finally go for a walk together.

If you do feel yourself getting pulled into an anxiety spiral, focus on your breathing. “The simplest way to pull yourself back from that anxiety is to really concentrate on taking controlled, slow, deep breaths,” Sultan says.

Start soon

“Social isolation absolutely has short term mental-health impacts,” Sultan says. “But it potentially also has long-term impacts, and they’re directly proportional to the duration. The longer people avoid things that are making them anxious, the harder they will be to overcome.”

That does not mean you should rush out and socialize just like you did before coronavirus. (Large social gatherings are still not condoned by health experts, and most recommend meeting up outdoors.) But think about what you can do safely right now—perhaps sitting with a friend in your backyard while wearing masks and staying six feet apart—and take steps to do it sooner rather than later.

But think long-term

Sultan says he’s seen multiple patients who are remaining more isolated than necessary because of re-entry anxiety. He asks them a simple question: “Is this the life that you want to live indefinitely?”

Almost invariably, he says, people realize they “miss being outside, seeing their friends, living their life.” Having that moment of realization can motivate people to start taking small steps back toward normal, Sultan says.

Be wary of crutches

Brown says it’s easy for recommended public-health practices, like washing your hands regularly, to spiral into “safety behaviors” that, consciously or subconsciously, you rely on to keep anxiety at bay. Be honest about how these safety behaviors are affecting you. If wiping down your groceries “takes you five minutes and it really helps you,” it’s probably not a big deal, even if it’s not strictly recommended, Brown says. But if you’re spending hours a day cleaning your home, that could be a bigger issue. “It’s never really up to me to decide, ‘Is this behavior a problem?’” Brown says. Ask yourself, “Is it getting in the way of the life you want to be living?”

Recruit a Buddy

Like most behavior changes, quelling re-entry anxiety is easier with a buddy who can both support you and hold you accountable, Brown says.

Similarly, if someone in your life is struggling with re-entry anxiety, try to be their partner through it, Sultan says. “Ask them, ‘What would make you feel more comfortable doing this? Is there something I can do that would help you with that? What’s something you would feel comfortable with us doing?’”

If you find yourself still struggling and don’t know what to do you can also call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s hotline 24/7 at 1-800-662-4357.

They can refer you to a professional to speak with.

Posted in Awareness

Arthritis Pain Do’s and Don’ts

Arthritis pain:

The Do’s and The don’ts

Will physical activity reduce or increase your arthritis pain? Get tips on exercise and other common concerns when coping with arthritis symptoms and arthritis pain.

Arthritis is a leading cause of pain and disability worldwide. You can find plenty of advice about easing the pain of arthritis and other conditions with exercise, medication and stress reduction. How do you know what will work for you?

Here are some do’s and don’ts to help you figure it out

Basics

Whatever your condition, it will be easier to stay ahead of your pain if you:

• Learn all you can about your condition, including what type of arthritis you have and whether any of your joints are already damaged

• Enlist your doctor, friends and family in managing your pain

• Tell your doctor if your pain changes

Everyday routines

Pay attention to your joints, whether sitting, standing or engaging in activity. When we have pain the last thing we want to do is move but often what we should be doing.

• Keep your joints moving. Do daily, gentle stretches that move your joints through their full range of motion.

• Use good posture. A physical therapist can show you how to sit, stand and move correctly.

• Know your limits. Balance activity and rest, and don’t overdo it.

In addition, lifestyle changes are important for easing pain.

• Manage weight. Being overweight can increase complications of arthritis and contribute to more arthritis pain. Making incremental, permanent lifestyle changes resulting in gradual weight loss is often the most effective method of weight management.

• Quit smoking. If you smoke stop. It’s not that hard , I quit smoking and so can you. Smoking causes stress on connective tissues, which can increase arthritis pain.Smoking also slows down the healing process as well as it’s a nasty stinky habit.

Exercise

When you have arthritis, movement can decrease your pain and stiffness, improve your range of motion, strengthen your muscles, and increase your endurance.

What to do

Choose the right kinds of activities those that build the muscles around your joints but don’t damage the joints themselves. A physical or occupational therapist can help you develop an exercise program that’s right for you.

Don’t just go start jogging if you have knee problems or lifting weights if you have back and joint issues.

Always consult your doctor before doing anything!!

Once you get the ok.

Focus on stretching, range-of-motion exercises and gradual progressive strength training. Include low-impact aerobic exercise, such as walking, cycling or water exercises, to improve your mood and help control your weight.

What to avoid

Avoid activities that involve high impact and repetitive motion, such as:

• Running

• Jumping

• Tennis

• High-impact aerobics

• Repeating the same movement, such as a tennis serve, again and again

Medications

Many types of medications are available for arthritis pain relief. Most are relatively safe, but no medication is completely free of side effects. Talk with your doctor to formulate a medication plan for your specific pain symptoms.

What to do

Over-the-counter pain medications, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen sodium (Aleve) can help relieve occasional pain triggered by activity your muscles and joints aren’t used to — such as gardening after a winter indoors. But not everyone can take certain medications again talk to your doctor.

Cream containing capsaicin may be applied to skin over a painful joint to relieve pain, do not use if you have a scratch, cut or open wound. Use alone or with oral medication.

Consult your doctor if over-the-counter medications don’t relieve your pain.

What to avoid

• Overtreatment. Talk with your doctor if you find yourself using over-the-counter pain relievers regularly.

• Undertreatment. Don’t try to ignore severe and prolonged arthritis pain. You might have joint inflammation or damage requiring daily medication.

• Focusing only on pain. Depression is more common in people with arthritis. Doctors have found that treating depression with antidepressants and other therapies reduces not only depression symptoms but also arthritis pain.

Physical and emotional integration

It’s no surprise that arthritis pain has a negative effect on your mood. If everyday activities make you hurt, you’re bound to feel discouraged. But when these normal feelings escalate to create a constant refrain of fearful, hopeless thoughts, your pain can actually get worse and harder to manage.

What to do

Therapies that interrupt destructive mind-body interactions include:

• Cognitive behavioral therapy. This well-studied, effective combination of talk therapy and behavior modification helps you identify — and break — cycles of self-defeating thoughts and actions.

• Relaxation therapy. Meditating, doing yoga, deep breathing, listening to music, being in nature, writing in a journal do whatever helps you relax. There’s no downside to relaxation, and it can help ease pain.

• Acupuncture. Some people get pain relief through acupuncture treatments, when a trained acupuncturist inserts hair-thin needles at specific points on your body. It can take several weeks before you notice improvement.

• Heat and cold. Use of heat, such as applying heating pads to aching joints, taking hot baths or showers, or immersing painful joints in warm paraffin wax, can help relieve pain temporarily. Be careful not to burn yourself. Use heating pads for no more than 20 minutes at a time.
Use of cold, such as applying ice packs to sore muscles, can relieve pain and inflammation after strenuous exercise.

• Massage. Massage might improve pain and stiffness temporarily. Make sure your massage therapist knows where your arthritis affects you.

What to avoid

• Smoking. If you’re addicted to tobacco, you might use it as an emotional coping tool. But it’s counterproductive: Toxins in smoke cause stress on connective tissue, leading to more joint problems.

• A negative attitude. Negative thoughts are self-perpetuating. As long as you dwell on them, they escalate, which can increase your pain and risk of disability. Instead, distract yourself with activities you enjoy, spend time with people who support you and consider talking to a therapist.

Wishing you a pain free day

Deb

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Hearing Loss, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Link-Between Hearing Loss and RA

When we think of hearing loss, you may associate it with your loved one who’s always asking you to repeat yourself, or the friend who may struggle to follow conversations.

Hearing loss is often caused by exposure to excessive noise and is even linked to the natural aging process. But did you know that hearing loss isn’t just caused by your loud job, or the blaring music at the concert ?

Along with lesser known causes of hearing loss like smoking and diabetes, a recent study found a link between hearing loss and rheumatoid arthritis.

 

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease that affects many seniors, though young people can also suffer from the disease. Around 1.5 million Americans have RA, and this number continues to rise. RA is an autoimmune disease, which means that the immune system turns against the body. Rather than protecting the body from sicknesses by warding off viral and bacterial infections, the immune system attacks the joints, causing swelling, inflammation, and pain. RA can damage cartilage and tissue around the joints, disform the joints, and even damage the bone. It becomes painful to move the affected joints, and leads to reduced mobility, and difficulty performing normal daily tasks.

Linking Hearing Loss and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Clinical trials looking at the links between hearing loss and arthritis found far higher rates of hearing loss among those with arthritis. Those with RA were more likely to have sensorineural hearing loss, hearing loss associated with the ear and not the brain. Delicate cells in the inner ear are damaged in this type of hearing loss, and once these cells are damaged, they don’t regenerate. You’ll be unable to hear certain sounds in the environment, since the cells in the ear responsible for those sounds have been destroyed.

A 2006 study found that around 43% of those with RA had hearing loss! And a study from the Mayo Clinic, reported that even though they weren’t able to detect measurably higher rates of hearing loss among those with RA, their patients with RA were far more likely to perceive that they had hearing loss.

 

How does RA Lead to Hearing Loss?

Researchers are still unclear on the how rheumatoid arthritis and hearing loss are linked. However, it’s clear that RA can attack other body systems, not just the joints, so the cells in the ear can also be affected by this disease.

Another link could be the drugs used to treat the pain that goes hand in hand with arthritis. Many studies have found that common pain killers, such as ibuprofen (Advil) and acetaminophen (Tylenol) can cause hearing loss. Even taking these pain killers two or more days per week was linked to worse hearing health, while those who took pain killers six days a week had a 24% higher risk of hearing loss than those who didn’t take pain killers. Those suffering from RA often take a lot of painkillers just to get through the day, and these drugs are known to reduce blood flow and deprive the cells in the inner ear of the oxygen and nutrients they need to survive.

Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis

While doctors can’t cure RA, they all agree that treating the disease as soon as possible is essential for good health outcomes. Treating RA stops inflammation, prevents further joint damage or deformity, and relieves pain. It also improves overall well-being by allowing for increased mobility and physical function. Treatments include medications to ease symptoms, as well as to reduce inflammation and slow joint damage.

Self-management is also important when it comes to RA, and your doctor will help you be proactive in managing the disease and maintaining your overall quality of life. Eating well, exercising often and resting, using heat pads, and learning relaxation techniques all play a role in self-management.

Treating Hearing Loss

If you’ve been struggling to hear, and think it may be linked to your RA, call your local hearing center.

May is Arthritis Awareness Month

Posted in Awareness

Covid19 – Facts When Immune Compromised

 

After more than two months of major societal changes, including strict stay-at-home orders in most states, the closing of U.S. borders, and shutting down non-essential travel and non-essential businesses, many parts of America are beginning to ease restrictions and open back up. With so much uncertainty around the coronavirus (including an ongoing lack of testing and a vaccine months or years away) this news continues to worry patients with chronic conditions who may be at a higher risk for coronavirus complications because of their age or co-occurring health conditions.

Managing a chronic disease such as inflammatory arthritis is stressful enough without having to worry about the ongoing spread of COVID-19.

CreakyJoints spoke with multiple rheumatologists and infectious disease experts to provide information that is specific to this community.

We will update this story as critical information changes.

Coronavirus By the Numbers

Doctors and researchers are continuing to learn more about this novel (new) coronavirus named “coronavirus disease 2019” (“COVID-19”).

Here’s what we do know: The coronavirus outbreak, which originated in Wuhan, China in 2019, has moved its way around the world, with a total of more than 3.5 million detected cases around the world so far and nearly 250,000 deaths.

According to the latest data, the U.S. now has more than 1.2 million confirmed cases across all 50 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico. There have been more than 71,00 deaths linked to coronavirus in the U.S.

While daily cases and deaths have been steadying or declining in many areas of the country, there continue to be spikes and hot spots in others. Public health experts are worried that the loosening of social distancing practices and businesses starting to reopen could lead to another prolonged increase in cases as the summer season begins.

 Coronavirus Risks for Inflammatory Arthritis

Are people with inflammatory arthritis more susceptible to the coronavirus or at a higher risk of complications like pneumonia?

“We don’t yet have data available to quantify this risk at this time,” says rheumatologist Jean Liew, MD, a senior fellow at the University of Washington in Seattle, although research on how the coronavirus is affecting rheumatology patients is underway.

In guidance recently issued from the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and published in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology, the authors state:

“To our knowledge, there is currently no evidence identifying risk factors of poor outcome with COVID-19 that are specific to rheumatic disease … risk factors of poor outcome with COVID-19 include older age and select comorbidity such as chronic lung disease, hypertension, cardiovascular disease (CVD), chronic kidney disease (CKD), obesity and diabetes mellitus, conditions frequently overrepresented in patients with rheumatic disease.”

In other words, based on what is known right now, age and comorbidities seem to be bigger influences on poor outcomes from COVID-19 than having an inflammatory condition alone.

How Inflammatory Conditions Affect Your Immune System

It is important to understand how inflammatory conditions like arthritis affect your immune system.

First, when inflammatory arthritis is not well-controlled (not in remission or low disease activity) your immune system tends to focus on attacking your own body rather than outside threats (like the coronavirus).

This can make you “immunocompromised” and might increase your chance of COVID-19 complications, but more data is needed.

Second, some of the medications used to manage arthritis and inflammatory conditions modify the function of the immune system, which can make patients more vulnerable to infection in general, though more research is needed to understand how various medications affect COVID-19 risk specifically.

Third, many rheumatologic patients have other risk factors or underlying health issues linked to coronavirus complications, such as older age, heart disease, lung disease, diabetes, and obesity.

“[The coronavirus pandemic] is certainly concerning for everyone, especially those who are immunocompromised,” says Nilanjana Bose, MD, MBA, a rheumatologist at the Rheumatology Center of Houston in Pearland, Texas. “We need to exercise more caution and be more alert with these patients.”

The CDC Definition of High-Risk Patients

The CDC defines the following groups as high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19:

  • People aged 65 years and older
  • People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility
  • People of all ages with underlying medical conditions, particularly if not well controlled, including chronic lung disease, moderate to severe asthma, serious heart conditions, severe obesity, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, liver disease
  • People who are immunocompromised from cancer treatment, smoking, bone marrow or organ transplantation, immune deficiencies, poorly controlled HIV or AIDS, and prolonged use of corticosteroids and other immune-weakening medications

If you have risk factors that place you at a possible higher risk for coronavirus complications, it is natural to feel ongoing worry and anxiety as the pandemic ensues. These tips can help.

How to Stay Healthy During the Coronavirus Pandemic

Here is what you should do to stay safe and healthy during the coronavirus pandemic.

1. Know coronavirus symptoms

According to the CDC, symptoms usually appear within two to 14 days of being exposed to the virus. People with COVID-19 can have a wide range of symptoms, ranging from mild to severe, and new symptoms have been added since the beginning of the pandemic:

  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat

Keep in mind that because coronavirus symptoms can vary from mild to severe, you shouldn’t necessarily panic if you develop any of them.

Call your rheumatologist or primary care doctor right away to determine next steps. Do not go to see your doctor or an urgent care center in person without calling first so they can advise on precautions, where to go, and how to arrive safely.

Many patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases have concerns about coronavirus symptoms possibly overlapping with those of their underlying chronic conditions.

Read more about coronavirus symptoms in autoimmune and chronic illness patients.

2. Understand how coronavirus spreads

“Coronavirus is a respiratory illness and spread very readily through close contact,” says William Schaffner, MD, a professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee— for instance, if an infected person coughs or sneezes less than six feet away from you.

Some studies suggest that COVID-19 may be spread by people who are not showing symptoms, which is why the CDC now recommends wearing cloth face masks in public.

Coronavirus may also be spread through an airborne route, which, according to Johns Hopkins, means “that tiny droplets remaining in the air could cause disease in others even after the ill person is no longer near.”

You may also contract coronavirus by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it, and then by touching your mouth, nose, or eyes. According to a study by the National Institutes of Health, CDC, UCLA and Princeton University scientists, published in The New England Journal of Medicinecoronavirus is detectable on the following:

  • Aerosols: up to three hours
  • Copper: up to four hours
  • Cardboard: up to 24 hours
  • Plastic and stainless steel: up to two to three days

3. Stop the spread of germs

Washing your hands (for at least 20 seconds with soap and water) is the hands-down (pun intended) winner when it comes to preventing the spread of germs. Here’s a video from the World Health Organization that shows proper hand washing techniques.

The CDC also advises such commonsense measures as:

  • Avoiding touching your mouth, nose, and eyes
  • Avoiding people who are coughing and sneezing
  • Cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched objects and surfaces
  • Practicing social distancing, which includes staying at least six feet away from other people and not gathering in large groups
  • Wearing cloth face masks in public places

4. Stay home as much as possible

Even as stay-at-home mandates become lifted across the U.S., the CDC continues to urge people at higher risk of COVID-19 complications to stay home as much as possible. If you do need to go out — to go to a doctor appointment or pharmacy — wear a mask and practice social distancing.

Grocery stores are best avoided if you are at higher risk, so utilize online grocery delivery service or curbside pick-up or ask a family member or friend to pick up essentials for you.

Continue to avoid unnecessary errands.

5. Maintain healthy lifestyle habits

The same lifestyle habits that you follow to help your immune system to function optimally are important for staying well during the coronavirus pandemic.

Another thing to keep in mind is to avoid taking “immune booster” supplements, says rheumatologist Doug Roberts, MD, an assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California Davis Medical School. “Some of these may interfere with the immunomodulating effects of your DMARDs [disease-modifying medications].”

It is always a good idea to get your doctor’s approval for any over-the-counter supplements.

6. Maintain your usual medication regimen

The biggest concerns among patients with rheumatologic and inflammatory conditions throughout the coronavirus pandemic have had to do with medications and their potential effects on infection risk.

Medications commonly used to treat inflammatory arthritis and related conditions, including corticosteroids, DMARDs, biologics, and JAK inhibitors do modify the immune system, but many questions remain about their impact on COVID-19 specifically.

There is not yet definitive evidence whether certain medications are causing worse outcomes for patients, or, on the flip side, are even possibly protective against COVID-19 complications.

The most important message is this: You should not stop taking any medications or adjust your dose of any medications without first talking to your doctor.

In general, if you don’t have COVID-19 and are stable on your current regimen, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) recommends that you stick with the following medications:

  • Hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine
  • Sulfasalazine
  • Methotrexate
  • Leflunomide
  • Immunosuppressants (such as tacrolimus and cyclosporine)
  • Biologics
  • Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

The guidance suggests that patients on corticosteroids should take the lowest possible dose to manage symptoms because they can increase your risk of infection, even more so than other types of disease-modifying medications.

If you are exposed to COVID-19 or have a known coronavirus infection, your doctor might suggest you stop certain medications while you fight the infection and then resume them once you have recovered.

Never make any changes to your medication regimen without first discussing them with your doctor.

7. Stay in touch with your doctors and manage your chronic conditions

It is important to make sure your inflammatory conditions are well-controlled. Arthritis that is flaring means that your immune system may be less able to fight off infection.

If you are experiencing pain, fatigue, or other symptoms, contact your doctor. Many doctors are utilizing telemedicine appointments to see patients, so you may not necessarily need to see your doctor in person.

Read more about how practices are implementing telehealth.

If your doctor wants you to come for an in-person visit, know that offices have dramatically changed their environments and systems to ensure safety for patients (as well as for their doctors, nurses, and staff).

You can ask your doctor’s office about their rules. Many changes including taking patients’ temperatures and checking for coronavirus symptoms upon arrival, ensuring social distancing in waiting rooms or eliminating waiting rooms altogether, and limiting the number of patients in the office at one time — not to mention disinfecting measures and personal protective equipment (PPE).

The bottom line for now: The coronavirus has certainly dramatically changed all of our lives and continues to raise concerns for those who may be at a higher risk for infection and complications. For now, keep this advice in mind to stay healthy, safe, and calm:

  • Practice social distancingand good handwashing and hygiene habits per public health guidance
  • Take care of your mental health and wellness with stress management, healthy eating, and physical activity
  • Remain on your current medications and never stop or change a medication without talking to your doctor
  • Stay in touch with your doctor and keep your appointments (either in person or telemedicine)

Get Free Coronavirus Support for Chronic Illness Patients

Join the Global Healthy Living Foundation’s free COVID-19 Support Program for chronic illness patients and their families. We will be providing updated information, community support, and other resources tailored specifically to your health and safety. Join now.

Sources

 

SUSAN JARAMORE FROM AUTHOR

 

immune3

 

Posted in Awareness

Happy Easter

Easter is my favorite holiday because of the significance it holds for me as a Christian.

It is the day we remember the rising of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. It’s the day he triumphed over the grave, saved us from our sins and gave meaning to our world. Without his rising from the grave, all the rest of it would be meaningless. He triumphed over death and gave us life!

It may seem like the world will never be normal again.

But it will

It’s still a joyous time of the year.

Our savior has risen- Hallelujah

This Joyous Time of Year

May the glory

and the promise

of this joyous time of year

bring peace- health and

happiness to you

and all those you hold most dear.

And may Christ,

Our Risen Savior,

always be there by your side

to bless you

most abundantly

and be your loving guide.

Happy Easter

💕

Deb

Posted in Awareness

Medicare and Covid19 Testing and Hospitalization

Coronavirus test

Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers a test to see if you have coronavirus (officially called 2019-novel coronavirus or COVID-19). This test is covered when your doctor or other health care provider orders it.

Your costs in Original Medicare

You pay nothing for this test.

What it is

Tests done to help your doctor diagnose or rule out a suspected illness or condition.  In some circumstances, a home health nurse, laboratory technician, or an appropriately-trained medical assistant may give you this test in your home. 

Things to know

Medicare also covers preventive tests and screenings to help prevent, find, or manage a medical problem.

Related resources

Center for Disease Control’s response to the coronavirus

Inpatient hospital care

Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) covers inpatient hospital care when all of these are true:

  • You’re admitted to the hospital as an inpatient after an official doctor’s order, which says you need inpatient hospital care to treat your illness or injury.
  • The hospital accepts Medicare.
  • In certain cases, the Utilization Review Committee of the hospital approves your stay while you’re in the hospital.

Your costs in Original Medicare

Note

See how Medicare is responding to Coronavirus.

Note

Your doctor or other health care provider may recommend you get services more often than Medicare covers. Or, they may recommend services that Medicare doesn’t cover. If this happens, you may have to pay some or all of the costs. Ask questions so you understand why your doctor is recommending certain services and whether Medicare will pay for them.

What it is

Medicare-covered hospital services include:

  • Semi-private rooms
  • Meals
  • General nursing
  • Drugs as part of your inpatient treatment
  • Other hospital services and supplies

Things to know

Inpatient mental health care in a psychiatric hospital is limited to 190 days in a lifetime.

Inpatient hospital care includes care you get in:

  • Acute care hospitals
  • Critical access hospitals
  • Inpatient rehabilitation facilities
  • Long-term care hospitals
  • Inpatient care as part of a qualifying clinical research study
  • Mental health care

Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance)

covers your doctors’ services you get while you’re in a hospital.

This doesn’t include:

  • Private-duty nursing
  • Private room (unless medically necessary )
  • Television and phone in your room (if there’s a separate charge for these items)
  • Personal care items, like razors or slipper socks

Medicare & Coronavirus

How to stay up to date:

  • Coronavirus.gov is the source for the latest information about COVID-19 prevention, symptoms, and answers to common questions. 
  • CDC.gov/coronavirus has the latest public health and safety information from CDC and for the overarching medical and health provider community on COVID-19.
  • USA.gov has the latest information about what the U.S. Government is doing in response to COVID-19.

Medicare wants to help protect you from COVID-19:

Your health, safety, and welfare in the face of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) is our highest priority. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), older adults and people who have severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung, or kidney disease seem to be at higher risk for more serious COVID-19 illness.  This means that most people with Medicare are at higher risk.

Follow the President’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America

Visit Whitehouse.gov for the full set of guidelines. Here are some critical ways for you to do your part:

  • Listen to and follow the directions of your state and local authorities.
  • Keep the entire household at home if someone in your household has tested positive for coronavirus. 
  • If you’re an older person or if you’re a person with a serious underlying health condition that can put you at increased risk (like a condition that impairs your lung or heart function or weakens your immune system), stay home and away from other people.

Slow the spread of coronavirus

All of us must do our part to slow the spread of the Coronavirus. Here’s how to help:

  • Avoid social gatherings in groups of more than 10 people.
  • Avoid close contact (6 feet, which is about two arm lengths) with people who are sick.
  • Work or engage in schooling from home whenever possible.
  • Avoid eating or drinking at bars, restaurants, and food courts — use drive-thru, pickup, or delivery options.
  • Avoid discretionary travel, shopping trips, and social visits.

Hygiene precautions to take now

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after being out in public, blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • To the extent possible, avoid touching high-touch surfaces in public places, like elevator buttons, door handles, handrails, and handshaking with people. Use a tissue or your sleeve to cover your hand or finger if you must touch something.
  • Avoid touching your face, nose, and eyes.
  • Clean and disinfect your home to remove germs: Practice routine cleaning of frequently touched surfaces—tables, doorknobs, light switches, handles, desks, toilets, faucets, sinks and cell phones.

Preparing for healthcare needs

  • Be sure you have over-the-counter medicines and medical supplies (like tissues) to treat fever and other symptoms. Most people will be able to recover from COVID-19 at home.
  • Have enough household items and groceries on hand so that you’ll be prepared to stay at home for a period of time.

Coping with stress

Older people are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 which may result in increased stress during a crisis. Here are a few things you can do to cope with that stress:

  • Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories and social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body. Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced meals, exercise regularly, get plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind. Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others. Talk with people you trust about your concerns and how you are feeling.
  • Call your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row.
  • If you, or someone you care about, are feeling overwhelmed with emotions like sadness, depression, or anxiety, or feel like you want to harm yourself or others, call 
    • 911
    • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) Disaster Distress Helpline: 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 (TTY: 1-800-846-8517).

Medicare covers related needs

  • Medicare covers the lab tests for COVID-19. You pay no out-of-pocket costs.
  • Medicare covers all medically necessary hospitalizations. This includes if you’re diagnosed with COVID-19 and might otherwise have been discharged from the hospital after an inpatient stay, but instead you need to stay in the hospital under quarantine.
  • At this time, there’s no vaccine for COVID-19. However, if one becomes available, it will be covered by all Medicare Prescription Drug Plans (Part D)
  • If you have a Medicare Advantage Plan, you have access to these same benefits. Medicare allows these plans to waive cost-sharing for COVID-19 lab tests. Many plans offer additional telehealth benefits beyond the ones described below. Check with your plan about your coverage and costs.
  • Scammers may use the coronavirus national emergency to take advantage of people while they’re distracted. As always, guard your Medicare card like a credit card, check Medicare claims summary forms for errors, and if someone calls asking for your Medicare Number, hang up!

Telehealth & related services 

Medicare has temporarily expanded its coverage of telehealth services to respond to the current Public Health Emergency. These services expand the current telehealth covered services, to help you have access from more places (including your home), with a wider range of communication tools (including smartphones), to interact with a range of providers (such as doctors, nurse practitioners, clinical psychologists, and licensed clinical social worker). During this time, you will be able to receive a specific set of services through telehealth including evaluation and management visits (common office visits), mental health counseling and preventive health screenings without a copayment if you have Original Medicare. This will help ensure you are able to visit with your doctor from your home, without having to go to a doctor’s office or hospital, which puts you and others at risk of exposure to COVID-19.

  • You may be able to communicate with your doctors or certain other practitioners without necessarily going to the doctor’s office in person for a full visit. Medicare pays for “virtual check-ins”—brief, virtual services with your physician or certain practitioners where the communication isn’t related to a medical visit within the previous 7 days and doesn’t lead to a medical visit within the next 24 hours (or soonest appointment available). 
  • You need to consent verbally to using virtual check-ins and your doctor must document that consent in your medical record before you use this service. You pay your usual Medicare coinsurance and deductible for these services. 
  • Medicare also pays for you to communicate with your doctors using online patient portals without going to the doctor’s office. Like the virtual check-ins, you must initiate these individual communications. 
  • If you live in a rural area, you may use communication technology to have full visits with your doctors. The law requires that these visits take place at specified sites of service, known as telehealth originating sites, and get services using a real-time audio and video communication system at the site to communicate with a remotely located doctor or certain other types of practitioners. Medicare pays for many medical visits through this telehealth benefit. 

Other ways Medicare is helping

Every day, Medicare is responsible for developing and enforcing the essential health and safety requirements that health care providers must meet. When you go to a healthcare provider, you expect a certain standard of care, and we work to make sure you get it. That includes taking additional steps in response to coronavirus:

  • Taking aggressive actions and exercising regulatory flexibilities to help healthcare providers and Medicare health plans.
  • As part of an effort to address the urgent need to increase capacity to care for patients, hospitals can now provide hospital services in other healthcare facilities and sites that aren’t currently considered part of a healthcare facility. This includes off-site screenings.
  • Waiving certain requirements for skilled nursing facility care.
  • Establishing new codes to allow providers to correctly bill for services related to diagnosis and treatment of the illness.
  • Instructing our national network of State Survey Agencies and Accrediting Organizations to focus all their efforts on infection prevention and other cases of abuse and neglect in nursing homes and hospitals.
  • Instructing nursing homes and hospitals to review their infection control procedures, which they’re required to maintain at all times.
  • Issuing important guidance answering questions that nursing homes may have with respect to addressing cases of COVID-19.

Related resources

Posted in Awareness

Everyone Can Get Covid19 A Must Read for RA and Lupus Patients or anyone taking Plaquenil

I am not picking in our POTUS because whether you like him or dislike him he has a really tough job, that being said we must know the facts about Plaquenil and stop some of guessing games. I don’t know if he was given misinformation but from what I have read there is not evidence that this study even exists. see below for full information

You may have seen recent headlines suggesting that people with lupus, an autoimmune disease that affects about 1.5 million Americans, don’t contract coronavirus because many of them take hydroxychloroquine.

This information is not true, and the Global Healthy Living Foundation needs to set the record straight based on data and medical expertise.

Hydroxychloroquine — a first-line lupus therapy that is also commonly used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatologic conditions — is currently being studied as a potential treatment for COVID-19 because of its anti-viral properties. But there is no conclusive evidence of its benefits for covid19 yet.

During a White House briefing Saturday April 4, President Trump suggested there was possibly some research showing that lupus patients did not get coronavirus. The implication was that perhaps taking hydroxychloroquine was protecting them. Maybe I misunderstood what was being said.

And as I said I will not pick on the POTUS because he really has a tough job , now more than ever.

“They should look at the lupus thing. I don’t know what it says, but there’s a rumor out there that because it takes care of lupus very effectively as I understand it, and it’s a, you know, a drug that’s used for lupus,” President Trump said during the briefing. “So there’s a study out there that says people that have lupus haven’t been catching this virus. Maybe it’s true, maybe it’s not.”

It is not true.

Emerging Data on Lupus Patients and COVID-19

A couple of weeks ago, as the coronavirus pandemic was massively increasing in scale and impact, rheumatology researchers from around the globe started collaborating to collect data on patients with such conditions as lupus to answer questions exactly like this. Do patients with autoimmune conditions fare differently from COVID-19 than the general population? Do certain medications lead to better or worse outcomes?

The registry is called the COVID-19 Global Rheumatology Alliance. (The Global Healthy Living Foundation and its arthritis patient community CreakyJoints was one of its first members and advisers.) More data is being collected daily and certainly it is too early to make any definitive conclusions about COVID-19 in rheumatology patients, but the data so far show that:

  1. Lupus patients do, in fact, get COVID-19.
  2. Many of them are taking hydroxychloroquine at the time of their diagnosis.

According to information from the registry shared over the last few days on Twitter, the registry now has data on 110 patients. Most patients have rheumatoid arthritis (36 percent), followed by psoriatic arthritis and lupus (17 percent each).

On April 2 — two days before the President’s recent statements about lupus and hydroxychloroquine — the registry Tweeted: “One frequently asked question: Over 25% of patients who developed a COVID-19 were on HCQ [hydroxychloroquine] at the time of diagnosis.”

Last night, the registry tweeted: “Based on early data currently available in our registry, we are not able to report any evidence of a protective effect from hydroxychloroquine against COVID-19. A randomized, controlled trial would be the only way to study this to get a reliable answer to this question.”

Rheumatologists who treat patients with lupus are concerned about rumors suggesting patients are less susceptible to COVID-19.

Misinformation like this puts patients at risk, says rheumatologist Grace C. Wright, MD, PhD, founder and president of the Association of Women in Rheumatology (AWIR). “There is no data that hydroxychloroquine is protective against contracting COVID-19.” She, and many other rheumatologists the Global Healthy Living Foundation has spoken with over the last several days and weeks, worry that it could be a serious issue if people who take hydroxychloroquine mistakenly think they are protected from infection.

Rheumatologist Robin K. Dore, MD, clinical professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, shared this message on her patient portal:

To Dr. Dore’s patients who are taking Plaquenil (hydroxychloroquine), there is no evidence that this medication prevents one from developing a COVID-19 infection. This medication is now being studied to determine if it lessens the severity of the infection once a person has developed the disease. Dr. Dore urges you to continue social distancing, hand washing, and wearing a face covering when you are out in the public. Do not feel that you are immune to the virus if you are taking Plaquenil. Further updates will follow as appropriate.

Concerns About Access to Hydroxychloroquine

Other parts of the White House briefing continued to exacerbate fears among lupus and other rheumatology patients about having access to hydroxychloroquine, which has been in short supply due to its current use as an experimental COVID-19 therapy.

President Trump urged Americans to take the medication: “What do you have to lose? Take it. I really think they should take it. But it’s their choice. And it’s their doctor’s choice or the doctors in the hospital. But hydroxychloroquine. Try it, if you’d like.”

Messages like these could further impact the availability of this crucial medication for people who take it every day to prevent complications from lupus and other conditions.

We have written before about how denying hydroxychloroquine prescriptions to rheumatology patients, which is occurring in the Kaiser Permanente health care system in California right now, for example, is dangerous and even life-threatening. We have also explained how hydroxychloroquine is used to treat lupus and other rheumatologic conditions. To reiterate some of those key points:

“If a patient has to stop taking hydroxychloroquine, they are more likely to experience a flare,” says Ashira Blazer, MD, a rheumatologist at NYU Langone Health in New York City whose clinical research focuses on lupus. “And the last thing we want is for patients not to be able to take a drug that is helping them, then flare, then require heavier immunosuppressing drugs, then be more immunocompromised, and then contract COVID-19.”

“Hydroxychloroquine is a safe, effective, and inexpensive therapy for conditions like lupus and rheumatoid arthritis,” says Dr. Blazer. “If there is a big shortage, it will exacerbate health disparities. People who need an effective and affordable drug won’t be able to get it. There is a risk of mortality, especially for minority women who are disproportionately affected by serious lupus complications, if hydroxychloroquine is not made available to our most vulnerable patients.”

Experiencing Issues Accessing Hydroxychloroquine? Tell Us

If you are a patient living with a chronic illness and are having trouble getting access to hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil), we want to hear from you. Click here to share your story with us.

Get Free Coronavirus Support for Chronic Illness Patients

Join the Global Healthy Living Foundation’s free COVID-19 Support Program for chronic illness patients and their families. We will be providing updated information, community support, and other resources tailored specifically to your health and safety. Join now.

Video

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.forbes.com/sites/carlieporterfield/2020/04/04/trump-makes-claim-about-lupus-and-coronavirus-but-maybe-its-false/amp/

Posted in Awareness

What happens inside the body with covid19

The short on covid19 and what happens inside the body

It happens when someone infected with covid19 lets it out via a cough or sneeze

You can’t see it- but the droplet makes it’s way into someone else say their nose eyes or mouth

The virus

It can find its way deep inside the lungs. And hides and invades the cells in the air sacks in the lung.

They then high jack our cells machinery and uses our own body to replicate and grown more invaders , that tips off our immune system saying hey!!! Somethings wrong send help.

So the body sending in white blood cells to fight off the infection- but this causes the infection and now inflammation to produce pneumonia .

Which is fluid building up inside the air sac inside the lungs and this can become severe -So severe it can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

ARDS is the reason many will lose their life .

So please wash your hands often, keep them away from your face , cover your cough or sneeze with your elbow.

Better yet- Stay home.

Stop thinking it won’t happen to you.

Because you may be near someone who is infected and has no symptoms at all they you bring it home to a child spouse or elderly parent or grandparent.

Stay home 15 days

Wishing everyone a happy and healthy day.

Deb Andio.

Reference

Cleveland Clinic

https://health.clevelandclinic.org/heres-the-damage-coronavirus-covid-19-can-do-to-your-lungs/amp/

Phone is also attached to link of reference.

Posted in Awareness

Make your own hand sanitizer

 

When it comes to preventing the spread of infectious diseases like colds , flu, and now COVID-19, nothing beats good old-fashioned hand washing. 

But if water and soap aren’t available, your next best option, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)Trusted Source, is to use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

Unless you have a stockpile of store-bought hand sanitizer, you’ll likely have a hard time finding any at a store or online right now. Due to the rapid spread of t covid19 most retailers can’t keep up with the demand for hand sanitizer.

And you will find price gouging all over the internet and  SHAME on YOU that takes advantage of others !

The good news? All it takes is two-three ingredients to make your own hand sanitizer at home. Read on to find out how.

 

Making your own hand sanitizer is easy to do and only requires a few ingredients:

The key to making an effective, germ-busting hand sanitizer is to stick to a 2:1 proportion of alcohol to aloe vera. This keeps the alcohol content around 60 percent. This is the minimum amount needed to kill most germs, according to the CDCTrusted Source.

 

Hand sanitizer recipe

What you’ll need: 

  • 3/4 cup of isopropyl or rubbing alcohol (90-99 percent)
  • 1/4 cup of aloe vera gel (to help keep your hands smooth and to counteract the harshness of alcohol) I like
    Fruit of the Earth Aloe Vera 100% Gel Crystal Clear but as long as its pure aloe it should be good and should not cost more than 6 – 8 bucks for a 24 oz size
    isopropyl or rubbing alcohol (90-99 percent) costs 1-2 bucks
    optional for scent
  • 3 drops of essential oil, such as lavender oil, eucalyptus, orange or you can use lemon juice instead. Too much will dry out your skin.

Directions:

  • Pour all ingredients into a bowl, ideally one with a pouring spout like a glass measuring container.
  • Mix with a spoon and then beat with a whisk to turn the sanitizer into a gel.
  • Pour the ingredients into an empty bottle or spray bottles for easy use, and label it “hand sanitizer.”

Keep out of reach of children

The information provided on this site is opinion and entertainment only and is not ever intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional.

You should not use the information on this site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment.

Deb Andio

Posted in Awareness

What to do if you suddenly run out of energy-spoons when traveling

I love to travel but when I do, I know when I get home I will be wiped out by fatigue for sometimes 2-3-4 days.

This little mini trip was no exception.

Fatigue can often be described in various ways. Sometimes it is described as feeling a lack of energy and motivation (both mental and physical).

I had the privilege of going to Washington DC the last week of February 2020.

I participated in rare disease week, spoke on Capitol Hill seen so many historical places and also participated in a focus group.

It really was an amazing trip.

It was also exhausting.

I pushed my body to the limit, correction beyond my limit. I walked far too many steps than I was used to. But ya know what I did it, I made it sure it was tiring but I made it.

And I would do it all over again.

Of course I am paying the price now as I was literally exhausted for 3 days after I got back home.

But I enjoyed every minute of it.

A few things also caused me to use up a lot of my saved energy or spoons

Example: On the last night in Washington DC after I attended a focus group , I wanted to go on a bus tour for like an hour or 2, see some monuments at night but I was tired

I called the consiere who said the trolly picks you up at the hotel and brings you back to the hotel. I was sold and went on a night tour, we went to MLK monument, Jefferson,Back to Capitol at night, the White House , Korean War vet and Vietnam memorial, Lincoln monument, Arlington cemetery and lastly the Iwo Jima memorial, one of out lasts stops.

I was feeling great tired yes but invigorated from this tour, a woman younger than me also on the tour who had MS lost her balance when she was walking to the Iwo Jima memorial her cane went flying she fell, and as she was going down she tried to grab onto me and this caused me and a young man to also lose balance and so I fell, and he did to but he kind of rolled.

I however hit the ground so hard knee first I thought I shattered it.

All I did was pray dear GOD protect me , please don’t let this be the way my trip ends.

Thankfully this happened at the end of the tour. I felt pain and numbness but I also felt my knee swelling fast.

The tour bus dropped me off at the Capitol Hilton

I hobbled to my room after the tour starving, ordered room service cleaned my knee which by now was the size of a grapefruit .

I was hurting scared and a bit pissed off, should I go to the ER? Do I just wait when I get home tomorrow?

I called the George Washington Hospital and was told they are full of flu patients would have at least a 6 hour wait but I could come in.

I chose to wait.

I don’t think the woman on the tour meant to do that. It’s a natural reaction to reach out and stop from falling.

I think I was also so tired I just couldn’t keep myself from falling. That’s what pissed me off.

All my energy just went down the drain. I was hurt exhausted and I mean I was hurt.

I probably should have went to the ER

I chose to tough it out. Hobbled and got 2 buckets full of ice and made my own ice packs from zip lock bags wash cloth and hair scrunchie.

Oh I needed energy and was totally depleted but I had to dig deep and get moving for that ice.

All that great mojo was gone in an instant.

We cannot store up extra energy or “spoons” to use later unfortunately so sometimes we have a tendency to over do it when we feel good. And then when shit happens it’s exhausting.

Room service came with my leg propped up , so I ate and went to bed. The pain was so intense I was worried how the hell was going to make it through the airport the next day.

People see you are doing ok and this can lead them to assumptions – Some people thinking your suddenly well because you had a few good days .

People just don’t realize how much pain a person may be in because it’s an invisible disability.

People also don’t realize that a few goods days is exhausting.

And when you get hurt and you already suffer from chronic pain I swear it’s intensified 10 fold.

I’m usually a happy person and pain or no pain I am grateful that I am alive and can move.

That night I did all I could not to cry.

One thing pain has taught me is how to deal with pain.

I wish I didn’t have pain I hate it because pain is more than an occasional visitor in my body it’s more like a permanent unwelcome tenant.

Every time I feel a bit better something happens and the flipping pain is back all over again.

Most people have no idea what living with chronic pain is like.

I used to get offended when people would not recognize chronic joint pain as a disability.

I would love to see many of those who think that oh joint pain is no big deal do what I do in a day with the level of pain I have and still be as happy as I am.

Because I am happy, I just have to pace myself.

My life is all about pacing.

This is because everything I do cook, clean, sleep, walk, blog, travel, advocate,it all takes time. This gradual approach to every aspect of my life is not only about enlightenment or mindfulness.

It is about pain. Or more specifically, trying minimize it. Minimizing it is the key because I’ve learned it just can’t be avoided, at least not entirely, no matter my effort.

So take those spoons and energy and live your best life . You cannot store spoons but you can learn what to do when your spoons run out .

And remember rest even when your on vacation, eat well so you can be strong and hopefully you come home in the same shape as when you left.

It’s been a week since I’ve been home knee still swollen like a grapefruit

I did ho see my ortho and had xrays. I have a bad bone bruise and a lot of soft tissue swelling

It’s gonna take 4-6 at least I was told weeks and I hope it is back to where it was before the fall.

I’ll keep you updated

Please send positive vibes

Thanks

Deb

Also if you don’t know about spoon theory here is a good link

https://www.healthline.com/health/spoon-theory-chronic-illness-explained-like-never-before#1

Posted in Awareness

Rare Week In Washington DC

I had an amazing experience participating in Rare Week in Washington DC.

I arrived Feb 25 and left Feb 29, 2020.

Rare Disease Week on Capitol Hill brings rare disease community members from across the country together to be educated on federal legislative issues, meet other advocates, and share their unique stories with legislators.

I arrived empowered and I left empowered and my advocacy on on fire and I was exhausted and yet rejuvenated all at the same time.

This was my first time on Capitol Hill and it will not be my last.

I met so many amazing people.

I also participated in a focus group which was the main reason why I went but the opportunity cane to go a few days earlier and I took advantage of that time.

hosted by the Rare Disease Legislative Advocates (RDLA), a program of the EveryLife Foundation for Rare Diseases, is designed to educate and activate advocates and to foster relationships within the community.

900 RARE DISEASE ADVOCATES

393 MEETINGS WITH CONGRESS

227 PATIENT ORGANIZATIONS

1 AMAZING RARE DISEASE WEEK!

I spoke on Capitol Hill, Met one of my Senators for Ohio.

Spoke up about Osteonecrosis and how we need better treatment options like prp injections,stem cell injections, clinical trials and getting new treatments covered by insurance also I discussed osteoarthritis and how it can be debilitating as well.

I passed out 200 copies of my Osteonecrosis booklet to people on Capitol Hill thanked several for issuing proclamations for November 29 becoming Osteonecrosis Awareness Day in many States my goal Is all states.

I then toured that amazing and beautiful town of our nation’s capital.

Took a night tour that was amazing until a lady tripped and grabbed me causing me also to go down.

Blasted my knee and it looks like a water balloon but thank God it’s not broken.

Rare Week Capitol Hill February 2020

I had an amazing experience and I am so grateful I got the opportunity to go and I look for to being in Washington DC more often.

Posted in Awareness

Happy New Year – And New Decade

My last post of 2019 and looking forward to the New Year and also a new decade.

I would like to take this time to thank you all for reading and following my blog. I am grateful for each one of you.

Tonight isn’t your typical New Year’s Eve. The world is welcoming not just the new year, but the next decade. The 2020s! That’s pretty awesome !

That happens, only once every ten years.

Each new year offers us all an exciting opportunity for a fresh start and new beginnings, which is probably why we all look forward to New Year’s Eve so much.

No matter what your goals are for the coming year are or how many new year’s resolutions you plan on making for 2020, ringing in the start of a new year and a new decade is a moment to acknowledge.

One,

to celebrate and recap all of your experiences good and bad from 2019

and

Two

to welcome the new year ahead.

Now is the time to let old troubles and worries go.

Vow to be a better you.

Wishing you all a Happy – Healthy – Joyous -Safe -Enlightening -Spiritual Prosperous New Year.

Quotes for the new year

“Life is all about change, sometimes it’s painful, sometimes it’s joyful sometimes it’s frustrating and sometimes it’s beautiful, but most of the time it’s all the above .” 

Deborah Andio

The first step towards getting somewhere is to decide you’re not going to stay where you are.”

J.P. Morgan

“Celebrate endings—for they precede new beginnings.”

Jonathan Lockwood Huie

“Your present circumstances don’t determine where you can go. They merely determine where you start.”

Nido Qubein

New Year’s Prayer

Let us live each day in the most loving ways, the God-conscious way. Let us serve all who are in need, regardless of race, color or creed.

May your year be filled with peace, prosperity and love. May God’s blessings shower upon you and bestow upon each of you a bright, healthy and peaceful new year

Amen.