Posted in awards,patient leader, Awareness

WEGOHealth Awards2019©

Wow I am beyond honored I’ve now also been

Nominated for Patient Leader Hero- Healthcare Collaborator – Rookie of The Year and Best In Show Blog

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Endorsements Now Open If You Would Like to Vote (link below)

I have been nominated for the past few years in various categories

Thank You for considering Endorsing my nominations

It’s deeply appreciated

My Profile and Info WEGOHealth Link

Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis Education

FlexitarianForLife

My Links

https://avascularnecrosiseducation.com/

www.ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com

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https://flexitarianforlife.wordpress.com/

 

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Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Chronic Pain, Clinical Trials, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Hashimoto, Hypothyroidism, Life, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, SPONK, Stem Cell, StopTheClot, Support Group, Hope, The Mighty, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards, wellness

WEGOHealth Awards and How to Nominate Others

I’m honored to say I’ve been nominated for the #WEGOHealthAwards! These awards seek to recognize Patient Leaders who are making an impact with their advocacy. Learn more – nominate today.

Here’s how you can also nominate others who educate, advocate and make a difference!

Click link below

WEGOHealth Awards and Nomination Info

WEGOHealth Awards Link To Information

Think about the advocates and influencers you see leading Facebook groups, blogging about their health journey, speaking up and giving insights to healthcare companies, presenting on national stages, and running Twitter chats.

Patient Leaders have started non-profits, published podcast episodes, and authored books – there is no shortage of Patient Leaders’ contributions to the world, so let’s recognize as many of them as we can for their talents, contributions, and commitment.

Feel free to add their names and web info also in my comment section! And they can get some recognition here to !

Have a Great Day Everyone

Posted in Adrenals, Awareness, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Diagnosed, Ease your Stress, Endocrinologist, Hashimoto, Meditation, Mindfulness, Naturopath, Thoughts, Uncategorized, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards

Adrenal Fatigue

I find that more I learn about Naturopath’s the more I trust them. They explain things better, they take time to listen to you,they think outside the box.

My Naturopath Dr Danni is great she listens, actively listens when you talk to her.

My endocrinologist hears but doesn’t really listen. This happens often.

He finally listened to me when I asked for a Thyroid Antibody rest because I had a feeling for years I had Hashimoto and hypothyroidism. I mean you can’t feel this exhausted and foggy for no reason.

But many just snubbed me thinking they knew more than I did.

I was also told by many MDs adrenal fatigue doesn’t really exist……really?

So I did some checking…..

What Is It?

The term “adrenal fatigue” was coined in 1998 by James Wilson, PhD, a naturopath and expert in alternative medicine. He describes it as a “group of related signs and symptoms (a syndrome) that results when the adrenal glands function below the necessary level.” He says it’s usually associated with intense stress and often follows chronic infections like bronchitis, flu, or pneumonia.

Wilson says people with it may not have any physical signs of illness but still may feel tired, “gray,” and have fatigue that doesn’t get better with sleep. They also crave salty snacks.

The Theory Behind It

Your body’s immune system responds by slowing down when you’re under stress. Your adrenal glands, which are small organs above your kidneys, respond to stress by releasing hormones like cortisol. They regulate your blood pressure and how your heart works.

According to the theory, if you have long-term stress (like the death of a family member or a serious illness), your adrenal glands can’t continuously produce the extra cortisol you need to feel good. So adrenal fatigue sets in.

There’s no approved test for adrenal fatigue. Blood tests can’t detect a small drop in adrenal production.

The suggested treatments for healthy adrenal function are a diet low in sugar, caffeine, and junk food, and “targeted nutritional supplementation” that includes vitamins and minerals:

• Vitamins B5, B6, and B12

Vitamin C

Magnesium

Probiotics and a variety of herbal supplements are also recommended to help your body make more cortisol.

Is It a Myth?

There’s no science to back it up. The Endocrine Society, the world’s largest organization of endocrinologists (people who research and treat patients with diseases related to glands and hormones), flatly says that adrenal fatigue is not a real disease. And it says the symptoms of adrenal fatigue are so general, they can apply to many diseases or conditions (depression, sleep apnea, fibromyalgia) or stem from everyday life.

And the society says some of the treatments can be dangerous. Improving your diet will probably make you feel better, no matter what ailment you have, but taking supplements to help your body produce extra cortisol if you don’t need them may cause your adrenal glands to stop working, it warns

What Else Could It Be?

Symptoms such as being tired, lacking energy, and sleeping all day long could be signs of depression, sleep apnea, fibromyalgia, or a condition called adrenal insufficiency.

What Is Adrenal Insufficiency?

Unlike adrenal fatigue, this is a recognized disease that can be diagnosed. There are two forms of this condition, and both are caused by damage or problems with your adrenal glands that result in them not making enough of the hormone cortisol.

Symptoms of both forms include chronic fatigue, loss of appetite, muscle weakness, weight loss, and stomach pain. You might also have nausea, vomiting, low blood pressure, diarrhea, depression, or darkening of the skin.

Adrenal insufficiency is diagnosed with a blood test that checks to see if your cortisol levels are too low. If you have it, you’ll need to take a hormone replacement.

This taken from Web MD

Hmmmm so I personally don’t agree with all of that.

*Let’s read what a Naturopath says*

Adrenal Fatigue Explained

By Catherine Clinton, ND, Clinic of Natural Medicine

Questions about fatigue are some of the most common that naturopathic physicians hear from patients. We all become run-down now and then due to the stresses of everyday life and the demands of our busy schedules. Over extended periods this can overburden our bodies, creating a situation that’s not so easy to bounce back from. In particular the adrenal glands, being in charge of the release of various stress hormones, can become exhausted and unable to effectively do their job. This is referred to as “adrenal fatigue.” When this happens our fatigue can become chronic and be joined by other symptoms such as pain and inflammation.

The adrenal glands have many functions, including the secretion of cortisol and other hormones in response to stress. Stress can come from an emotional trigger like a fight with a loved one, trouble at work or a physical trigger like an injury or motor vehicle accident. When prompted by pain or inflammation cortisol is released from the adrenal glands into the blood. Cortisol modifies the inflammatory pathways resulting in a decrease in inflammation and pain. When a drop in blood sugar occurs cortisol is secreted to help balance the levels of sugar in the blood. Cortisol is also released from the adrenal glands in a 24 hour daily rhythm with a burst in the morning to help us awake and a decrease in the evening to help us sleep. When adrenal glands are required to secrete at high levels for extended periods of time due to prolonged stress, pain, or blood sugar imbalances, they can become fatigued or begin to secrete cortisol at lower levels. When this occurs it is common to see an increase in fatigue, pain and/or inflammation.

Naturopathic physicians usually test adrenal function with a salivary cortisol test. From this test naturopaths can effectively diagnose and treat adrenal issues. Some common treatments for the adrenal glands include:

• Rhodiola: This botanical has been extensively researched in Russia for its ability to increase physical stamina and increase the body’s resistance to stress. It is categorized as an adaptogen by Russian researchers due to its observed ability to increase resistance to a variety of chemical, biological, and physical stressors. Naturopathic doctors use it in adrenal fatigue treatments to combat stress and increase energy.

• Ginseng: The three ginsengs; Siberian, American and Asian, are all used to treat adrenal issues. Research shows that they increase energy, stamina, and reduce stress. A recent study in 2003 demonstrated how ginseng can effectively help to maintain healthy blood sugar levels as well.

• Stress management: With adrenal issues stress management is vital to any treatment. Proper sleep, stress reduction techniques such as deep breathing or meditation and exercise can all increase the body’s ability to handle stress.

• Nutrition/Blood sugar regulation: Eating a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes that provides antioxidants and nutrients is essential for adrenal health. The adrenal glands need a good diet rich in B vitamins, vitamin C, zinc and magnesium. Eating quality protein at each meal allows the body to maintain healthy levels of blood sugar without taxing the adrenals. Treating adrenal fatigue must address the diet and nutrition of the patient.

Addressing adrenal issues can have profound effects in patient’s lives. As with any medical treatment you should contact your local naturopathic physician to receive a treatment plan that fits your individual needs.

•Adrenal Fatigue

by Jennifer Abercrombie ND | Mar 11, 2013 | Articles By Our Doctors |

Do you feel exhausted in the morning or all day long, gain weight despite good diet and exercise habits, have difficulty sleeping, can’t get through the day without caffeine, have chronic gastrointestinal infections, retain excess water, have difficulty concentrating, suffer from multiple allergies, feel run down or worn out, have heart palpitations, or experience severe PMS? All of these can be caused by adrenal fatigue.

What are the adrenals?

You have probably heard about the adrenals as they are getting a lot of press lately, and for good reason. The adrenals are a big regulator in the body. They control stress and inflammation; they release hormones that control blood pressure (aldosterone), and DHEA and pregnenolone that convert to cortisol and sex hormones. Our bodies are designed as if we were still living in the era of cavemen. The stress response is designed to be a fight or flight response. Imagine you were just seen by a tiger in the wilderness, your adrenals release a relatively short burst of adrenaline that gives you heightened awareness and prepares your body to start springing if needed. But adrenaline is short lived in the blood so the adrenals then release cortisol to give you the capability to have a longer sustained muscle capacity and mental acuity to evade the tiger. Because the release of adrenaline and cortisol dramatically affect all systems in the body for the goal of saving your life from an acute threat, the body requires a period of rest and relaxation for the stress response to relax and for normal physiology to resume. This system isn’t created for the modern era where we have consistent stressors on a daily basis that do not allow the stress response to relax and recover.

What is “stress”?

Stress is more than just emotional and psychological. It can be physical such as inflammation, environmental toxins, and infections (viral or bacterial). Triggers for creating a stress response results from a poor diet that is high in simple carbohydrates and sugars, low or high blood sugar, lack of sleep, lack of exercise, menopause or andropause, environmental toxins, hormonal birth control, long term steroid use (they suppress the adrenals), street drugs, consistent stimulant use (coffee), hypothyroid state, and genetics. If your parents at conception had depleted adrenals and especially if your mother had adrenal dysfunction while she was carrying you in utero, you may be predisposed to having adrenal issues.

When stress becomes chronic

If any of the stressors become chronic and persist without giving the adrenals and the body a chance to recover, a sustained amount of cortisol is released. Too much cortisol suppresses the immune system. This is a natural defense as you don’t want to be exerting precious energy to fight off a viral infection while you are running away from the tiger.  The side effect is that you are left more susceptible to infection. When the stress stays for weeks to months, cortisol starts to get depleted as your adrenals burn through the nutrients that make cortisol. Too little cortisol from exhaustion, allows the immune system to run unchecked, resulting in increased inflammation. A heightened state of inflammation is implicated in advanced aging, hypertension, irritable bowel disease, high cholesterol, heart disease, depression, chronic disease, any autoimmune disease triggers, progressing cancers, and it creates a rocky transition into menopause.

Basic Treatments

Because everyone is an individual and the factors that create adrenal fatigue are a unique combination for each person, there is no one perfect treatment. Each person is going to require a different treatment plan. With that said, here are some basics:

• A modified GAPS/Paleo/Anti-Inflammatory diet that is specific to you

• Minimize simple carbohydrates, sugar, caffeine, and recreational drugs. Marijuana may relax you, but when used for stress management you don’t learn how to process stress properly and may become dependent on it and use it as a crutch.
• B Vitamins: whole grains, beans, peas, nuts, dark leafy greens
• Vitamin C: Fruits and veggies, especially papaya, cantaloupe, strawberries, bell peppers, broccoli, tomatoes, dark leafy greens
• Magnesium: Dark leafy greens, whole grains, nuts, seeds, legumes
• Zinc: Meats, seafood, poultry, pumpkin and sesame seeds, nuts, whole grains
• Fat: Good fat (including saturated fat) is needed to make cholesterol which makes DHEA, pregnenolone, and cortisol. Good sources are: organic meats, coconut oil, nuts, seeds, organic unsalted butter, avocado, and olive oil
• Water: Stay hydrated with clean, filtered water
• Sleep: A regular, consistent sleep pattern
• Light and exercise: Go outside, feel the sunshine, and to move the body
• Re-assess: Re-evaluate the stress in your life and any negative relationships. Find out how you can make changes to lower stress
• Connect with others: Foster and build strong, supportive relationships in your life
• Don’t over do it: Even when you are starting to feel strong, don’t burn yourself out with too many daily tasks, too much on the social calendar, or over-exercising
• Release: Find a way to release your stress. Examples include meditation, journaling, hiking, surfing, beach combing, walking barefoot in the sand, etc.

What bothers me the most is that MDs think that Naturopathic medicine is new , however most people don’t understand how long it’s been around.

I will write in this in the next few days.

Reference links

http://www.nawellness.com/adrenal-fatigue/

https://www.naturopathic.org/content.asp?contentid=314

https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/adrenal-fatigue-is-it-real

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Eat Healthy, Energy, Hashimoto, Meditation, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain, Plant, RareDisease, SONK, spondylolisthesis, SPONK, Thoughts, Thyroid, Uncategorized, Vegetables, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards, wellness

The Path To Wellness Isn’t Easy

How many tines do you feel like for all your good intentions and healthy changes to behavior , you’d like to feel a bit more happy or healthy or have more well in your #Wellness goal?

Well, you’re not alone.

Why is it that despite all the meditation , eating healthy, exercising as best as you can especially if your suffering from chronic pain or a chronic condition , eating kale making smoothies and protein shakes, you seem to spend most days feeling run-down and uncomfortable?

For me that’s Hashimoto thyroiditis.

Plus my adrenals are fatigued making my already slow thyroid work even harder. It just gets so tiring.

I miss that none stop energy I had. I was able to work 8-10 hr days come home get dinner , clean our pool with my husband, have a small patio garden, clean the house , shop etc…..

Now I am exhausted after I do some errands and ride my recumbent bike for 15-20 min.

Again I’m told it’s the Hashimoto

I get sick of mixed messages one Dr. says one thing and the other says another.

I have been told I don’t eat enough. I have been told I eat to much

Drink more water – yes this one is true and I’m working on it.

Eat this

Don’t eat this

High carb

Low carb

Eat your greens , don’t eat your greens

I just get so sick of it .

I know how to eat healthy, I never really ate horrible. I gained weight first after my mom died. Because food soothed me at the time. I was grieving. I knew I wasn’t eating how I should back then.

After working through that and trying to exercise nothing.

Still tired , still carrying a few extra pounds

I tried Atkins and it was just for me more meat than I cared to eat.

I tried a few other things and same ok same ol.

A few year ago I bought some dvds and worked hard and I mean hard.

So hard I tore my meniscus leading to osteonecrosis in the knee that already was a pain in the ass by having osteoarthritis.

And I won’t mention how bad spondylolisthesis pain is.

I have always been a veggie lover. And I prefer veggies.

You’d think switching to plant based would have blasted any fat off me sine it’s been a year plus.

Nope I lose 5 here 10 there then gain 2 back. Over and over.

Again I’m told it’s my Hashimoto

I’ve had hypothyroidism for 20 years and the levothyroxine always made me feel like crap.

No one ever listened when I told them this. I remember telling my Dr. I feel like my body is fighting against me. Most of just looked at me.

Here I was right my body was attacking me.

That’s Hashimoto – I found this out maybe a month ago.

Finally I feel vindicated !!

Even before I went to plant based I didn’t eat horrible.

Sure 1 night or 2 was fast food but not the golden arch kind. Fast food to me meant I was not cooking. I would buy baked fish or on occasion a good spaghetti dinner.

It was going to decent restaurants ordering dinner.

Yes I know they have a shit load of salt in them. But that can’t be the only thing keeping this damn weight on.

Maybe someday these restaurants will get with it and cut their salt by at least half.

And then there’s adrenal fatigue

So what is Adrenal fatigue?

Adrenal fatigue is a potential result of not eating enough and or not eating enough of the “right” foods and the hormone imbalances that creates. While many people don’t fully understand it, the theory is simple it will make you feel tired.

I learned all this from my Naturopath and the Registered Dietician I see.

‘Adrenal fatigue is also a big topic  which comes from calorie restriction for too long throughout the year.

‘Calorie restriction is fine for short periods of time but unfortunately people are looking for body fat loss 12 months a year and the body hates that. Your body is smart and will adapt, so goals become very hard to reach in that state.’

Now What is Hashimoto?

Hashimoto is a condition that arises when the immune system attacks – and damages – the thyroid gland.

Over time, the thyroid gland, which straddles your windpipe at the front your neck, becomes unable to produce enough thyroid hormone so it becomes under-active.

As one of the primary functions of thyroid hormone is to keep your cells – and you – active, if you have insufficient amounts of the stuff, your body will slow down.

Say hello to tiredness and tighter fitting clothing.

“Hypothyroidism is a slow burner and it very easily can go undetected, and often misdiagnosed as depression.

Hashimoto cannot be cured but, symptoms can be managed with medications, designed to rebalance the levels of thyroid hormone in the body.

Did you know 75% of people with Hashimoto are lactose intolerant? some people also find that avoiding gluten can help.

Well I meditate to help manage stress , I cut out daily and I am working on the gluten free area. Some days are harder than others.

A few ways I’m learning to alleviate Hashimoto symptoms through diet.

1. Support the thyroid -This means stripping your diet back to basics – Reduce your consumption of caffeine, sugar, alcohol and refined carbohydrates, which are common triggers for thyroid problems.

2. Avoid Soy

Steer clear of soy products such as soy sauce, tamari and miso,” even the fermented, organic and non-GMO types. “They can impact your cell receptors and disrupt feedback through your hormone system.

3. Eat greens in moderation

It might sound counter-intuitive but, when it comes to thyroid problems, these act as goitrogens this means they interfere with the uptake of iodine by the thyroid gland and, therefore, the production of thyroid hormones.

“I’m a big fan of green veggies so don’t feel like I can never have them,

I enjoy vegetables in the brassica family (broccoli, cauliflower, some kale and Brussels sprouts) cooked well rather than raw, as heat inactivates the goitrogenic compounds.

Other foods to watch out for? Soybeans, millet, strawberries, peanuts, turnips and watercress.Everything I love.

4.Time to love my Adrenals

High cortisol (which is pumped from the adrenals) is directly linked to lower thyroid function so managing stress levels is essential.

5. I take a probiotic every day.

6. I am a flexitarian so I will eat meat or fish 1x a week.

So I have learned meditation, qigong, I love walks in nature and time switched off from social media. People actually get pissed off at me when I don’t respond right away!! I mean really ?! I also practice deep-belly breathing every day.

I am still tired just not totally exhausted.

I just want to feel better get this weight off because that will help my bone conditions also.

I hate feeling like this. I’m sick of feeling so tired.

I’m a happy person who likes to stay busy.

I shouldn’t feel so tired by 3pm

I get frustrated because I am sick of carrying this extra weight around.

My Naturopath feels I’m biking to hard. And suggested I slow the pace down and go longer.

So I bike longer slower , I like it better. I’m not as tired afterwards.

So tweaking more things.

I hope someday I find that sweet spot that revs up my thyroid helps the adrenals and I can feel great and get this fat off my ass once and for all.

I will continue to eat mostly plant based. The other benefit it has is it’s helped my bone pain . I still get it just not 24/7

I do love to meditate and I also enjoy qigong.

One day at a time is all we can do.

Well here’s to wellness!!

Have a great day.

Deb Andio

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Energy, exercise, Factor V Leiden, Food Is Thy Medicine, Heart Disease, Hypothyroidism, Inflammation, Life, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Positivity, SONK, StopTheClot, Thoughts, Uncategorized, Vision, Weather, WegoHealth, Winter, Women

1 year ago I decided to take my health back

Happy Anniversary To My Health….

I was always pretty healthy ….until I wasn’t.

I gained weight , injured my knee gained more weight was diagnosed with one thing after another and it was really exhausting.

First osteoarthritis and hypothyroidism at age 45

They torn meniscus age 51

Then thanks to the meniscus tear Osteonecrosis set in my knee….

Then she 53 diagnosed officially with spondylolisthesis and a bilateral pars fracture

I had the spondylolisthesis before but my former PCP never told me I had it. But I seen it on an old Mri.

The pain every where was exhausting and some days it still is.

But I decided the heck with all these doctors and I decided to eat mostly plant based but I do still eat chicken fish or turkey now and then and rarely beef.

I ride my recumbent bike 2x a day and I walk when I can. And some days even when I should rest I go walk anyway.

Today’s pictures and videos are from my morning walk : and it’s also one year ago I quit smoking……so it’s a great day !

Pain or no pain I’m not going to just sit around.

Sitting is death

Moving is life

And ya know after I’m done I feel so much better.

1 year since I’ve quit smoking after being a smoker for 40 years. My lungs are feel better my walking speed has improved my distance has improved

1 year since I started eating a healthy mostly plant based but I’m not a vegan and it’s good clean healthy real colorful food . I am using food as medicine in a way to fight pain and inflammation . Now sure I eat a cookie or 2 now and then just not every day. And all my other choices are good so I don’t deprive myself of a treat now and then.

And for having Osteonecrosis,Osteoarthritis, Spondylolisthesis with a bilateral pats fracture in my L5 S1 I feel pretty darn good today even in this cold weather.

Just need to drop some weight one step and one day at a time.

I have taken my life back and no one is going to stop me !

Tomorrow I may be in pain and that’s ok. I can accept that but as long as I know I am doing all I can to combat my pain and keep my body moving and providing it with the best nutrients possible(most of the time)

It’s a win win for me ,one day at a time !

Keep your meds , keep your cigarettes keep your junk fast food.

Body Heal Thy Self

Posted in Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Eat Healthy, Endocrinologist, Hypothyroidism, Thyroid

Hypothyroidism The Rollercoaster.

Greetings

Those of us who have hypothyroidism know, this journey we call Thyroid Disease is an absolute roller coaster ride and you sometimes wonder when you will be able to get off this ride.

I’ve Seen 3 Specialists

Believe it or not, my original diagnosis of Hypothyroidism did not come from an endocrinologist, but from my primary care physician. He also was the one who had originally put me on Synthroid. It wasn’t until a few months later, when I wasn’t feeling any better, that my PCP finally recommended I see a specialist.

Well I saw an endocrinologist several years ago and was told TSH was fine. Boy I’d like to see him right now.

This Endocrinologist Spent Maybe 10 Minutes With Me

It actually took longer to fill out the new patient paperwork. He didn’t ask me any questions did not ask me a single question, and interrupted me down every time I went to ask a question .

After taking my blood, he told me I should lose weight I thought what the hell! I was 5’2 and then weighed maybe 128lbs with my clothes on.

That was it. I felt like paid someone to be rude to me for no reason. I could have stayed home and been verbally insulted by my first husband. He also called me a fat ass.

I told my PCP I wasn’t going back to that endocrinologist.

So I just kept taking the synthroid given by my PCP and I never felt right on it. I was told it takes time and adjustments.

Well fast forward now 10 years later . My new PCP Dr is a female as my old Dr just wasn’t cutting it any longer.

Seems like they get to many patients and just stop listening.

So my new PCP prescribes synthroid and I only take it every other day. What’s odd is I feel good when I’m not taking it.

But I try to comply

Still feeling like crap.

Now my insurance will only pay for levothyroxine, the generic version.

Wow I became mad all the time, anxious,very little sleep.

I asked my PCP for something else as I did research and wanted to try armor.

She doesn’t give armor.

So I see a new endocrinologist and I made sure I asked before never making the appointment do they prescribe armor? Yes they do.

So I take my blood work in meet a woman PA and then the Dr. I told them why I wanted armor and off all levothyroxine was told no problem.

I was given a rx for tirosint.

To my surprise it also is a levothyroxine drug.

And from 18.00 the co pay is 125.00

So I said the hell with that.

I stopped all thyroid medication and weekly called my endocrinologist to see when the armor was going to be called in as I am taking no thyroid meds at all.

This went on for 5 weeks. By now I’m exhausted, weak, feeling depressed, my face is puffy , I’m lethargic,and sleeping a lot plus my hair is dryer, skin dryer etc…

I finally demand to talk to the doctor and ask him if this is how all new patients are treated?

He apologized

Looked up the information

Apparently they called it in to a pharmacy I don’t go to and no one ever told me about it.

They barely made a note in my electronic chart.

Finally, Someone Who Listened To Me

And called it in to the right pharmacy and this is where this story will pick up.

I started the armor

September 13,2017 I am on 15 mcg and started out low. So as to now shock my body.

And I feel slightly better already. Not as anxious , I can sleep at night, my heart isn’t feeling like it’s going to jump out of my chest. I have more energy. The fog is lifting.

So I’m hoping this will be a good ride.

Time will tell.

But so far so good.

Know the symptoms

Common Symptoms of Hypothyroidism

Below are major symptoms associated with hypothyroidism.

• Fatigue

• Weakness

• Weight gain or difficulty losing weight (despite reduced food intake)

• Coarse, dry hair and dry skin

• Hair loss

• Sensitivity to cold

• Muscle cramps and aches

• Constipation

• Depression

• Irritability

• Memory loss

• Abnormal menstrual cycles

• Decreased libido

• Slowed speech (severe cases)

• Jaundice (severe cases)

• Increase in tongue size (severe cases)

You don’t have to encounter every one of these symptoms to be diagnosed with hypothyroidism. Every patient’s experience with the disorder is different. While you may notice that your skin and hair have become dry and rough, another patient may be plagued more by fatigue and depression.

The thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level reflects the severity of the hypothyroidism. For example, if you have a mild form of hypothyroidism and a relatively lower TSH level, you may not notice—or even have—symptoms. That’s because your hormone levels haven’t decreased to the point where they have a major impact on your metabolism. The more hypothyroid you become, the more symptomatic you’ll be.

The symptoms of hypothyroidism aren’t always noticeable, but it’s important that you understand what to look out for. Recognizing hypothyroidism early on will allow you to manage the disorder and prevent it from interfering with your life.

ChronicallyGratefulDebla