Posted in Arthritis, Chronic Pain, Pain

Not All Pain is Created Equal

Not All Pain is Created Equal

When we hear the word arthritis, we think of our grandparents talking about their joint aches. We had no idea it could happen to children and people of all ages.

There are more than 100 types of arthritis and related diseases, and not all arthritis pain is alike. It can originate in different areas of our body, triggering chemical and electrical signals that move from the area of pain or injury up to brain and back to let us know that hurt

I have a high tolerance for pain so when I am hurting, I know it’s bad. Everyone’s threshold and tolerance for pain is unique. Then, there are days I bump my hand or arm and I see stars. I just don’t understand it….

Living and coping with chronic pain can be the hardest part of living with a joint disease. It can disrupt every part of our life and many parts of your life can also affect your pain.

Facts on Pain

  • As many as 75 percent of those 65 and older report persistent pain from arthritis and other chronic conditions.
  • Almost four out of five older adults have multiple chronic conditions besides arthritis, like diabetes, heart disease and obesity. And the combination can heighten pain and discomfort.
  • Women are more likely to develop chronic pain and often feel pain more intensely than men.
  • In the United States, 23% of all adults—over 54 million people—have arthritis. About 24 million adults are limited in their activities from arthritis, and more than 1 in 4 adults with arthritis report severe joint pain

National Prevalence

  • From 2013–2015, an estimated 54.4 million US adults (22.7%) annually had ever been told by a doctor that they had some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia. Learn more about national arthritis statistics.
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Throughout September, I want to help bring attention to living with chronic pain and the suffering arthritis frequently causes. Let your family and friends know it’s Pain Awareness Month and ask them to help spread the word about how important it is to find more effective treatments and a cure for all forms of joint pain and arthritis.

Most of all, make sure you take care of yourself.

Tips on taking care of yourself and living with arthritis

References

Managing a flare – Arthritis Foundation- https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/managing-pain/pain-relief-solutions/tips-for-managing-an-arthritis-flare

Exercise and kids with JA – https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/physical-activity/getting-started/best-exercises-for-children-with-ja

Arthritis , Autoimmune and Rheumatology Research Cure Arthritis https://curearthritis.org/arthritis-research

Posted in Awareness

Dealing with Joint Pain in the Pandemic

How do I deal with my knee and back pain until the orthopedic doctors start seeing patients again?

There are a variety of non-operative treatment options for pain. No one treatment is going to help everyone, and patients need to find the treatments that seem to work the best for them.

Medications I personally cannot take NSAIDS so I reach for

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is an over-the-counter option that is safe and effective for me.

For many Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) – e.g. Ibuprofen and naproxen – may also be helpful. Prescription NSAIDs are also an option to discuss with your health care provider.

Some say medical marijuana helps them. I’ve never tried it so I cannot comment.

Supplements, such as glucosamine/chondroitin, are generally safe and may be helpful in reducing some arthritic pain. Also talk to you doctor about curcumin supplements tablets .

I drink Turmeric tea aka golden milk it is a natural anti-inflammatory agent.

Exercise helps me. I’m not talking about running or walking a marathon.

Just 1-2 miles once or twice a day. Makes me feel good especially in summer. My joints love the heat.

I have a daily exercise regimen, specifically designed for me and my knee osteonecrosis osteoarthritis, and this back pain that is really an out of the blue pain.

With osteonecrosis moving is critically important for maintaining strength in muscles supporting the joints , reducing pain and it’s also great for stress.

It is important to be as active as your joints allow and find a variety of stretching and strengthening exercises that you perform daily, without increasing your pain.

A good source for exercise instruction for arthritis may be found at you ortho office maybe they can email you some ideas.

Crutches, a walker, ice/heat treatments and a knee brace may also be helpful in managing your hip and/or knee pain.

Weight Loss and Diet

The covid 19 is a little saying that explains what is happened to many since the pandemic.

And extra 19 pounds can cause the joints to really hurt.

Many patients with osteonecrosis and arthritis are carrying a few extra pounds and weight loss reduces stress across our joints.

We put 3-5X our body weight across our hip and knee joints with activity, particularly stair climbing and getting in and out of a chair. Every 10 pounds of extra weight carried results in 50 pounds of weight bearing pressure across the hips and knees!

A healthy diet is important for general health and weight loss, and some may find benefit from focusing on an “anti-inflammatory” diet. The anti-inflammatory diet is a diet which includes tomatoes, olive oil, green leafy vegetables, nuts, fatty fish, and fresh fruit, particularly blueberries, strawberries, cherries and oranges. Foods thought to cause inflammation, and to avoid, include white bread and pastries, French fries, soda, margarine and red meat.

In summary: stay active, eat healthy, maintain social distancing as instructed and maintain a positive attitude.

Please know that your orthopedic provider and all pcp ‘s are also anxious to get back to “business as usual” and help you to resolve your arthritic pain!

Check out my other posts on great recipes

Please follow like and share to get updates on my latest posts

Wishing you love, good health and a pain free day

Love

Deb

https://flexitarianforlife.wordpress.com/

http://www.ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com

Posted in Chronic Pain, Inflammation, Pain

Cabbage -Don’t Overlook This Inflammation Fighting Veggie

1. Lowers the Signs of Aging

Cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables contain a high amount of Vitamin C and E, which help in the production of collagen, the compound which keeps the skin elastic and wrinkle-free. Vitamin A along with Vitamin D protects the skin and gives you a youthful skin.

  1. Helps Fight Free Radicals

Cabbage is rich in antioxidants Antioxidants help fight oxidative damage caused by free radicals and prevent a whole range of ailments.

  1. Speeds Up the Recovery Process

Cabbage leaves are used as a poultice. Using these leaves can ease skin eruptions caused by acne, psoriasis, eczema, ulcers, wounds,insect bites and rashes. Grated leaves or blended leaves can be applied directly over the affected area with some dressing for faster healing.

  1. Improves Complexion

Cabbage can also help acne and other skin conditions. Some steamed cabbage leaves compressed in a cotton cloth can be placed on the affected area overnight for best results. The levels of potassium and Vitamin A also improve complexion.

  1. May Provide Relief From Allergies

Cabbages and other cruciferous vegetables of its kind contain anti-inflammatory properties. They are rich in sulforaphane and glutamine which are powerful anti-inflammatory agents. Regular consumption can ease health conditions worsened by inflammation such as allergies, irritation, fever, joint pain and skin disorders.

  1. May Prevent Cancer

The Brassica vegetables such as cabbage contain a significant amount of glucosinolates that have strong anti-cancer properties. These compounds scavenge free radicals which are bad for health and contribute to cancers of different kinds. Red cabbages are particularly loaded with compounds such as sinigrin, lupeol and sulforaphane with anti-cancer properties.

  1. Good for the Digestive Tract

Cabbage is high in fiber, which makes it healthy for the digestive tract. Eating cabbage can provide relief from constipation. This is very effective in treating constipation and related gastrointestinal disorders.

  1. Promotes Weight Loss

As cabbage is loaded with essential nutrients and contains almost no calories or fats, hence it is perfect for people who are on a weight loss diet. If you don’t like to eat cabbage in the form of vegetable, you can drink cabbage juice.

  1. Protects the Eye

Vitamin A which is an essential nutrient for our eyes is present in cabbage and helps maintain good vision. The beta-carotene, an antioxidant present in cabbage is also helpful in preventing macular degeneration and delay the onset of cataracts.

  1. Improves the Health of Hair

Cabbage being rich in many of the essential nutrients helps maintain healthy hair and prevents hair fall. It also prevents dry hair and protects the hair strands from physical damage. Vitamin C which is found in cabbage is essential for the production of the protein keratin which primarily makes up the hair and nails in the body.

  1. Improves the Health of the Heart

Red cabbages are rich in compounds called anthocyanins which give them their characteristic purple color. Studieshave shown a link between diet consisting of foods rich in these compounds and lowering of heart disease. Along with this, cabbages are also good sources of potassium and calcium essential for healthy functioning of the heart.

  1. Good for the Brain

Cabbage is also brain food. Vitamin K and anthocyanins in cabbage promote mental function and focus. Vitamin K is also important to protect the nerve cells from damage and prevent degenerative diseases. Cabbage is also a rich source of iodine which is an essential nutrient for the brain.

  1. Helps Strengthen the Bones

Cabbages are abundant sources of nutrients that are necessary for building strong bones. They are loaded with calcium, magnesium, and potassium which are all essential for strengthening the bones. Eating cabbage may also help in warding off diseases such as osteoporosis.

  1. Regulates Blood Pressure

Red cabbage is an abundant source of anthocyanins which is known to lower blood pressure. Eating cabbage regularly helps maintain normal blood pressure and decreases the risk of heart diseases.

  1. Good for Diabetic Patients

The potassium present in cabbage is not only good for lowering blood pressure but helps maintain blood sugar levels. It also improves mental well being by reducing stress and anxiety.

16. Boosts Immunity

Being loaded with Vitamin C and antioxidants, cabbage helps boost immunity. It supports the immune system and fights off various diseases.

17. Helps Treat Peptic Ulcer

The presence of anti-inflammation compounds such as glucosinolates helps reduce peptic ulcers in the stomach. Cabbage juice is a remedy for ulcers. It eases the inflammation in the stomach lining and speeds up the recovery process.

 

Tips to Select and Store Cabbage

To get the most out of cabbage, you must first choose the best ones from the market. Here’s how to pick good cabbages:

  • Cabbages are available all year round in supermarkets. Look for ones that are large, dense, and firm. They should have colorful leaves that are crisp and shiny without bruises, blemishes, or insect bites. They must also feel heavy for their size.
  • Tightly packed leaves at the bottom of the cabbage indicate freshness. If they are starting to separate from its stem, the cabbage is old. Don’t buy it if it seems old.
  • Shredded cabbage or which is already cut in half should be avoided as they would have lost their Vitamin C content.
  • To retain their freshness and Vitamin C level, it’s essential to keep them cold in a refrigerator.
  • Cabbages that are stored in plastic bags in a refrigerator can be stored for a week or two.
  • Cabbages with loose leaves will not last too long and are best stored in a cool dark place.
  • In case you need half a cabbage, the other half should be wrapped in a plastic bag with some water sprinkled on the cut side and refrigerated.
  • Another way to store cabbage effectively is to freeze it. First, shred the cabbage and blanch the shreds for two minutes. Filter out and freeze the shreds in an airtight container.

How to Cook Cabbage

You can include cabbage in soups, salads, and casseroles. It can be boiled, fried, stuffed, steamed or even eaten raw. Here are some healthy ways to cook cabbages:

  • A simple cabbage dish can be made by boiling some water and adding chopped cabbage to it. Add sugar and sprinkle some meat seasoning and simmer for 35 minutes.
  • Grated cabbage can be cooked in milk for 3 to 4 minutes and seasoned with pepper and salt.
  • A low-calorie cabbage dish involves cooking cabbage leaves in a mixture of mustard and cucumber juice. Steamed cabbage and other vegetables can be diced and added to it. Cook until the cabbage is a little crispy.
  • Shred red cabbage into fine pieces and add sliced apples and a bit of vinegar. Cook for 1 minute.
  • To make stuffed cabbage rolls, remove the core and stuff it with vegetables of your choice. Cook for 3 minutes until it is soft and serve with a spicy sauce.
  • For a quick and delicious dish, stir-fry sliced cabbage with ginger, garlic, chillies and a bit of soy sauce.

Are There Any Side Effects of Eating Cabbage?

Cabbages also have a few side effects like any other vegetable, some of them include:

  • Foodborne illnesses
  • Bloating
  • Goitre
  • Flatulence
  • Colic in babies

FAQs

  1. What Are the Different Varieties of Cabbage?

There are 7 varieties of cabbage – red cabbage, Choy sum, Bok choy, Savoy cabbage, Napa cabbage, Cannonball cabbage, January king cabbage.

 

2. Apply to sore joints.

You can place a leaf of cabbage on a sore joint and it will help pull out the inflammation, I have done this and felt the benefits.

 

**If Pregnant talk to your doctor about eating cabbage too often**

 

The information is provided on this website is for entertainment and general information purposes only.

While I aim to provide up-to-date information, I make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose.

You are reading of the information on this website is of your own free will and you are taking the provided information at your own risk.

The information we provide is for entertainment purposes only. I am  not providing medical, legal or other professional advice.  And will not be liable for anything you choose to do on your own. In fact I always suggest you talk to your own doctor before trying anything.

Posted in Awareness

All About Our Knees Part 2

Types of Pain

What are the different types of knee pain?

Knee pain has many causes. Some of the most common include:

Osteoarthritis

Arthritis is a chronic condition that causes joint inflammation. Symptoms include redness, warmth, swelling, tenderness and pain. Up to 30 percent of the population may have knee osteoarthritis, or “wear and tear” arthritis. This is the gradual breakdown of the cartilage in the knee. Also called degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis usually develops over years and often is found in patients who have had a knee infection or injury and those who are overweight.

As cartilage wears away, the bones around it can grow thicker and develop bony spurs. This can lead to increased friction between the bones and disrupted movement in your knee. This also can lead to problems with the synovium, a membrane in your knee that produces a liquid to keep your cartilage slippery. This membrane can become inflamed and make too much fluid. This results in swelling, or “water on the knee.” In the most severe cases, the knee can become deformed as the continued friction wears away the bone.

Common symptoms of osteoarthritis include pain, stiffness, tenderness, a limited range of motion and a grating sensation when you bend your knee. The pain is usually worse after activity.

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis can affect joints on both sides of the body (both knees, both hands and/or both wrists). In rheumatoid arthritis, your body’s cells attack your own tissues. While in most people symptoms develop gradually over years, they can appear rapidly. Rheumatoid arthritis affects three to five times more women than men and often presents between the ages of 20 and 50.

Rheumatoid arthritis may be related to a combination of abnormal immunity and genetic, environmental and hormonal factors. Over time, rheumatoid arthritis can cause cartilage to wear away, swelling in the synovium, and excess fluid in the knee. In later stages, bones can rub against each other.

Bursitis

Bursitis is the inflammation of any of the fluid-filled sacs (bursae) protecting the body’s joints. This is usually caused by repetitive motions or by a stress such as kneeling. Sometimes, a sudden injury can cause bursitis.

Tendonitis

The tendons – rope-like tissues connecting muscles to bone at the knee and other joints – can become painfully inflamed by repetitive and strenuous movement. Tendonitis is a common sports injury, caused by overuse of the same parts of the body. Patellar tendinitis, or “jumper’s knee,” is an inflammation or irritation of the tendon between the knee cap and the shin bone.

Baker’s cyst

A lump behind your knee could be a Baker’s cyst. A Baker’s cyst, also called a popliteal cyst, is a fluid-filled pocket that causes swelling and tightness behind the knee. Often, it is not painful. A Baker’s cyst is typically associated with arthritis or a cartilage tear, conditions that can cause your knee to produce too much fluid. The key to treatment is to find the underlying cause of the fluid accumulating in the Baker’s cyst.

Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS)

Knee pain or discomfort while walking up and down stairs, jumping or squatting may be symptoms of patellofemoral pain syndrome. This common knee problem is felt toward the front of the knee. It can cause a grinding sensation when bending or straightening your leg, and can cause your knee to occasionally buckle. Sometimes called “runner’s knee,” patellofemoral pain syndrome may be caused by a kneecap that is not aligned properly, overuse, injury, excess weight or when the cartilage in the knee cap is worn significantly.

Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis

Osteonecrosis of the knee (also known as avascular necrosis) is a painful condition that occurs when the blood supply to a section of bone in the femur (thighbone) or tibia (shinbone) is disrupted. The pain varies from no pain to severe hot pain. Like bathe feeling of being hit in knee with a hot iron or sharp stabbing lightening bolt pain. Treatment can vary depending on stage from Prp injections to Total Knee Replacement.

SPONK Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the knee comes on suddenly.

Posted in Awareness

All About Our Knees Part 1 of a 6 part series.

About the knee 1 of 6

Did you know that your knee is the largest joint in your body. Its a really amazing and complex mechanism made of bone, cartilage and ligaments. The cartilage in your knee acts as a cushion and gliding surface. So the knee can move freely.

When the knee is healthy, the cartilage keeps the bones in the joint from rubbing together. However, when the joint is affected by arthritis, the bones make contact and cause mild or severe pain.

Injuries, as well as aging and degenerative conditions such as arthritis, osteoarthritis can cause the cartilage to break down.

Things like osteonecrosis of the knee (also known as avascular necrosis) is a painful condition that occurs when the blood supply to a section of bone in the femur (thighbone) or tibia (shinbone) is disrupted. And eventually can lead to severe osteoarthritis and even joint collapse.

Knee pain can affect every step you take. From playing sports to climbing steps, knee pain is difficult to ignore.

Some home remedies may help temporarily, but if you have chronic pain or symptoms such as swollen or red joints, it’s time to see a doctor.

I am not a fan of steroid injections or corticosteroids period as they can lead to Osteonecrosis.

And in my opinion doctors use these way too much for me. It seems like the go to drug for everything.

Because it helps inflammation but When prescribed in doses that exceed your body’s usual levels, corticosteroids suppress inflammation. This can reduce the signs and symptoms of inflammatory conditions, such as arthritis and asthma.

But they also have side effects like

What side effects can corticosteroids cause?

  • Elevated pressure in the eyes (glaucoma)
  • Fluid retention, causing swelling in your lower legs.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Problems with mood swings, memory and behavior and other psychological effects, such as confusion or delirium. Just to name a few.
Posted in Awareness

Arthritis Pain Do’s and Don’ts

Arthritis pain:

The Do’s and The don’ts

Will physical activity reduce or increase your arthritis pain? Get tips on exercise and other common concerns when coping with arthritis symptoms and arthritis pain.

Arthritis is a leading cause of pain and disability worldwide. You can find plenty of advice about easing the pain of arthritis and other conditions with exercise, medication and stress reduction. How do you know what will work for you?

Here are some do’s and don’ts to help you figure it out

Basics

Whatever your condition, it will be easier to stay ahead of your pain if you:

• Learn all you can about your condition, including what type of arthritis you have and whether any of your joints are already damaged

• Enlist your doctor, friends and family in managing your pain

• Tell your doctor if your pain changes

Everyday routines

Pay attention to your joints, whether sitting, standing or engaging in activity. When we have pain the last thing we want to do is move but often what we should be doing.

• Keep your joints moving. Do daily, gentle stretches that move your joints through their full range of motion.

• Use good posture. A physical therapist can show you how to sit, stand and move correctly.

• Know your limits. Balance activity and rest, and don’t overdo it.

In addition, lifestyle changes are important for easing pain.

• Manage weight. Being overweight can increase complications of arthritis and contribute to more arthritis pain. Making incremental, permanent lifestyle changes resulting in gradual weight loss is often the most effective method of weight management.

• Quit smoking. If you smoke stop. It’s not that hard , I quit smoking and so can you. Smoking causes stress on connective tissues, which can increase arthritis pain.Smoking also slows down the healing process as well as it’s a nasty stinky habit.

Exercise

When you have arthritis, movement can decrease your pain and stiffness, improve your range of motion, strengthen your muscles, and increase your endurance.

What to do

Choose the right kinds of activities those that build the muscles around your joints but don’t damage the joints themselves. A physical or occupational therapist can help you develop an exercise program that’s right for you.

Don’t just go start jogging if you have knee problems or lifting weights if you have back and joint issues.

Always consult your doctor before doing anything!!

Once you get the ok.

Focus on stretching, range-of-motion exercises and gradual progressive strength training. Include low-impact aerobic exercise, such as walking, cycling or water exercises, to improve your mood and help control your weight.

What to avoid

Avoid activities that involve high impact and repetitive motion, such as:

• Running

• Jumping

• Tennis

• High-impact aerobics

• Repeating the same movement, such as a tennis serve, again and again

Medications

Many types of medications are available for arthritis pain relief. Most are relatively safe, but no medication is completely free of side effects. Talk with your doctor to formulate a medication plan for your specific pain symptoms.

What to do

Over-the-counter pain medications, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen sodium (Aleve) can help relieve occasional pain triggered by activity your muscles and joints aren’t used to — such as gardening after a winter indoors. But not everyone can take certain medications again talk to your doctor.

Cream containing capsaicin may be applied to skin over a painful joint to relieve pain, do not use if you have a scratch, cut or open wound. Use alone or with oral medication.

Consult your doctor if over-the-counter medications don’t relieve your pain.

What to avoid

• Overtreatment. Talk with your doctor if you find yourself using over-the-counter pain relievers regularly.

• Undertreatment. Don’t try to ignore severe and prolonged arthritis pain. You might have joint inflammation or damage requiring daily medication.

• Focusing only on pain. Depression is more common in people with arthritis. Doctors have found that treating depression with antidepressants and other therapies reduces not only depression symptoms but also arthritis pain.

Physical and emotional integration

It’s no surprise that arthritis pain has a negative effect on your mood. If everyday activities make you hurt, you’re bound to feel discouraged. But when these normal feelings escalate to create a constant refrain of fearful, hopeless thoughts, your pain can actually get worse and harder to manage.

What to do

Therapies that interrupt destructive mind-body interactions include:

• Cognitive behavioral therapy. This well-studied, effective combination of talk therapy and behavior modification helps you identify — and break — cycles of self-defeating thoughts and actions.

• Relaxation therapy. Meditating, doing yoga, deep breathing, listening to music, being in nature, writing in a journal do whatever helps you relax. There’s no downside to relaxation, and it can help ease pain.

• Acupuncture. Some people get pain relief through acupuncture treatments, when a trained acupuncturist inserts hair-thin needles at specific points on your body. It can take several weeks before you notice improvement.

• Heat and cold. Use of heat, such as applying heating pads to aching joints, taking hot baths or showers, or immersing painful joints in warm paraffin wax, can help relieve pain temporarily. Be careful not to burn yourself. Use heating pads for no more than 20 minutes at a time.
Use of cold, such as applying ice packs to sore muscles, can relieve pain and inflammation after strenuous exercise.

• Massage. Massage might improve pain and stiffness temporarily. Make sure your massage therapist knows where your arthritis affects you.

What to avoid

• Smoking. If you’re addicted to tobacco, you might use it as an emotional coping tool. But it’s counterproductive: Toxins in smoke cause stress on connective tissue, leading to more joint problems.

• A negative attitude. Negative thoughts are self-perpetuating. As long as you dwell on them, they escalate, which can increase your pain and risk of disability. Instead, distract yourself with activities you enjoy, spend time with people who support you and consider talking to a therapist.

Wishing you a pain free day

Deb

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Hearing Loss, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Link-Between Hearing Loss and RA

When we think of hearing loss, you may associate it with your loved one who’s always asking you to repeat yourself, or the friend who may struggle to follow conversations.

Hearing loss is often caused by exposure to excessive noise and is even linked to the natural aging process. But did you know that hearing loss isn’t just caused by your loud job, or the blaring music at the concert ?

Along with lesser known causes of hearing loss like smoking and diabetes, a recent study found a link between hearing loss and rheumatoid arthritis.

 

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease that affects many seniors, though young people can also suffer from the disease. Around 1.5 million Americans have RA, and this number continues to rise. RA is an autoimmune disease, which means that the immune system turns against the body. Rather than protecting the body from sicknesses by warding off viral and bacterial infections, the immune system attacks the joints, causing swelling, inflammation, and pain. RA can damage cartilage and tissue around the joints, disform the joints, and even damage the bone. It becomes painful to move the affected joints, and leads to reduced mobility, and difficulty performing normal daily tasks.

Linking Hearing Loss and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Clinical trials looking at the links between hearing loss and arthritis found far higher rates of hearing loss among those with arthritis. Those with RA were more likely to have sensorineural hearing loss, hearing loss associated with the ear and not the brain. Delicate cells in the inner ear are damaged in this type of hearing loss, and once these cells are damaged, they don’t regenerate. You’ll be unable to hear certain sounds in the environment, since the cells in the ear responsible for those sounds have been destroyed.

A 2006 study found that around 43% of those with RA had hearing loss! And a study from the Mayo Clinic, reported that even though they weren’t able to detect measurably higher rates of hearing loss among those with RA, their patients with RA were far more likely to perceive that they had hearing loss.

 

How does RA Lead to Hearing Loss?

Researchers are still unclear on the how rheumatoid arthritis and hearing loss are linked. However, it’s clear that RA can attack other body systems, not just the joints, so the cells in the ear can also be affected by this disease.

Another link could be the drugs used to treat the pain that goes hand in hand with arthritis. Many studies have found that common pain killers, such as ibuprofen (Advil) and acetaminophen (Tylenol) can cause hearing loss. Even taking these pain killers two or more days per week was linked to worse hearing health, while those who took pain killers six days a week had a 24% higher risk of hearing loss than those who didn’t take pain killers. Those suffering from RA often take a lot of painkillers just to get through the day, and these drugs are known to reduce blood flow and deprive the cells in the inner ear of the oxygen and nutrients they need to survive.

Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis

While doctors can’t cure RA, they all agree that treating the disease as soon as possible is essential for good health outcomes. Treating RA stops inflammation, prevents further joint damage or deformity, and relieves pain. It also improves overall well-being by allowing for increased mobility and physical function. Treatments include medications to ease symptoms, as well as to reduce inflammation and slow joint damage.

Self-management is also important when it comes to RA, and your doctor will help you be proactive in managing the disease and maintaining your overall quality of life. Eating well, exercising often and resting, using heat pads, and learning relaxation techniques all play a role in self-management.

Treating Hearing Loss

If you’ve been struggling to hear, and think it may be linked to your RA, call your local hearing center.

May is Arthritis Awareness Month

Posted in Awareness

What happens inside the body with covid19

The short on covid19 and what happens inside the body

It happens when someone infected with covid19 lets it out via a cough or sneeze

You can’t see it- but the droplet makes it’s way into someone else say their nose eyes or mouth

The virus

It can find its way deep inside the lungs. And hides and invades the cells in the air sacks in the lung.

They then high jack our cells machinery and uses our own body to replicate and grown more invaders , that tips off our immune system saying hey!!! Somethings wrong send help.

So the body sending in white blood cells to fight off the infection- but this causes the infection and now inflammation to produce pneumonia .

Which is fluid building up inside the air sac inside the lungs and this can become severe -So severe it can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

ARDS is the reason many will lose their life .

So please wash your hands often, keep them away from your face , cover your cough or sneeze with your elbow.

Better yet- Stay home.

Stop thinking it won’t happen to you.

Because you may be near someone who is infected and has no symptoms at all they you bring it home to a child spouse or elderly parent or grandparent.

Stay home 15 days

Wishing everyone a happy and healthy day.

Deb Andio.

Reference

Cleveland Clinic

https://health.clevelandclinic.org/heres-the-damage-coronavirus-covid-19-can-do-to-your-lungs/amp/

Phone is also attached to link of reference.

Posted in Awareness

What to do if you suddenly run out of energy-spoons when traveling

I love to travel but when I do, I know when I get home I will be wiped out by fatigue for sometimes 2-3-4 days.

This little mini trip was no exception.

Fatigue can often be described in various ways. Sometimes it is described as feeling a lack of energy and motivation (both mental and physical).

I had the privilege of going to Washington DC the last week of February 2020.

I participated in rare disease week, spoke on Capitol Hill seen so many historical places and also participated in a focus group.

It really was an amazing trip.

It was also exhausting.

I pushed my body to the limit, correction beyond my limit. I walked far too many steps than I was used to. But ya know what I did it, I made it sure it was tiring but I made it.

And I would do it all over again.

Of course I am paying the price now as I was literally exhausted for 3 days after I got back home.

But I enjoyed every minute of it.

A few things also caused me to use up a lot of my saved energy or spoons

Example: On the last night in Washington DC after I attended a focus group , I wanted to go on a bus tour for like an hour or 2, see some monuments at night but I was tired

I called the consiere who said the trolly picks you up at the hotel and brings you back to the hotel. I was sold and went on a night tour, we went to MLK monument, Jefferson,Back to Capitol at night, the White House , Korean War vet and Vietnam memorial, Lincoln monument, Arlington cemetery and lastly the Iwo Jima memorial, one of out lasts stops.

I was feeling great tired yes but invigorated from this tour, a woman younger than me also on the tour who had MS lost her balance when she was walking to the Iwo Jima memorial her cane went flying she fell, and as she was going down she tried to grab onto me and this caused me and a young man to also lose balance and so I fell, and he did to but he kind of rolled.

I however hit the ground so hard knee first I thought I shattered it.

All I did was pray dear GOD protect me , please don’t let this be the way my trip ends.

Thankfully this happened at the end of the tour. I felt pain and numbness but I also felt my knee swelling fast.

The tour bus dropped me off at the Capitol Hilton

I hobbled to my room after the tour starving, ordered room service cleaned my knee which by now was the size of a grapefruit .

I was hurting scared and a bit pissed off, should I go to the ER? Do I just wait when I get home tomorrow?

I called the George Washington Hospital and was told they are full of flu patients would have at least a 6 hour wait but I could come in.

I chose to wait.

I don’t think the woman on the tour meant to do that. It’s a natural reaction to reach out and stop from falling.

I think I was also so tired I just couldn’t keep myself from falling. That’s what pissed me off.

All my energy just went down the drain. I was hurt exhausted and I mean I was hurt.

I probably should have went to the ER

I chose to tough it out. Hobbled and got 2 buckets full of ice and made my own ice packs from zip lock bags wash cloth and hair scrunchie.

Oh I needed energy and was totally depleted but I had to dig deep and get moving for that ice.

All that great mojo was gone in an instant.

We cannot store up extra energy or “spoons” to use later unfortunately so sometimes we have a tendency to over do it when we feel good. And then when shit happens it’s exhausting.

Room service came with my leg propped up , so I ate and went to bed. The pain was so intense I was worried how the hell was going to make it through the airport the next day.

People see you are doing ok and this can lead them to assumptions – Some people thinking your suddenly well because you had a few good days .

People just don’t realize how much pain a person may be in because it’s an invisible disability.

People also don’t realize that a few goods days is exhausting.

And when you get hurt and you already suffer from chronic pain I swear it’s intensified 10 fold.

I’m usually a happy person and pain or no pain I am grateful that I am alive and can move.

That night I did all I could not to cry.

One thing pain has taught me is how to deal with pain.

I wish I didn’t have pain I hate it because pain is more than an occasional visitor in my body it’s more like a permanent unwelcome tenant.

Every time I feel a bit better something happens and the flipping pain is back all over again.

Most people have no idea what living with chronic pain is like.

I used to get offended when people would not recognize chronic joint pain as a disability.

I would love to see many of those who think that oh joint pain is no big deal do what I do in a day with the level of pain I have and still be as happy as I am.

Because I am happy, I just have to pace myself.

My life is all about pacing.

This is because everything I do cook, clean, sleep, walk, blog, travel, advocate,it all takes time. This gradual approach to every aspect of my life is not only about enlightenment or mindfulness.

It is about pain. Or more specifically, trying minimize it. Minimizing it is the key because I’ve learned it just can’t be avoided, at least not entirely, no matter my effort.

So take those spoons and energy and live your best life . You cannot store spoons but you can learn what to do when your spoons run out .

And remember rest even when your on vacation, eat well so you can be strong and hopefully you come home in the same shape as when you left.

It’s been a week since I’ve been home knee still swollen like a grapefruit

I did ho see my ortho and had xrays. I have a bad bone bruise and a lot of soft tissue swelling

It’s gonna take 4-6 at least I was told weeks and I hope it is back to where it was before the fall.

I’ll keep you updated

Please send positive vibes

Thanks

Deb

Also if you don’t know about spoon theory here is a good link

https://www.healthline.com/health/spoon-theory-chronic-illness-explained-like-never-before#1

Posted in Awareness

What Really Helps Arthritis

If you’re asking yourself- what can help my arthritis, I will try to clear up a few of the most popular misconceptions for you.

Here’s are a list of the most common questions about Arthritis and the facts about what can help arthritis pain.

1. Fact or Fiction? There is no cure for arthritis

True. There is no cure for arthritis; however, the discomfort and pain can be managed through medication, heat, splints, braces, adaptive devices and learning new ways to accomplish everyday tasks and activities.

2. Fact or Fiction? The weather makes a difference in how my joints feel

Fact. There’s a reason people move to Arizona. Dry, warm weather reduces joint pain. When the humidity is high and barometric pressure is low, particularly just before a storm, if you have arthritis you may feel increased pain or stiffness. If you live in a hot, humid climate, a dehumidifier in your home can help.  Most air conditioning systems also help reduce humidity, run it during the day and even overnight to help you sleep comfortably.

3. Fact or Fiction? My diet makes a difference in my arthritis symptoms and how I feel

Fact. Excess weight puts more stress on your joints. Keeping your weight in check helps protect them. Eating a balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables and a mix of grains and proteins makes good sense for everyone.

4. Fact or Fiction? I can’t exercise because I have arthritis

Fiction. Movement, including gently stretching, is important to increase strength and flexibility. Exercising also reduces the pain and stiffness in your joints. I love my recumbent bike.

You just have to think about how you work out. If running aggravates the arthritis in your knees and makes them ache, switch to a less intense and less weight-bearing exercise like swimming, biking or yoga.

Always consult with your health care provider before starting an exercise program.

5. Fact or Fiction? Nothing will reduce the pain of my arthritis

Fiction. Heat, ice, prescription and non-prescription medicines, topical ointments and splints can all help alleviate the pain and swelling associated with arthritis.

Cold and heat can both help when dealing with arthritis pain. Using heat in the morning relaxes muscles and reduces stiffness.

Using ice at night lessens joint inflammation for most people.

I personally like the heat from thermacare heat wraps. My joints just don’t tolerate cold.

Over-the-counter medications and prescription drugs can also be very beneficial in helping to control arthritis pain.

Non-prescription medications, including aspirin, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen, help control pain and swelling. But everyone can’t take them. Example you cannot take NSAIDS if you have had bariatric surgery. So always talk to your doctor.

Prescription medications, like COX-2 inhibitors, anti-TNF compounds, steroids, and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) help reduce swelling and pain and can prevent further damage. However steroids are known to cause Avascular Necrosis- Osteonecrosis

Speak with your health care provider or pharmacist to make sure you are taking the right medication, even nonprescription drugs can be harmful or ineffective if you are not taking them correctly or if they may cause an interaction with your other medications

Posted in Awareness

Eat Them Veggies

Eat them veggies

As long as you’re cracking them eggs, add some veggies like bell peppers, mushrooms, or spinach into the mix.

And any veggie goes down easier in a thick and delicious, creamy smoothie

Stir-fry’s are a great way to load up on the veggies . Toss all your favorites into a hot wok. Carrots, celery,red peppers,sugar snaps, and even cabbage add sweetness and taste amazing.

Why order in from your local Chinese place when you can make a healthier stir-fry in your own kitchen?

Veggie Stir Fry

Ingredients

1 pound firm tofu

8-10 cups sliced vegetables Aprox 1 cup each (I use yellow onions, carrots, peppers, mushrooms, celery, broccoli, asparagus, water chestnuts,bamboo shoots)

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 cups cooked rice or 3 cups cooked quinoa

Sauce:

1/4 cup veggie or chicken stock

1/4 cup natural soy sauce (low sodium if you prefer)or gf tamari

2 cloves garlic, pressed

1 tablespoons light brown sugar

1 tablespoon finely chopped ginger root

1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

1 teaspoon arrowroot powder

Instructions

Slice the tofu in 1/2 inch slices. Press between layered paper towels or clean kitchen towels to dry well. Cut slices into 1-inch cubes. Arrange on a plate with prepared vegetables, separated by variety.

Combine sauce ingredients except for arrowroot powder in a small bowl and stir until sugar is dissolved. Mix arrowroot powder with just enough cold water to dissolve in a custard cup or teacup (you’ll use less than 2 tsp water). Add to sauce, stir well and set aside.

Preheat a wok or large skillet.

Add the oil and vegetables (add the sturdier vegetables first, adding the more tender ones after one minute and cook over medium-high heat until just crisp tender, stirring constantly.

Add the tofu and stir very carefully until the tofu is heated.

Stir sauce and pour around edge of wok. Stir vegetables around in sauce as it thickens.

Remove from heat as soon as sauce is thickened and serve over rice or quinoa.

Sure, you could set out crudités with a creamy dip. Or you could double the veggies and whip them into the dip, too. Dig into beautiful beet hummus, cucumber raita, or healthy, homemade spinach dip, replacing the cream with yogurt.

Roasting veggies can tease out flavors you wouldn’t get otherwise, and it couldn’t be easier. Preheat the oven to 450°F (230°C). Pile bite-sized pieces of cauliflower, broccoli, or Brussels sprout on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Toss to coat and spread out. Roast until tender-crisp and golden, about 20 minutes. Try it: Roast Pork with Apples & Brussels

Stuffed vegetables are pure comfort; fresh produce is just part of the package deal. Keep the stuffing healthy with lean ground meat or beans and whole grains, but don’t forget a small sprinkle of cheese.

These are cheesy and hearty and just the right amount of spicy. Easy to freeze.

Spicy Stuffed Peppers

Ingredients

Spicy Rice

• 1 tablespoon olive oil

• 1 medium yellow onion chopped

• 2 jalapeno peppers chopped

• 4 cloves garlic chopped

• 3/4 cups long grain rice

• 12 ounces fire roasted tomatoes (I used a store bought can)

• 1.5 cups vegetable broth + more as needed

• 1 cup frozen corn – or fresh corn if you can get it!

• ½ cup frozen peas

• 1 tablespoon Cajun seasonings

• 1 teaspoon cayenne powder

• ½ teaspoon cumin

• Salt and pepper to taste

FOR THE STUFFED PEPPERS

• 1 cup shredded cheese (Cheddar is good, or Colby or Pepper Jack)

• 4 bell peppers

• Hot Sauce, spicy chili flakes, fresh chopped herbs for serving

Instructions

Get the rice going. Heat a large pan to medium heat and add olive oil.
Add onion and jalapeno peppers and cook about 5 minutes to soften.

Add garlic and cook another minute, until you can smell the yummy garlic.Add the rice and stir. Cook for a couple minutes, stirring, to very lightly brown the rice.Add the fire roasted tomatoes and vegetable broth.

Stir.
Add corn, peas, Cajun seasonings, cayenne, cumin, salt and pepper, and hot sauce if using. Stir and bring to a quick boil.
Reduce heat and simmer for about 20 minutes, or until the rice has absorbed all of the liquid and is softened to your liking. If it needs more cooking, add a bit more broth and keep it simmering until you LOVE it.
While the rice is cooking, bring a large pot of water to a boil.Slice the tops off of the bell peppers and remove the innards. Boil them about 5 minutes to slightly soften.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.Mix the rice and shredded cheese together and stuff each pepper full. You may have extra stuffing, depending on the size of your peppers.

Bake on a large baking sheet for 30-40 minutes.Remove from heat and top with your favorite hot sauce, fresh chopped herbs and spicy chili flakes

Stir unsweetened pumpkin puree into your morning oats for a filling breakfast that will leave you longing for fall. The pumpkin’s orange color means it’s packed with beta-carotene, contributing to your daily intake of vitamin A.

Almost any veggie goes down easier in a thick and delicious, creamy smoothie,especially when it’s blended with citrus to balance out any bitterness. Add a big handful of kale, chard, or spinach to your morning smoothie and then flex a little, knowing that you started your day with extra iron.

Sweet potato banana smoothie

Ingredients

• 1/2 cup sweet potato purée note you can also use pumpkin purée

• 1 -2 bananas frozen, and chopped into 1 inch cubes

• 1 cup canned lite coconut milk

• 1 teaspoons maple syrup

• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

• 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

• 1/2 teaspoon fresh grated nutmeg

• 2 tablespoon walnuts, or pecans chopped

Directions

Place all ingredients, except for some of the walnuts into blender and blend until smooth. Top with chopped walnuts.

Avocado toast is cool, but there are so many other veggies you can drop on top of whole-wheat bread. Start with a swipe of part-skim ricotta or hummus, then add hydrating tomatoes and cucumbers. Or, pair sautéed mushrooms with a sunnyside-up egg. – https://www.redbookmag.com/food-recipes/news/a20060/12-things-you-should-be-putting-on-toast/

You might not associate muffins with green vegetables, but zucchini is sweet, mild, and full of moisture, making it surprisingly delicious in bread, muffins, or pancakes. Try it: Zucchini Muffins with Chocolate Chips

Carrots wilting in the crisper? Overwhelmed by a big bunch of kale? Soup’s on. Dice different veggies into a chunky stew, or blend your favorite root vegetable completely smooth. Plus, you can always upgrade chicken broth with a big handful of greens and squeeze of lemon. Try it: Green Soup with Cashew Cream Swirl

References

Redbookmag.com

Fitbitt.com blog

Posted in awards,patient leader, Awareness

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Wow I am beyond honored I’ve now also been

Nominated for Patient Leader Hero- Healthcare Collaborator – Rookie of The Year and Best In Show Blog

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Endorsements Now Open If You Would Like to Vote (link below)

I have been nominated for the past few years in various categories

Thank You for considering Endorsing my nominations

It’s deeply appreciated

My Profile and Info WEGOHealth Link

Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis Education

FlexitarianForLife

My Links

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Posted in Awareness

Knee pain from exercise? Here’s what you should know….

Do you suffer with knee pain from exercise?

Here’s what you should know, according to Health’s medical expert.

Knee pain especially during and after exercise is a common exercise complaint.

The knee is an intricate joint, involving bones, menisci, muscles, tendons, and ligaments they all are working in rhythm supporting the joint.

If there is damage or stress to any of these components, you may have achy knees. Plus, many physical activities—running, jumping, stretching, bending—can put a lot of strain, impact, or body weight directly on the knees, and in turn, cause pain while you work out. This is common among weekend warriors who work out intensely but inconsistently. You can also develop tendonitis over time if you’re regularly doing these motions.

If you feel sharp sudden or stabbing pain stop and contact your physician.

Knee pain is a common complaint that affects people of all ages. Knee pain may be the result of an injury, such as a ruptured ligament or torn cartilage. Medical conditions — including arthritis, gout and infections — also can cause knee pain.

Many types of minor knee pain respond well to self-care measures. Physical therapy and knee braces also can help relieve knee pain. In some cases, however, your knee may require surgical repair.

Symptoms

The location and severity of knee pain may vary, depending on the cause of the problem. Signs and symptoms that sometimes accompany knee pain include:

  • Swelling and stiffness
  • Redness and warmth to the touch
  • Weakness or instability
  • Popping or crunching noises
  • Inability to fully straighten the knee

When to see a doctor

Call your doctor if you:

  • Can’t bear weight on your knee or feel as if your knee is unstable (gives out)
  • Have marked knee swelling
  • Are unable to fully extend or flex your knee
  • See an obvious deformity in your leg or knee
  • Have a fever, in addition to redness, pain and swelling in your knee
  • Have severe knee pain that is associated with an injury

Causes

Knee pain can be caused by injuries, mechanical problems, types of arthritis and other problems.

Injuries

A knee injury can affect any of the ligaments, tendons or fluid-filled sacs (bursae) that surround your knee joint as well as the bones, cartilage and ligaments that form the joint itself. Some of the more common knee injuries include:

  • ACL injury. An ACL injury is a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) — one of four ligaments that connect your shinbone to your thighbone. An ACL injury is particularly common in people who play basketball, soccer or other sports that require sudden changes in direction.
  • Fractures. The bones of the knee, including the kneecap (patella), can be broken during motor vehicle collisions or falls. People whose bones have been weakened by osteoporosis can sometimes sustain a knee fracture simply by stepping wrong.
  • Torn meniscus. The meniscus is formed of tough, rubbery cartilage and acts as a shock absorber between your shinbone and thighbone. It can be torn if you suddenly twist your knee while bearing weight on it.
  • Knee bursitis. Some knee injuries cause inflammation in the bursae, the small sacs of fluid that cushion the outside of your knee joint so that tendons and ligaments glide smoothly over the joint.
  • Patellar tendinitis. Tendinitis is irritation and inflammation of one or more tendons — the thick, fibrous tissues that attach muscles to bones. Runners, skiers, cyclists, and those involved in jumping sports and activities may develop inflammation in the patellar tendon, which connects the quadriceps muscle on the front of the thigh to the shinbone.

Mechanical problems

Some examples of mechanical problems that can cause knee pain include:

  • Loose body. Sometimes injury or degeneration of bone or cartilage can cause a piece of bone or cartilage to break off and float in the joint space. This may not create any problems unless the loose body interferes with knee joint movement, in which case the effect is something like a pencil caught in a door hinge.
  • Iliotibial band syndrome. This occurs when the tough band of tissue that extends from the outside of your hip to the outside of your knee (iliotibial band) becomes so tight that it rubs against the outer portion of your femur. Distance runners and cyclists are especially susceptible to iliotibial band syndrome.
  • Dislocated kneecap. This occurs when the triangular bone (patella) that covers the front of your knee slips out of place, usually to the outside of your knee. In some cases, the kneecap may stay displaced and you’ll be able to see the dislocation.
  • Hip or foot pain. If you have hip or foot pain, you may change the way you walk to spare these painful joints. But this altered gait can place more stress on your knee joint. In some cases, problems in the hip or foot can cause knee pain.

Types of arthritis

More than 100 different types of arthritis exist. The varieties most likely to affect the knee include:

  • Osteoarthritis. Sometimes called degenerative arthritis, osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It’s a wear-and-tear condition that occurs when the cartilage in your knee deteriorates with use and age.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. The most debilitating form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune condition that can affect almost any joint in your body, including your knees. Although rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease, it tends to vary in severity and may even come and go.
  • Gout. This type of arthritis occurs when uric acid crystals build up in the joint. While gout most commonly affects the big toe, it can also occur in the knee.
  • Pseudogout. Often mistaken for gout, pseudogout is caused by calcium-containing crystals that develop in the joint fluid. Knees are the most common joint affected by pseudogout.
  • Septic arthritis. Sometimes your knee joint can become infected, leading to swelling, pain and redness. Septic arthritis often occurs with a fever, and there’s usually no trauma before the onset of pain. Septic arthritis can quickly cause extensive damage to the knee cartilage. If you have knee pain with any of these symptoms, see your doctor right away.

Other problems

Patellofemoral

pain syndrome is a general term that refers to pain arising between the kneecap (patella) and the underlying thighbone (femur). It’s common in athletes; in young adults, especially those who have a slight maltracking of the kneecap; and in older adults, who usually develop the condition as a result of arthritis of the kneecap.

Osteonecrosis

Also called: Aseptic necrosis, Avascular necrosis, Ischemic necrosis

Osteonecrosis is a disease caused by reduced blood flow to bones in the joints. In people with healthy bones, new bone is always replacing old bone. In osteonecrosis, the lack of blood causes the bone to break down faster than the body can make enough new bone. The bone starts to die and may break down.

You can have osteonecrosis in one or several bones. It is most common in the upper leg. Other common sites are your upper arm and your knees, shoulders and ankles. The disease can affect men and women of any age, but it usually strikes in your thirties, forties or fifties. 

At first, you might not have any symptoms. As the disease gets worse, you will probably have joint pain that becomes more severe. You may not be able to bend or move the affected joint very well. 

No one is sure what causes the disease. Risk factors include 

  • Long-term steroid treatment
  • Alcohol abuse
  • Joint injuries
  • Having certain diseases, including arthritis and cancer 

Doctors use imaging tests and other tests to diagnose osteonecrosis. Treatments include medicines, using crutches, limiting activities that put weight on the affected joints, electrical stimulation and surgery.

Risk factors

A number of factors can increase your risk of having knee problems, including:

  • Excess weight. Being overweight or obese increases stress on your knee joints, even during ordinary activities such as walking or going up and down stairs. It also puts you at increased risk of osteoarthritis by accelerating the breakdown of joint cartilage.
  • Lack of muscle flexibility or strength. A lack of strength and flexibility can increase the risk of knee injuries. Strong muscles help to stabilize and protect your joints, and muscle flexibility can help you achieve full range of motion.
  • Certain sports or occupations. Some sports put greater stress on your knees than do others. Alpine skiing with its rigid ski boots and potential for falls, basketball’s jumps and pivots, and the repeated pounding your knees take when you run or jog all increase your risk of knee injury. Jobs that require repetitive stress on the knees such as construction or farming also can increase your risk.
  • Previous injury. Having a previous knee injury makes it more likely that you’ll injure your knee again.

Complications

Not all knee pain is serious. But some knee injuries and medical conditions, such as osteoarthritis, can lead to increasing pain, joint damage and disability if left untreated. And having a knee injury — even a minor one — makes it more likely that you’ll have similar injuries in the future.

Prevention

Although it’s not always possible to prevent knee pain, the following suggestions may help forestall injuries and joint deterioration:

  • Keep extra pounds off. Maintain a healthy weight; it’s one of the best things you can do for your knees. Every extra pound puts additional strain on your joints, increasing the risk of injuries and osteoarthritis.
  • Be in shape to play your sport. To prepare your muscles for the demands of sports participation, take time for conditioning. Work with a coach or trainer to ensure that your technique and movement are the best they can be.
  • Practice perfectly. Make sure the technique and movement patterns you use in your sports or activity are the best they can be. Lessons from a professional can be very helpful.
  • Get strong, stay flexible. Because weak muscles are a leading cause of knee injuries, you’ll benefit from building up your quadriceps and hamstrings, which support your knees. Balance and stability training helps the muscles around your knees work together more effectively. And because tight muscles also can contribute to injury, stretching is important. Try to include flexibility exercises in your workouts.
  • Be smart about exercise. If you have osteoarthritis, chronic knee pain or recurring injuries, you may need to change the way you exercise. Consider switching to swimming, water aerobics or other low-impact activities — at least for a few days a week. Sometimes simply limiting high-impact activities will provide relief.
Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis

What your eating maybe worsening your Osteoarthritis

Your eating what?

Before you take one more bite of that fast food lunch or dinner consider how it affects your osteoarthritis.

Did you know that research shows that diets high in saturated fat – found in red meat, butter, cheese, lard and processed foods – can weaken knee cartilage, making it more prone to damage.

Yep so start eating more plants

There was a study in 2017 published in Arthritis Care & Research, researchers followed more than 2,000 patients with OA for up to four years, checking disease progression  and diet at yearly intervals. Participants who ate the most fat, especially the saturated kind, showed increasing joint damage, whereas those who ate healthy fats like olive oil and avocados had little disease progression.

Another recent animal study showed that it even may harm the underlying bone, according to Yin Xiao, PhD, a professor at Queensland University of Technology in Australia and lead author of a 2017 study that looked at the effect of diet on OA.

“Our findings suggest that it’s not wear and tear but diet that has a lot to do with the onset of osteoarthritis,” he says.

Blame It On Inflammation

Fat’s not the only culprit, though. Sugar, refined carbs, red meat, processed food and corn and soybean oils can spark inflammation, too. Barry Sears, PhD, a long-time researcher in inflammatory nutrition, says eating them is “like throwing a match into a vat of gasoline.”

These foods also tend to pack on pounds, putting extra pressure on stressed joints. To make matters worse, body fat, especially the kind that collects around your belly, makes its own inflammatory proteins, perpetuating the cycle of inflammation even after you’ve sworn off junk food forever.

Fighting Back

The solution is to change the way you eat. Switching to an anti-inflammatory or Mediterranean-style diet can help you lose weight and significantly improve your joint, heart and  brain health without sacrificing good taste.

An anti-inflammatory diet is heavy on fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and healthy fats like olive oil, avocados and nuts. Poultry’s allowed  now and then and you can have one glass of red wine or beer a day. Off the menu, as you might expect, are sugar, red meat, and processed foods.

What sets this way of eating apart is that it actively fights inflammation, experts say.

“There are a variety of foods in the Mediterranean diet that are high in fiber, beta carotene, magnesium and omega 3s, all of which have been found to reduce inflammatory markers in human studies,” explains Michelle Babb, MS, RD, a Seattle-based nutrition educator.

“I’ve had [arthritis] patients who have been able to discontinue the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a result of transitioning to a Mediterranean diet. Some even report a noticeable difference in pain in the first week.”

Even so, changing the way you eat can be daunting.

“Don’t expect your diet to change overnight,” advises Sotiria Everett, EdD, RD, an assistant professor at Stonybrook University Medical Center in New York. “Start by looking at what you’re eating now (a food diary is a great way to do this) and identifying areas where you can improve.”

But Babb doesn’t see a problem. Her patients “really enjoy this food plan and don’t feel it’s a hardship to follow it,” she says.

She admits it takes more work and advance planning than the drive-through and recommends prepping some food for the week in advance.

I personally can agree with this as when I stopped eating so much red meat and cut out sugar and most processed junk I felt much better .

And when I eat things that are not as healthy as they should be I feel more pain.

So try a plant based diet or as they suggest Mediterranean

You will be so glad you did.

This taken from article Arthritis Foundation Blog