Posted in Awareness

All About Knee Pain Part 5 of 6

Part 5 knee

Treatments

Conservative care

Many types of knee pain can be relieved and/or resolved with conservative treatments such as:

Rest When the knee is injured or is inflamed, as in bursitis, tendonitis or arthritis, it’s important to rest the joint and avoid overuse. That may mean keeping the knee straight (extended) or in positions that limit bending.

Ice/heat Applying ice or cold packs to the knee can reduce inflammation and swelling, especially after an injury. Once swelling is gone, heat may be used to help relax and loosen tissues – although ice is the primary treatment.

Pain relievers Over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medicines can help relieve knee pain, including ibuprofen (Advil®) and naproxen (Aleve®).

Weight loss Your doctor may recommend that you lose weight to reduce pressure on your knee.

Braces In general, knee braces wrap around the knee and leg and help limit unwanted movement while supporting the knee. They are commonly used when knee ligaments are weak, and help to keep the knee from “buckling.” Braces will provide support during healing, but are not a primary treatment for arthritic degeneration.

There is a variety of braces. Functional braces are designed to support knees that have suffered an impact-related injury. Rehabilitative braces provide support when recovering from a surgery or injury. Uploading/offloading braces are used by patients with arthritis and help to stabilize the knee when standing up or sitting down

Physical therapy

Once your doctor diagnoses the cause of your knee pain, physical therapy may be the next step. Physical therapists can show you specific exercise programs that will help you recover from the injury and decrease the pain you are experiencing. They also may demonstrate low-impact stretches and exercises that can strengthen muscles in your knee, improve stability and flexibility, and reduce pressure on the joint. They can advise you on helpful lowimpact aerobic exercises, such as swimming and cycling, that won’t aggravate your knee pain. Physical therapy also is an important part of recovery after knee surgery.

Injections

I personally am not a fan of these. I personally get more pain when o have had them. And they can lead to faster break down of bone tissue and can lead to Osteonecrosis.

Steroid (or more commonly known as cortisone) shots can be placed inside the knee to reduce pain and inflammation.

Another nonsurgical procedure that can provide relief from knee pain is viscosupplementation. Administered in the doctor’s office, this treatment involves injecting a lubricant into the knee. The filler lubricates and adds cushioning to the joint, allowing bones to move more easily and reducing friction.

In some cases, relief from viscosupplementation can last for months. It can be a viable, though short-term, solution for mild to moderate osteoarthritic knee pain.

Prp injections

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy uses injections of a concentration of a patient’s own platelets to accelerate the healing of injured tendons, ligaments, muscles and joints. In this way, PRP injections use each individual patient’s own healing system to improve musculoskeletal problems. I have had this and I had a good result. Healed no but a better outcome and mobility than I had.

Posted in Awareness

All about Knee pain part 4 of 6

 

Part 4 knees

How is knee pain diagnosed?

 

When diagnosing any knee pain, the physician will take your medical history and perform a thorough physical examination.

To help your doctor best understand your knee pain, you’ll need to provide the following information:

• A description of your knee pain (aching, tenderness, burning or swelling)

• Where the pain is located and when it occurs

• When the pain started (and if it is the result of an injury or accident)

• Anything that makes the pain worse or better

Your doctor also may order imaging tests to view the joint, which may include the following:

X-rays – An X-ray can show if there are certain problems, such as deterioration or fracture, within your knee.

MRI – In some cases, your doctors may order a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. An MRI provides significantly more detail about the soft tissues in your knee, such as the cartilage on the surface of the bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles.

CT scan – Computerized tomography scans combine X-ray views from multiple angles, creating a two- or three-dimensional, cross-sectional image. These images show “slices” of bone and soft tissue.

 

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All About Our Knees Part 3 of 6

Part 3 knee

Knee injuries can be the result of sports, falls or trauma. They typically involve the ligaments that hold two of the bones of the knee – the femur and tibia – together. Here are some of the most common types:

Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are among the most common and dreaded sports injuries. Your ACL keeps your knee from moving too far out of position. Changing directions too quickly or hyperextending the knee can tear the ACL. Women are more prone to tearing the ACL. Surgery is often necessary to repair damage to an ACL.

A stretch or tear of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is typically caused by a hit or blow to the outer knee. Pain is felt along the inner knee. Bracing and conservative treatment, such as rest and physical therapy, are usually sufficient to heal these injuries.

The meniscus is crescent-shaped cartilage between your thigh bone (femur) and lower leg bone (tibia). You have two of these cushions in each of your knees, inner (medial) and outer (lateral). The medial one is most often injured. These injuries often are caused by sudden twisting, resulting in swelling, pain and locking of the knee. Arthroscopic surgery may be necessary to remove the torn fragment when conservative treatment does not help.

Posted in Awareness

All About Our Knees Part 2

Types of Pain

What are the different types of knee pain?

Knee pain has many causes. Some of the most common include:

Osteoarthritis

Arthritis is a chronic condition that causes joint inflammation. Symptoms include redness, warmth, swelling, tenderness and pain. Up to 30 percent of the population may have knee osteoarthritis, or “wear and tear” arthritis. This is the gradual breakdown of the cartilage in the knee. Also called degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis usually develops over years and often is found in patients who have had a knee infection or injury and those who are overweight.

As cartilage wears away, the bones around it can grow thicker and develop bony spurs. This can lead to increased friction between the bones and disrupted movement in your knee. This also can lead to problems with the synovium, a membrane in your knee that produces a liquid to keep your cartilage slippery. This membrane can become inflamed and make too much fluid. This results in swelling, or “water on the knee.” In the most severe cases, the knee can become deformed as the continued friction wears away the bone.

Common symptoms of osteoarthritis include pain, stiffness, tenderness, a limited range of motion and a grating sensation when you bend your knee. The pain is usually worse after activity.

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis can affect joints on both sides of the body (both knees, both hands and/or both wrists). In rheumatoid arthritis, your body’s cells attack your own tissues. While in most people symptoms develop gradually over years, they can appear rapidly. Rheumatoid arthritis affects three to five times more women than men and often presents between the ages of 20 and 50.

Rheumatoid arthritis may be related to a combination of abnormal immunity and genetic, environmental and hormonal factors. Over time, rheumatoid arthritis can cause cartilage to wear away, swelling in the synovium, and excess fluid in the knee. In later stages, bones can rub against each other.

Bursitis

Bursitis is the inflammation of any of the fluid-filled sacs (bursae) protecting the body’s joints. This is usually caused by repetitive motions or by a stress such as kneeling. Sometimes, a sudden injury can cause bursitis.

Tendonitis

The tendons – rope-like tissues connecting muscles to bone at the knee and other joints – can become painfully inflamed by repetitive and strenuous movement. Tendonitis is a common sports injury, caused by overuse of the same parts of the body. Patellar tendinitis, or “jumper’s knee,” is an inflammation or irritation of the tendon between the knee cap and the shin bone.

Baker’s cyst

A lump behind your knee could be a Baker’s cyst. A Baker’s cyst, also called a popliteal cyst, is a fluid-filled pocket that causes swelling and tightness behind the knee. Often, it is not painful. A Baker’s cyst is typically associated with arthritis or a cartilage tear, conditions that can cause your knee to produce too much fluid. The key to treatment is to find the underlying cause of the fluid accumulating in the Baker’s cyst.

Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS)

Knee pain or discomfort while walking up and down stairs, jumping or squatting may be symptoms of patellofemoral pain syndrome. This common knee problem is felt toward the front of the knee. It can cause a grinding sensation when bending or straightening your leg, and can cause your knee to occasionally buckle. Sometimes called “runner’s knee,” patellofemoral pain syndrome may be caused by a kneecap that is not aligned properly, overuse, injury, excess weight or when the cartilage in the knee cap is worn significantly.

Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis

Osteonecrosis of the knee (also known as avascular necrosis) is a painful condition that occurs when the blood supply to a section of bone in the femur (thighbone) or tibia (shinbone) is disrupted. The pain varies from no pain to severe hot pain. Like bathe feeling of being hit in knee with a hot iron or sharp stabbing lightening bolt pain. Treatment can vary depending on stage from Prp injections to Total Knee Replacement.

SPONK Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the knee comes on suddenly.

Posted in Awareness

All About Our Knees Part 1 of a 6 part series.

About the knee 1 of 6

Did you know that your knee is the largest joint in your body. Its a really amazing and complex mechanism made of bone, cartilage and ligaments. The cartilage in your knee acts as a cushion and gliding surface. So the knee can move freely.

When the knee is healthy, the cartilage keeps the bones in the joint from rubbing together. However, when the joint is affected by arthritis, the bones make contact and cause mild or severe pain.

Injuries, as well as aging and degenerative conditions such as arthritis, osteoarthritis can cause the cartilage to break down.

Things like osteonecrosis of the knee (also known as avascular necrosis) is a painful condition that occurs when the blood supply to a section of bone in the femur (thighbone) or tibia (shinbone) is disrupted. And eventually can lead to severe osteoarthritis and even joint collapse.

Knee pain can affect every step you take. From playing sports to climbing steps, knee pain is difficult to ignore.

Some home remedies may help temporarily, but if you have chronic pain or symptoms such as swollen or red joints, it’s time to see a doctor.

I am not a fan of steroid injections or corticosteroids period as they can lead to Osteonecrosis.

And in my opinion doctors use these way too much for me. It seems like the go to drug for everything.

Because it helps inflammation but When prescribed in doses that exceed your body’s usual levels, corticosteroids suppress inflammation. This can reduce the signs and symptoms of inflammatory conditions, such as arthritis and asthma.

But they also have side effects like

What side effects can corticosteroids cause?

  • Elevated pressure in the eyes (glaucoma)
  • Fluid retention, causing swelling in your lower legs.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Problems with mood swings, memory and behavior and other psychological effects, such as confusion or delirium. Just to name a few.
Posted in Awareness

Knee pain from exercise? Here’s what you should know….

Do you suffer with knee pain from exercise?

Here’s what you should know, according to Health’s medical expert.

Knee pain especially during and after exercise is a common exercise complaint.

The knee is an intricate joint, involving bones, menisci, muscles, tendons, and ligaments they all are working in rhythm supporting the joint.

If there is damage or stress to any of these components, you may have achy knees. Plus, many physical activities—running, jumping, stretching, bending—can put a lot of strain, impact, or body weight directly on the knees, and in turn, cause pain while you work out. This is common among weekend warriors who work out intensely but inconsistently. You can also develop tendonitis over time if you’re regularly doing these motions.

If you feel sharp sudden or stabbing pain stop and contact your physician.

Knee pain is a common complaint that affects people of all ages. Knee pain may be the result of an injury, such as a ruptured ligament or torn cartilage. Medical conditions — including arthritis, gout and infections — also can cause knee pain.

Many types of minor knee pain respond well to self-care measures. Physical therapy and knee braces also can help relieve knee pain. In some cases, however, your knee may require surgical repair.

Symptoms

The location and severity of knee pain may vary, depending on the cause of the problem. Signs and symptoms that sometimes accompany knee pain include:

  • Swelling and stiffness
  • Redness and warmth to the touch
  • Weakness or instability
  • Popping or crunching noises
  • Inability to fully straighten the knee

When to see a doctor

Call your doctor if you:

  • Can’t bear weight on your knee or feel as if your knee is unstable (gives out)
  • Have marked knee swelling
  • Are unable to fully extend or flex your knee
  • See an obvious deformity in your leg or knee
  • Have a fever, in addition to redness, pain and swelling in your knee
  • Have severe knee pain that is associated with an injury

Causes

Knee pain can be caused by injuries, mechanical problems, types of arthritis and other problems.

Injuries

A knee injury can affect any of the ligaments, tendons or fluid-filled sacs (bursae) that surround your knee joint as well as the bones, cartilage and ligaments that form the joint itself. Some of the more common knee injuries include:

  • ACL injury. An ACL injury is a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) — one of four ligaments that connect your shinbone to your thighbone. An ACL injury is particularly common in people who play basketball, soccer or other sports that require sudden changes in direction.
  • Fractures. The bones of the knee, including the kneecap (patella), can be broken during motor vehicle collisions or falls. People whose bones have been weakened by osteoporosis can sometimes sustain a knee fracture simply by stepping wrong.
  • Torn meniscus. The meniscus is formed of tough, rubbery cartilage and acts as a shock absorber between your shinbone and thighbone. It can be torn if you suddenly twist your knee while bearing weight on it.
  • Knee bursitis. Some knee injuries cause inflammation in the bursae, the small sacs of fluid that cushion the outside of your knee joint so that tendons and ligaments glide smoothly over the joint.
  • Patellar tendinitis. Tendinitis is irritation and inflammation of one or more tendons — the thick, fibrous tissues that attach muscles to bones. Runners, skiers, cyclists, and those involved in jumping sports and activities may develop inflammation in the patellar tendon, which connects the quadriceps muscle on the front of the thigh to the shinbone.

Mechanical problems

Some examples of mechanical problems that can cause knee pain include:

  • Loose body. Sometimes injury or degeneration of bone or cartilage can cause a piece of bone or cartilage to break off and float in the joint space. This may not create any problems unless the loose body interferes with knee joint movement, in which case the effect is something like a pencil caught in a door hinge.
  • Iliotibial band syndrome. This occurs when the tough band of tissue that extends from the outside of your hip to the outside of your knee (iliotibial band) becomes so tight that it rubs against the outer portion of your femur. Distance runners and cyclists are especially susceptible to iliotibial band syndrome.
  • Dislocated kneecap. This occurs when the triangular bone (patella) that covers the front of your knee slips out of place, usually to the outside of your knee. In some cases, the kneecap may stay displaced and you’ll be able to see the dislocation.
  • Hip or foot pain. If you have hip or foot pain, you may change the way you walk to spare these painful joints. But this altered gait can place more stress on your knee joint. In some cases, problems in the hip or foot can cause knee pain.

Types of arthritis

More than 100 different types of arthritis exist. The varieties most likely to affect the knee include:

  • Osteoarthritis. Sometimes called degenerative arthritis, osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It’s a wear-and-tear condition that occurs when the cartilage in your knee deteriorates with use and age.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. The most debilitating form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune condition that can affect almost any joint in your body, including your knees. Although rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease, it tends to vary in severity and may even come and go.
  • Gout. This type of arthritis occurs when uric acid crystals build up in the joint. While gout most commonly affects the big toe, it can also occur in the knee.
  • Pseudogout. Often mistaken for gout, pseudogout is caused by calcium-containing crystals that develop in the joint fluid. Knees are the most common joint affected by pseudogout.
  • Septic arthritis. Sometimes your knee joint can become infected, leading to swelling, pain and redness. Septic arthritis often occurs with a fever, and there’s usually no trauma before the onset of pain. Septic arthritis can quickly cause extensive damage to the knee cartilage. If you have knee pain with any of these symptoms, see your doctor right away.

Other problems

Patellofemoral

pain syndrome is a general term that refers to pain arising between the kneecap (patella) and the underlying thighbone (femur). It’s common in athletes; in young adults, especially those who have a slight maltracking of the kneecap; and in older adults, who usually develop the condition as a result of arthritis of the kneecap.

Osteonecrosis

Also called: Aseptic necrosis, Avascular necrosis, Ischemic necrosis

Osteonecrosis is a disease caused by reduced blood flow to bones in the joints. In people with healthy bones, new bone is always replacing old bone. In osteonecrosis, the lack of blood causes the bone to break down faster than the body can make enough new bone. The bone starts to die and may break down.

You can have osteonecrosis in one or several bones. It is most common in the upper leg. Other common sites are your upper arm and your knees, shoulders and ankles. The disease can affect men and women of any age, but it usually strikes in your thirties, forties or fifties. 

At first, you might not have any symptoms. As the disease gets worse, you will probably have joint pain that becomes more severe. You may not be able to bend or move the affected joint very well. 

No one is sure what causes the disease. Risk factors include 

  • Long-term steroid treatment
  • Alcohol abuse
  • Joint injuries
  • Having certain diseases, including arthritis and cancer 

Doctors use imaging tests and other tests to diagnose osteonecrosis. Treatments include medicines, using crutches, limiting activities that put weight on the affected joints, electrical stimulation and surgery.

Risk factors

A number of factors can increase your risk of having knee problems, including:

  • Excess weight. Being overweight or obese increases stress on your knee joints, even during ordinary activities such as walking or going up and down stairs. It also puts you at increased risk of osteoarthritis by accelerating the breakdown of joint cartilage.
  • Lack of muscle flexibility or strength. A lack of strength and flexibility can increase the risk of knee injuries. Strong muscles help to stabilize and protect your joints, and muscle flexibility can help you achieve full range of motion.
  • Certain sports or occupations. Some sports put greater stress on your knees than do others. Alpine skiing with its rigid ski boots and potential for falls, basketball’s jumps and pivots, and the repeated pounding your knees take when you run or jog all increase your risk of knee injury. Jobs that require repetitive stress on the knees such as construction or farming also can increase your risk.
  • Previous injury. Having a previous knee injury makes it more likely that you’ll injure your knee again.

Complications

Not all knee pain is serious. But some knee injuries and medical conditions, such as osteoarthritis, can lead to increasing pain, joint damage and disability if left untreated. And having a knee injury — even a minor one — makes it more likely that you’ll have similar injuries in the future.

Prevention

Although it’s not always possible to prevent knee pain, the following suggestions may help forestall injuries and joint deterioration:

  • Keep extra pounds off. Maintain a healthy weight; it’s one of the best things you can do for your knees. Every extra pound puts additional strain on your joints, increasing the risk of injuries and osteoarthritis.
  • Be in shape to play your sport. To prepare your muscles for the demands of sports participation, take time for conditioning. Work with a coach or trainer to ensure that your technique and movement are the best they can be.
  • Practice perfectly. Make sure the technique and movement patterns you use in your sports or activity are the best they can be. Lessons from a professional can be very helpful.
  • Get strong, stay flexible. Because weak muscles are a leading cause of knee injuries, you’ll benefit from building up your quadriceps and hamstrings, which support your knees. Balance and stability training helps the muscles around your knees work together more effectively. And because tight muscles also can contribute to injury, stretching is important. Try to include flexibility exercises in your workouts.
  • Be smart about exercise. If you have osteoarthritis, chronic knee pain or recurring injuries, you may need to change the way you exercise. Consider switching to swimming, water aerobics or other low-impact activities — at least for a few days a week. Sometimes simply limiting high-impact activities will provide relief.
Posted in Awareness

Risks – Knee Replacement

Knee replacement is a common procedure most often used to treat pain and disability caused by osteoarthritis. Deep infection is a rare but serious complication that occurs in about 1% of knee replacement patients. In some cases, patients require an additional knee operation.

British researchers have pinpointed which factors put knee replacement patients at high risk for severe infection and repeat surgery. “This information provides me with the strong evidence I need to discuss the risk of infection with my patients undergoing knee replacement and helps us identify strategies to minimize that risk,” said study co-author Dr. Michael Whitehouse. He’s a consultant in trauma and orthopedic surgery at the University of Bristol Medical School.

In this study, researchers analyzed data on more than 670,000 knee replacement patients in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man, including more than 3,600 who needed another knee operation due to infection.

The leading patient-related risk factors for severe infection after knee replacement were:

• Being younger than 60

• Being male

• Having chronic pulmonary disease

• Living with diabetes or liver disease

• Having a higher body mass index (BMI)

The researchers also found that the reason for knee replacement, the type of procedure performed, and the type of knee replacement influenced the risk of needing more surgery due to infection. Patients who had knee replacement after an injury, inflammatory arthritis or a history of previous infection in an affected knee were more likely to require additional surgery due to infection.

Patients with cemented total knee replacements were more likely to undergo additional surgery due to infection than those with an uncemented implant. The experience of the surgeon and the size of the orthopedic center had little or no effect on the risk of repeat surgery due to infection.

The study was published April 17 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal.

More information

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has more on Knee Replacement Info

Upwellbeing Link .

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, exercise, Factor V Leiden, Food Is Thy Medicine, Inflammation, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Pain, Positivity, Uncategorized, Weather, Winter

Knee Pain In The Winter

Knees not feeling great this time of year?
Do you need a thermometer to let you know when the temperatures change outside?
Or do your joints painfully serve as your weather forecast? Unfortunately, for many who suffer from osteoarthritis or other inflammatory conditions, cold weather can cause havoc on already vulnerable parts of your body.
What causes the pain?
The Barometric pressure drops in winter. Researchers believe that when this happens, inflamed areas of our bodies (knees, hips, hands, elbows, and shoulders) swell. Swelling can irritate nerves, which results in increased pain.

Also low vitamin D levels add to pain

You may need more of the sunshine vitamin, suggests new research from the Clinical Journal of Pain.

Compared to those osteoarthritis sufferers with adequate vitamin D levels, those short on D reported significantly more knee pain and loss of function, according to the study data. Those results held regardless of a person’s weight, although the obese study participants were more likely to suffer from a vitamin D deficiency.

There are several different ways low D might mess with your knees, roughly 42% of Americans are dangerously low when it comes to vitamin D. You get most of your D from sun exposure.

A simple blood test from your doctor can determine whether you’re low in the vitamin, If you’re deficient, taking a vitamin D supplement for several months can help you raise your levels. While it’s difficult to get too much D, the amount you need depends on your weight and body composition. Your body stores vitamin D in the fat cells, meaning those with greater amounts of body fat require more of the vitamin to limit pain and loss of function.

Another good reason to keep vitamin D levels in good range is low D doubles your risk for dementia.

Ways to Keep knees warm and ease pain this winter
Thermacare heat wraps
I love these they help pain and keep my joints warm which allows me to move easier

Eat a balanced diet I have personally had great pain relief since changing to mostly plant based diet.

Follow a healthy diet by including seasonal fruits, vegetables, nuts grains,seeds .

It is essential for people who are already suffering from joint and knee pain to include foods rich in Vitamin K, D and C (like oranges, spinach, cabbage and tomatoes) into their diet; as they play an important role in the production of cartilage and helps the body absorb calcium thus strengthening the bones.

I also have learned hydration is also important for pain relief. Try to drink plenty of water or herbal teas, like nettle tea , chamomile ,ginger tea as our dehydration reduces flexibility, which can increase the chances of injury. Supplements with vitamin D or fish oil is recommended as it is rich in omega 3 which helps decrease inflammation. Stay away from unhealthy drinks. Alcohol, tea, coffee, and other aerated drinks reduce the amount of calcium you absorb, and weaken bones.

Swap your caffeine-fuelled drinks with water and fresh juices.

Stay Active
Exercise regularly. It not only helps you lose weight but also increases flexibility and strengthens the muscles that support the knee ( walking, swimming or cycling). Your knees experience about three to four times your body weight when you walk, so lose weight to help your knees.
Always check with your Doctor before starting any new exercise.

Fun Fact :

Keep your feet warm. Your big toe is your body’s thermostat, so keep it warm and your whole body will be warm.

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