Posted in Adrenals, Awareness, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Diagnosed, Ease your Stress, Endocrinologist, Hashimoto, Meditation, Mindfulness, Naturopath, Thoughts, Uncategorized, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards

Adrenal Fatigue

I find that more I learn about Naturopath’s the more I trust them. They explain things better, they take time to listen to you,they think outside the box.

My Naturopath Dr Danni is great she listens, actively listens when you talk to her.

My endocrinologist hears but doesn’t really listen. This happens often.

He finally listened to me when I asked for a Thyroid Antibody rest because I had a feeling for years I had Hashimoto and hypothyroidism. I mean you can’t feel this exhausted and foggy for no reason.

But many just snubbed me thinking they knew more than I did.

I was also told by many MDs adrenal fatigue doesn’t really exist……really?

So I did some checking…..

What Is It?

The term “adrenal fatigue” was coined in 1998 by James Wilson, PhD, a naturopath and expert in alternative medicine. He describes it as a “group of related signs and symptoms (a syndrome) that results when the adrenal glands function below the necessary level.” He says it’s usually associated with intense stress and often follows chronic infections like bronchitis, flu, or pneumonia.

Wilson says people with it may not have any physical signs of illness but still may feel tired, “gray,” and have fatigue that doesn’t get better with sleep. They also crave salty snacks.

The Theory Behind It

Your body’s immune system responds by slowing down when you’re under stress. Your adrenal glands, which are small organs above your kidneys, respond to stress by releasing hormones like cortisol. They regulate your blood pressure and how your heart works.

According to the theory, if you have long-term stress (like the death of a family member or a serious illness), your adrenal glands can’t continuously produce the extra cortisol you need to feel good. So adrenal fatigue sets in.

There’s no approved test for adrenal fatigue. Blood tests can’t detect a small drop in adrenal production.

The suggested treatments for healthy adrenal function are a diet low in sugar, caffeine, and junk food, and “targeted nutritional supplementation” that includes vitamins and minerals:

• Vitamins B5, B6, and B12

Vitamin C

Magnesium

Probiotics and a variety of herbal supplements are also recommended to help your body make more cortisol.

Is It a Myth?

There’s no science to back it up. The Endocrine Society, the world’s largest organization of endocrinologists (people who research and treat patients with diseases related to glands and hormones), flatly says that adrenal fatigue is not a real disease. And it says the symptoms of adrenal fatigue are so general, they can apply to many diseases or conditions (depression, sleep apnea, fibromyalgia) or stem from everyday life.

And the society says some of the treatments can be dangerous. Improving your diet will probably make you feel better, no matter what ailment you have, but taking supplements to help your body produce extra cortisol if you don’t need them may cause your adrenal glands to stop working, it warns

What Else Could It Be?

Symptoms such as being tired, lacking energy, and sleeping all day long could be signs of depression, sleep apnea, fibromyalgia, or a condition called adrenal insufficiency.

What Is Adrenal Insufficiency?

Unlike adrenal fatigue, this is a recognized disease that can be diagnosed. There are two forms of this condition, and both are caused by damage or problems with your adrenal glands that result in them not making enough of the hormone cortisol.

Symptoms of both forms include chronic fatigue, loss of appetite, muscle weakness, weight loss, and stomach pain. You might also have nausea, vomiting, low blood pressure, diarrhea, depression, or darkening of the skin.

Adrenal insufficiency is diagnosed with a blood test that checks to see if your cortisol levels are too low. If you have it, you’ll need to take a hormone replacement.

This taken from Web MD

Hmmmm so I personally don’t agree with all of that.

*Let’s read what a Naturopath says*

Adrenal Fatigue Explained

By Catherine Clinton, ND, Clinic of Natural Medicine

Questions about fatigue are some of the most common that naturopathic physicians hear from patients. We all become run-down now and then due to the stresses of everyday life and the demands of our busy schedules. Over extended periods this can overburden our bodies, creating a situation that’s not so easy to bounce back from. In particular the adrenal glands, being in charge of the release of various stress hormones, can become exhausted and unable to effectively do their job. This is referred to as “adrenal fatigue.” When this happens our fatigue can become chronic and be joined by other symptoms such as pain and inflammation.

The adrenal glands have many functions, including the secretion of cortisol and other hormones in response to stress. Stress can come from an emotional trigger like a fight with a loved one, trouble at work or a physical trigger like an injury or motor vehicle accident. When prompted by pain or inflammation cortisol is released from the adrenal glands into the blood. Cortisol modifies the inflammatory pathways resulting in a decrease in inflammation and pain. When a drop in blood sugar occurs cortisol is secreted to help balance the levels of sugar in the blood. Cortisol is also released from the adrenal glands in a 24 hour daily rhythm with a burst in the morning to help us awake and a decrease in the evening to help us sleep. When adrenal glands are required to secrete at high levels for extended periods of time due to prolonged stress, pain, or blood sugar imbalances, they can become fatigued or begin to secrete cortisol at lower levels. When this occurs it is common to see an increase in fatigue, pain and/or inflammation.

Naturopathic physicians usually test adrenal function with a salivary cortisol test. From this test naturopaths can effectively diagnose and treat adrenal issues. Some common treatments for the adrenal glands include:

• Rhodiola: This botanical has been extensively researched in Russia for its ability to increase physical stamina and increase the body’s resistance to stress. It is categorized as an adaptogen by Russian researchers due to its observed ability to increase resistance to a variety of chemical, biological, and physical stressors. Naturopathic doctors use it in adrenal fatigue treatments to combat stress and increase energy.

• Ginseng: The three ginsengs; Siberian, American and Asian, are all used to treat adrenal issues. Research shows that they increase energy, stamina, and reduce stress. A recent study in 2003 demonstrated how ginseng can effectively help to maintain healthy blood sugar levels as well.

• Stress management: With adrenal issues stress management is vital to any treatment. Proper sleep, stress reduction techniques such as deep breathing or meditation and exercise can all increase the body’s ability to handle stress.

• Nutrition/Blood sugar regulation: Eating a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes that provides antioxidants and nutrients is essential for adrenal health. The adrenal glands need a good diet rich in B vitamins, vitamin C, zinc and magnesium. Eating quality protein at each meal allows the body to maintain healthy levels of blood sugar without taxing the adrenals. Treating adrenal fatigue must address the diet and nutrition of the patient.

Addressing adrenal issues can have profound effects in patient’s lives. As with any medical treatment you should contact your local naturopathic physician to receive a treatment plan that fits your individual needs.

•Adrenal Fatigue

by Jennifer Abercrombie ND | Mar 11, 2013 | Articles By Our Doctors |

Do you feel exhausted in the morning or all day long, gain weight despite good diet and exercise habits, have difficulty sleeping, can’t get through the day without caffeine, have chronic gastrointestinal infections, retain excess water, have difficulty concentrating, suffer from multiple allergies, feel run down or worn out, have heart palpitations, or experience severe PMS? All of these can be caused by adrenal fatigue.

What are the adrenals?

You have probably heard about the adrenals as they are getting a lot of press lately, and for good reason. The adrenals are a big regulator in the body. They control stress and inflammation; they release hormones that control blood pressure (aldosterone), and DHEA and pregnenolone that convert to cortisol and sex hormones. Our bodies are designed as if we were still living in the era of cavemen. The stress response is designed to be a fight or flight response. Imagine you were just seen by a tiger in the wilderness, your adrenals release a relatively short burst of adrenaline that gives you heightened awareness and prepares your body to start springing if needed. But adrenaline is short lived in the blood so the adrenals then release cortisol to give you the capability to have a longer sustained muscle capacity and mental acuity to evade the tiger. Because the release of adrenaline and cortisol dramatically affect all systems in the body for the goal of saving your life from an acute threat, the body requires a period of rest and relaxation for the stress response to relax and for normal physiology to resume. This system isn’t created for the modern era where we have consistent stressors on a daily basis that do not allow the stress response to relax and recover.

What is “stress”?

Stress is more than just emotional and psychological. It can be physical such as inflammation, environmental toxins, and infections (viral or bacterial). Triggers for creating a stress response results from a poor diet that is high in simple carbohydrates and sugars, low or high blood sugar, lack of sleep, lack of exercise, menopause or andropause, environmental toxins, hormonal birth control, long term steroid use (they suppress the adrenals), street drugs, consistent stimulant use (coffee), hypothyroid state, and genetics. If your parents at conception had depleted adrenals and especially if your mother had adrenal dysfunction while she was carrying you in utero, you may be predisposed to having adrenal issues.

When stress becomes chronic

If any of the stressors become chronic and persist without giving the adrenals and the body a chance to recover, a sustained amount of cortisol is released. Too much cortisol suppresses the immune system. This is a natural defense as you don’t want to be exerting precious energy to fight off a viral infection while you are running away from the tiger.  The side effect is that you are left more susceptible to infection. When the stress stays for weeks to months, cortisol starts to get depleted as your adrenals burn through the nutrients that make cortisol. Too little cortisol from exhaustion, allows the immune system to run unchecked, resulting in increased inflammation. A heightened state of inflammation is implicated in advanced aging, hypertension, irritable bowel disease, high cholesterol, heart disease, depression, chronic disease, any autoimmune disease triggers, progressing cancers, and it creates a rocky transition into menopause.

Basic Treatments

Because everyone is an individual and the factors that create adrenal fatigue are a unique combination for each person, there is no one perfect treatment. Each person is going to require a different treatment plan. With that said, here are some basics:

• A modified GAPS/Paleo/Anti-Inflammatory diet that is specific to you

• Minimize simple carbohydrates, sugar, caffeine, and recreational drugs. Marijuana may relax you, but when used for stress management you don’t learn how to process stress properly and may become dependent on it and use it as a crutch.
• B Vitamins: whole grains, beans, peas, nuts, dark leafy greens
• Vitamin C: Fruits and veggies, especially papaya, cantaloupe, strawberries, bell peppers, broccoli, tomatoes, dark leafy greens
• Magnesium: Dark leafy greens, whole grains, nuts, seeds, legumes
• Zinc: Meats, seafood, poultry, pumpkin and sesame seeds, nuts, whole grains
• Fat: Good fat (including saturated fat) is needed to make cholesterol which makes DHEA, pregnenolone, and cortisol. Good sources are: organic meats, coconut oil, nuts, seeds, organic unsalted butter, avocado, and olive oil
• Water: Stay hydrated with clean, filtered water
• Sleep: A regular, consistent sleep pattern
• Light and exercise: Go outside, feel the sunshine, and to move the body
• Re-assess: Re-evaluate the stress in your life and any negative relationships. Find out how you can make changes to lower stress
• Connect with others: Foster and build strong, supportive relationships in your life
• Don’t over do it: Even when you are starting to feel strong, don’t burn yourself out with too many daily tasks, too much on the social calendar, or over-exercising
• Release: Find a way to release your stress. Examples include meditation, journaling, hiking, surfing, beach combing, walking barefoot in the sand, etc.

What bothers me the most is that MDs think that Naturopathic medicine is new , however most people don’t understand how long it’s been around.

I will write in this in the next few days.

Reference links

http://www.nawellness.com/adrenal-fatigue/

https://www.naturopathic.org/content.asp?contentid=314

https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/adrenal-fatigue-is-it-real

Posted in Ahlbacks Disease, Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, BreakThroughCrew, Cancer, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Coping with Stress, Disclaimer, Ease your Stress, Energy, Happiness, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, Pain, Sleep Better, Thoughts, Uncategorized

Relax and Help Pain & Anxiety Through Various Techniques

I used to be stressed all the time. Especially when trying to manage life with one or two chronic conditions.

Now it’s occasional stress and pain all depends…..

But I have found some relief and I believe it’s because I have learned to relax using a variety of methods. My favorite is breathing 4-7-8 I read about this from Dr Andrew Weil .

This is followed by the five-step procedure listed below:

1 Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound.

2 Close your mouth and inhale quietly through your nose to a mental count of four.

3 Hold your breath for a count of seven.

4 Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound to a count of eight.

5 This is one breath. Now inhale again and repeat the cycle three more times for a total of four breaths.

Dr Andrew Weil emphasizes the most important part of this process is holding your breath for eight seconds. This is because keeping the breath in will allow oxygen to fill your lungs and then circulate throughout the body. It is this that produces a relaxing effect in the body.

I personally find it relaxing and you can use it anytime you feel stress and or anxiety.

I’ve tried a few things and this is the topic for today.

Daily I use

I use breathing 4-7-8i

I also am grateful for everything

Weekly

EFT Tapping (more about that below)

I also practice mindful meditation a few days a week when I walk especially.

I want to share with you ways that helped me, and maybe they can help you.

Make sure you get the ok from your doctor before starting anything new.

Relaxation Techniques
Using the Relaxation Response to Relieve Stress

For many of us, relaxation means zoning out in front of the TV at the end of a stressful day. But this does little to reduce the damaging effects of stress that add to disease and poor health. To effectively combat stress, we need to activate our body’s natural relaxation response.

You can do this by learning and practicing relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation, rhythmic exercise, and yoga.

Adding one or all of these activities into your life can help really reduce your everyday stress, and it will boost your mood, and improve your mental focus and physical health.

What is the relaxation response?
When stress overwhelms your nervous system, your body is flooded with chemicals that prepare you for “fight or flight.

Your stress response can be lifesaving in emergency situations where you need to act quickly. But when it’s constantly activated by the stresses of everyday life, it can wear your body down and take a toll on your-health both physical and emotional.

I was at my Naturopath’s a few months ago and she did what she called tapping. I felt this sense of peace and relief, like a huge weight was lifted from my shoulder.

If you’re like me and many other people, you feel trapped, whether it’s due to daily stress , work or school stress, family stress , stress that comes with having a chronic condition etc…we all can get caught in this cycle. The Stress Cycle

You’re tired of feeling sad, depressed, anxious, discontent, and unwell. You’re sick of the expensive and ineffective treatments. You’re fed up with relinquishing the power over your health and happiness to doctors.

You want to be your best, living a life that is filled with peacefulness, joy, and fulfillment, from day to day and moment to moment.

Tapping

Meditation

Yoga

Deep Breathing

These can all help I will post some links below to help you learn more.

No one can avoid all stress, but you can learn to how to counteract its detrimental effects in the body mind and spirit.

The relaxation response puts the brakes on stress and brings your body and mind back into a state of equilibrium.

When the relaxation response is activated, your:
heart rate slows down
breathing becomes slower and deeper
blood pressure drops or stabilizes
muscles relax
blood flow to the brain increases

In addition to its calming physical effects, the relaxation response also increases energy and focus, combats illness, relieves aches and pains, heightens problem-solving abilities, and boosts motivation and productivity. Best of all, anyone can reap these benefits with regular practice.

There is no single relaxation technique that is best for everyone. The right relaxation technique is the one that resonates with you, fits your lifestyle, and is able to focus your mind and interrupt your everyday thoughts to elicit the relaxation response.

You may even find that alternating or combining different techniques provide the best results.
How you react to stress may also influence the relaxation technique that works best for you:

The “fight” response. If you tend to become angry, agitated, or keyed up under stress, you may respond best to stress relief activities that quiet you down, such as meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, deep breathing, or guided imagery.

The “flight” response. If you tend to become depressed, withdrawn, or spaced out under stress, you may respond best to stress relief activities that areenergize your nervous system, such as rhythmic exercise, massage, mindfulness, or power yoga.

The immobilization response. If you’ve experienced some type of trauma and tend to “freeze” or become “stuck” under stress, your challenge is to first rouse your nervous system to a fight or flight response (above) so you can employ the applicable stress relief techniques. To do this, choose physical activity that engages both your arms and legs, such as running, dancing, or tai chi, and perform it mindfully, focusing on the sensations in your limbs as you move.

Deep breathing
With its focus on full, cleansing breaths, deep breathing is a simple yet powerful relaxation technique. It’s easy to learn, can be practiced almost anywhere, and provides a quick way to get your stress levels in check. Deep breathing is the cornerstone of many other relaxation practices, too, and can be combined with other relaxing elements such as aromatherapy and music. All you really need is a few minutes and a place to stretch out.

How to practice deep breathing

The key to deep breathing is to breathe deeply from the abdomen, getting as much fresh air as possible in your lungs. When you take deep breaths from the abdomen, rather than shallow breaths from your upper chest, you inhale more oxygen. The more oxygen you get, the less tense, short of breath, and anxious you feel.
Sit comfortably with your back straight. Put one hand on your chest and the other on your stomach.
Breathe in through your nose. The hand on your stomach should rise. The hand on your chest should move very little.
Exhale through your mouth, pushing out as much air as you can while contracting your abdominal muscles. The hand on your stomach should move in as you exhale, but your other hand should move very little.
Continue to breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth. Try to inhale enough so that your lower abdomen rises and falls. Count slowly as you exhale.
If you find it difficult breathing from your abdomen while sitting up, try lying down. Put a small book on your stomach, and breathe so that the book rises as you inhale and falls as you exhale.

Mindfulness meditation
Rather than worrying about the future or dwelling on the past, mindfulness meditation switches the focus to what’s happening right now, enabling you to be fully engaged in the present moment.

By focusing your attention on a single repetitive action, such as your breathing, other forms of mindfulness meditation encourage you to follow and then release internal thoughts or sensations. Mindfulness can also be applied to activities such as walking, exercising, or eating.
A basic mindfulness exercise:
1. Sit on a straight-backed chair or cross-legged on the floor.
2. Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling.
3. Once you’ve narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations, and thoughts.
4. Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.

Rhythmic movement and mindful exercise
The idea of exercising may not sound particularly soothing, but rhythmic exercise that gets you into a flow of repetitive movement can be very relaxing. Examples include:
Running
Walking
Swimming
Dancing
Rowing
Climbing
For maximum stress relief, add mindfulness to your workout
While simply engaging in rhythmic exercise will help you relieve stress, if you add a mindfulness component on top, you’ll get even more benefit.
As with meditation, mindful exercise requires being fully engaged in the present moment—paying attention to how your body feels right now, rather than your daily worries or concerns. In order to “turn off” your thoughts, focus on the sensations in your limbs and how your breathing complements your movement.
If you’re walking or running, for example, focus on the sensation of your feet touching the ground, the rhythm of your breath, and the feeling of the wind against your face. If your mind wanders to other thoughts, gently return to focusing on your breathing and movement.
Visualization
Visualization, or guided imagery, is a variation on traditional meditation that involves imagining a scene in which you feel at peace, free to let go of all tension and anxiety. Choose whatever setting is most calming to you, whether it’s a tropical beach, a favorite childhood spot, or a quiet wooded glen.
You can practice visualization on your own or with a therapist (or an audio recording of a therapist) guiding you through the imagery. You can also choose to do your visualization in silence or use listening aids, such as soothing music or a sound machine or recording that matches your chosen setting—the sound of ocean waves if you’ve chosen a beach, for example.
Practicing visualization
Close your eyes and imagine your restful place. Picture it as vividly as you can—everything you can see, hear, smell, taste, and feel.

Just “looking” at it like you would a photograph is not enough. Visualization works best if you incorporate as many sensory details as possible.
For example, if you are thinking about a dock on a quiet lake:
See the rise or set
Hear the birds singing
Smell the pine trees
Feel the cool water on your bare feet
Taste the fresh, clean air
Enjoy the feeling of your worries drifting away as you slowly explore your restful place. When you are ready, gently open your eyes and come back to the present.
Don’t worry if you sometimes zone out or lose track of where you are during a visualization session. This is normal. You may also experience feelings of heaviness in your limbs, muscle twitches, or yawning. Again, these are normal responses.
Yoga and tai chi
Yoga involves a series of both moving and stationary poses, combined with deep breathing. As well as reducing anxiety and stress, yoga can also improve flexibility, strength, balance, and stamina. Since injuries can happen when yoga is practiced incorrectly, it’s best to learn by attending group classes, hiring a private teacher, or at least following video instructions. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others, tailoring your practice as you see fit.

If you’re unsure whether a specific yoga class is appropriate for stress relief, call the studio or ask the teacher.
Tai chi
If you’ve seen a group of people in the park slowly moving in synch, you’ve probably witnessed tai chi. Tai chi is a self-paced, non-competitive series of slow, flowing body movements. By focusing your mind on the movements and your breathing, you keep your attention on the present, which clears the mind and leads to a relaxed state.
Tai chi is a safe, low-impact option for people of all ages and fitness levels, including older adults and those recovering from injuries. As with yoga, it’s best learned in a class or from a private instructor. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others.
Self-massage
You’re probably already aware how much a professional massage at a spa or health club can help reduce stress, relieve pain, and ease muscle tension. What you may not be aware of is that you can experience many of the same benefits at home or work by practicing self-massage—or trading massages with a loved one.
Try taking a few minutes to massage yourself at your desk between tasks, on the couch at the end of a hectic day, or in bed to help you unwind before sleep. To enhance relaxation, you can use aromatic oil, scented lotion, or combine self-message with mindfulness or deep breathing techniques.

Start a regular relaxation practice
Learning the basics of these relaxation techniques takes regular practice to truly harness their stress-relieving power.

Most stress experts recommend setting aside at least 10 to 20 minutes a day for your relaxation practice I mean we surely can find 10 minutes….If you’d like to maximize the benefits, work toward 30 minutes to an hour…I am still working on this myself. I’m good for 15 minutes.

Tips for making relaxation techniques part of your life
Set aside time in your daily schedule. If possible, schedule a set time once or twice a day for your practice.

If your schedule is already packed, remember that many relaxation techniques can be practiced while you’re doing other things.

Try meditating while commuting on the bus or train, taking a yoga or tai chi break at lunchtime, or practicing mindful walking while exercising your dog.

Just don’t practice this stuff when you’re sleepy. These techniques are so relaxing that they can make you very sleepy I have fallen asleep many times when learning to meditate or use sounds to help me relax.

However, you will get the most benefit if you practice when you’re fully alert.

Expect ups and downs. Don’t be discouraged if you skip a few days or even a few weeks. Just keep trying.

If you exercise, improve the relaxation benefits by adopting mindfulness, try focusing your attention on your body. If you’re resistance training, for example, focus on coordinating your breathing with your movements and pay attention to how your body feels.

Now tapping this provides relief from chronic pain, emotional problems, disorders, addictions, phobias, post traumatic stress disorder, and physical diseases. I read Tapping is newly set to revolutionize the field of health and wellness, the healing concepts that it’s based upon have been in practice in Eastern medicine for over 5,000 years.

Like acupuncture and acupressure, Tapping is a set of techniques which utilize the body’s energy meridian points. You can stimulate these meridian points by tapping on them with your fingertips – literally tapping into your body’s own energy and healing power.

The basic technique requires you to focus on the negative emotion at hand: a fear or anxiety, a bad memory, an unresolved problem, or anything that’s bothering you. While maintaining your mental focus on this issue, use your fingertips to tap 5-7 times each on 12 of the body’s meridian points.

Tapping on these meridian points – while concentrating on accepting and resolving the negative emotion – will access your body’s energy, restoring it to a balanced state.

You may be wondering about these meridians.

Put simply, energy circulates through your body along a specific network of channels. You can tap into this energy at any point along the system.

This concept comes from the doctrines of traditional Chinese medicine, which referred to the body’s energy as “ch’i.” In ancient times, the Chinese discovered 100 meridian points. They also discovered that by stimulating these meridian points, they could heal.

Call it energy, call it the Source, call it life force, call it ch’i… Whatever you want to call it, it works.

In some ways, Tapping is similar to acupuncture.

Like Tapping, acupuncture achieves healing through stimulating the body’s meridians and energy flow.

However, unlike Tapping, acupuncture involves needles! “No needles” is definitely one of the advantages of Tapping.

Here is a video of how to begin tapping to ease pain another video is to help anxiety

For Pain Relief. https://youtu.be/5hYE0Wt4Sxs,

https://youtu.be/tQRQn1NpkzA ,

Tapping PainRelief

Pain relief Tap version 2

All About EFT Tapping https://youtu.be/ZfZBHWSbrsg

Tapping helps to heal-many parts of your life TEDx

TEDx Tapping https://youtu.be/ZfZBHWSbrsg

Some other links for meditation

Meditation For Pain https://youtu.be/r3qBlVfPzXo

Tibetan Sounds Meditation https://youtu.be/RgqxZU6_qOY

Help chronic pain and disease https://youtu.be/gaY4m00wXpw

Yoga for beginners with disabilities Yoga if disabled https://youtu.be/tyeMFy9KkTY

Posted in Awareness, Happiness, Meditation, Mindfulness, Opinions, Positivity, Women

Women Wage Peace October 8, 2017

The most important thing is that everyone is aware of the day being a World Meditation Day with people meditating all around the world at this day. Be it at the same global time, or different times during the 24 hour period. If you don’t sit in meditation you can spend the time sending love and positive feelings to your surroundings.

You can use the guided audio meditation if you like.

when

Anytime during the Sunday is fine. This means we will be meditating on different times during that day, but we will create a ‘meditation wave’ where one timezone takes over for the next. 24 hours of meditation! Every Sunday!

where

Your home, outside, your office, a church, a mosque, a classroom,  wherever you are.

with

Your group, your Self, friends, family, collegues, anyone.

how

By positively visualize and meditate upon a world of sharing and caring, with conscious and compassionate people. By beaming our Love into the world.

Sit in meditation for 30 minutes or more, or as much as you have time for.

You can even meditate the whole day by being mindful about everything you do and aware of the joy in your heart and beam this joy into the world.

Posted in Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Diagnosed, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Gluten Free, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, OA, Osteonecrosis, Rosacea, StopTheClot, Support Group, Hope, Uncategorized

My Sleeping Giant Called Chronic Pain.

Not everyone knows what it is like to suddenly one day be told by a doctor you will have chronic pain for probably the rest if your life.
I've been blessed with a few painful diagnosis, I say blessed because I know I will help others because of my diagnosis.

Osteoarthritis 2010
Osteonecrosis 2014
Spondylolisthesis 2016
Hypothyroidism 2002
Rosecea 2017

Shock is one of the best words I can use to describe how I felt when that happened to me.

Today I discuss Osteonecrosis

When I began facing the symptoms of Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis , I was in shock the day I was diagnosed.
I just couldn't believe that a torn meniscus could lead me down this path.

One day I was fine and then the next day, I was in my bed due to intense debilitating pain.
I had a job as an optometric tech/optician that I loved.
I just never knew I would encounter something so life changing all because of a torn meniscus that ended up with me having AVN/ON.

I pictured myself being at my job for a long time, I want to retire at 59 not 51 and certainly not because I had to.

I felt as if this rare disease/disorder called Osteonecrosis had drastically altered my vision and goals and my future career.
I began to feel uncertain about my life and the plans I was making for it. My anxiety seemed to be off the chart.

When someone tells you that Osteonecrosis is bone death all you seem to hear , at least in my case is death.
My heart raced, thoughts of being in a wheelchair flashed in my mind.
This went on for a few weeks to maybe a few months.
I had to get a grip and come to terms with this. Even though my family and friends were supportive I felt terribly alone.

No one really knew how I felt and words couldn't describe that constant pain I was in.
I often refer to it as being hit by a hot lightening bolt over and over.

I woke up one day after my torn meniscus ended up with me developing Osteonecrosis and could barely walk and I could not focus when people were talking to me because my mind kept jumping around trying to figure out what I could do to help myself. How can I get some of my life back, how to get this pain to ease or just go away.
I want to get back to things I love like work, walking and hiking, living.

Through trial and error I learned what to do and what not to do for the most part. But I still get days even weeks where the pain returns to let me know it's still there, lurking like a stalker in the background.

My AVN/ON is better some days than others. The first 2 years honestly was constant pain 24/7 it was so bad I couldn't work anymore. I could not go up steps period. I could barely function.
I wasn't one to take pain pills all the time, even though I had them.
I asked my ortho for alternative ideas
He suggested CuraMed.

I started to take Terry's Naturally CuraMed 375 mg a day x 2 a day for the first week , then once a day since.

As well as Vitamin D because I was severely deficient,and a few other medications that was prescribed by my doctors.

I was taking all the other supplements before the CuraMed and honestly with in 2 weeks my pain eased up enough to notice. It was still there but not as severe.

I also read about raw and plant based food to help the pain. Amazing..

Then after about a month there were days I had very little pain ,pain still present like a dull ache and I was so thrilled to be able to at least go to the grocery store and come home and not cry or feel defeated.

I had to have a umbilical Hernia repaired and was told stop all Supplements!
I wasn't thrilled about this but understand why.

With in 3 days of not taking my supplements my pain comes back with vengeance .
Are you kidding me?!

I hate that I am unable to predict it. After a 3 years of enduring this pain off and on I am still amazed at how rapidly my condition can change.

I take my supplements everyday but sometimes the pain does put me in check. It yells HEY LADY…..
I'm still here.

Yesterday I had a flare up the pain was overwhelming so frustrating.
I'm still in pain today just not as bad as yesterday.
When I limp it throws off everything and then the Spondylolisthesis in my L5 starts acting up. I get numb when I sit. So some kind of nerve issues happening.But ya know I don't even worry about that right now.

The pain is like a sleeping giant. You never know when the beast will awaken. But look the frick out when it does.

Besides physical pain also can come body image issues, due to limited mobility and possible weight gain or loss with a chronic condition.

Limited mobility and those who have to take medications just to be able to survive takes a toll on your weight. Be it steroids which is horrible for people with AVN in fact it's been known to cause AVN . I am grateful that my avn/on was due to trauma.

I gained weight because I'm not anywhere near as active as I was yes I changed my diet but still the body has to move, and in my opinion prolonged use of any rx or supplements can have a big effect on a persons weight. Plus I have Hypothyroidism which has its own set of issues.

But because of AVN/ON , exercise may be limited or barely exist, because sometimes just getting out of bed in the morning feels like you just climbed for days in the Appalachian mountains. I have learned that no matter how much pain I'm in , I have to move some or I will feel worse.

Unfortunately mood swings can happen especially if pain is severe and often debilitating. It really sucks.

You can feel it like a light switch inside you clicks.
But 10 min later if pain is gone or subsided you can be relaxed and happy.

I really hate pain. And I hate feeling moody I like to be happy.

I started keeping a combination food/pain diary.

My food/pain diary is used to monitor levels of pain over a an extended period of time to see if I had possible triggers for my pain.

I know it might sound very weird and kind of scientific, but just think about it,say last week you had intense pain and then it was gone and say you ate a different food maybe there's a correlation between the two.

If you have a condition where you experience pain off and on for weeks or months,years you will remember that pain on January 1 or July 28th.

So if you keep a food/ pain log maybe the pain is brought on by an allergic reaction to something in a particular food.

Then you know to stay away from it.

I'm not saying it's 100 percent accurate but for me it's helped tremendously.
However somedays my body just has pain especially winter months. I used to love winter now I dread it.

Speaking of cold,I also have this freezing cold feeling in the knee that has the Osteonecrosis in it.

It feels like it's always cold , but when it really hurts it feels like it's been outside on a cold Ohio day for about 3 hours in 10 degree weather.
And the only relief I get is propping it up and applying a ThermaCare heat wrap.

That's why I track my pain , food, weather. I look for triggers.

I will post my pain tracker sheet tomorrow.

What is Avascular Necrosis/Osteonecrosis?

Osteonecrosis is a disease caused by reduced blood flow to bones in the joints. With too little blood, the bone starts to die and may break down.
Osteonecrosis is also known as:
• Avascular necrosis
• Aseptic necrosis
• Ischemic necrosis.
Osteonecrosis is most often found in the hips, knees, shoulders, and ankles. You may have osteonecrosis in one or more bones.

In people with healthy bones, new bone is always replacing old bone. This process keeps bones strong and also happens when children grow or if a bone is injured.

In osteonecrosis, bone breaks down faster than the body can make enough strong, new bone. If you do not get treatment, the disease worsens and the bones in the joints break down.

You may not be able to bend or move the affected joint very well, and you may have pain in the joint.

Who Gets Osteonecrosis?
Osteonecrosis can occur in people of any age, but it is most common in people in their thirties, forties, and fifties.
What Causes Osteonecrosis?
Osteonecrosis is caused when the blood flow to the bone decreases, but why this happens is not always clear. Some known causes of osteonecrosis are:
• Steroid medications
• Alcohol use
• Injury
• Increased pressure inside the bone.
Risk factors for osteonecrosis are:
• Radiation treatment
• Chemotherapy
•. Smoking
• Kidney and other organ transplants.
Osteonecrosis is more common in people with illnesses such as:
• Cancer
• Lupus
• HIV
• Gaucher’s disease
• Caisson disease
• Gout
• Vasculitis
• Osteoarthritis
• Osteoporosis
•. Pregnancy
•. Blood disorders Like Factor V Leiden, Factor Viii, and Sickle Cell disease.

Osteonecrosis can also affect people for no known reason, even if they have no other health problems.
What Are the Symptoms of Osteonecrosis?
When osteonecrosis first begins, you may not have any symptoms. You may start to feel pain when you put weight on a joint with osteonecrosis. As the disease gets worse, you may have more pain and the joint may hurt even when you rest. Pain may be mild or severe.
If the bone and joint start to break down, you may have severe pain and not be able to use the joint. For instance, if you have osteonecrosis in the hip, you may not be able to walk. The time from the start of symptoms to losing use of the joint can range from months to more than a year.
How Is Osteonecrosis Diagnosed?
To diagnose osteonecrosis, your doctor will take your medical history and do a physical exam. Your doctor may then order one or more tests to see which bones are affected:
• X ray
• Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
• Computed tomography (CT) scan
• Bone scan
• Bone biopsy
• Measure of the pressure inside the bone.
Treatment helps more if the disease is diagnosed early.
How is Osteonecrosis Treated?
Treatment helps to keep bone in joints from breaking down. Without treatment, most people with the disease will have severe pain and limited movement within 2 years. To decide on the best treatment, your doctor will find out:
• Your age
• The stage of the disease
• Where and how much bone has osteonecrosis
• The cause, if known. If the cause is steroid or alcohol use, treatment may not work unless you stop using those substances.
The goals in treating osteonecrosis are:
• To improve use of the joint
• To stop further damage
• To protect bones and joints.
For early stage disease, doctors may first order nonsurgical treatments. If they do not help, surgery may be needed.
Nonsurgical treatments
Nonsurgical treatments may relieve pain in the short term, but they do not cure the disease. One or more of these treatments may be used at the same time.
• Medications. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to reduce pain and swelling. For people with blood clotting problems, blood thinners may be used to prevent clots that block the blood supply to the bone. If you take steroid medications, cholesterol-lowering drugs may be used to reduce fat in the blood.
• Taking weight off the joint. Your doctor may suggest that you limit your activity or use crutches to take weight off the affected joint. This may slow bone damage and allow some healing. If combined with NSAIDs, it may help you avoid or delay surgery.
• Range-of-motion exercises. Exercise of the joints with osteonecrosis may help increase their range of motion.
• Electrical stimulation. Research has shown that this can prompt bone growth.
•Prp injections and or stem cell injections A2M or prolotherapy in early stages 1 -2.
StemCell Stage 3 as long as bone has not collapsed
Surgery
In time, most people with osteonecrosis need surgery. There are four main types of surgery used for osteonecrosis. Your doctor will decide if you need surgery and what type is best for you.
• Core decompression surgery. Lowers pressure inside the bone to increase blood flow to the bone.
• Osteotomy. Reshapes the bone to reduce stress on the damaged joint.
• Bone graft. Takes healthy bone from one part of the body and uses it to replace diseased bone.
• Total joint replacement. Replaces the joint with a manmade one.

ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com

Posted in Arthritis, AtomicBlonde, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Cardiovascular, Chronic Pain, Diagnosed, Disclaimer, Eat Healthy, exercise, Factor V Leiden, Food, Hacks, Happiness, Herbal, Inflammation, Life, Meditation, Mindfulness, Music, OA, Osteonecrosis, Positivity, Uncategorized, Vision

Various Relaxation Techniques

See full Disclaimer at bottom
of the post

Here is a partial
Disclaimer
Usage Policy

The information provided on this website is for educational purposes only. By using the website you are participating at your own risk.

With so much stress that comes with having a chronic condition and the world we live in is full of several fast paced situations , hurry here, hurry there , doctor appointments, tests,people with little to no patience and they want us to move a bit faster!
Excuse You! But I have a bone disease and I am going as fast as I can.
People judging us
It can be overwhelming
It's no wonder at the end of a day we can't sleep.

I think personally everyone needs to learn how to just open our mind relax and chill a little.

Relaxation Techniques
Using the Relaxation Response to Relieve Stress

For many of us, relaxation means zoning out in front of the TV at the end of a stressful day.

But this does little to reduce the damaging effects of stress.

To effectively combat stress, we need to activate the body's natural relaxation response.
You can do this by practicing relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation, rhythmic exercise, and yoga or chair yoga if you are challenged with Bone and joint issues.

Fitting these activities into your life can help reduce everyday stress, boost your energy and mood, and improve your mental and physical health..

What is the relaxation response? Well based on what I have read …
When stress overwhelms your nervous system, your body is flooded with chemicals that prepare you for "fight or flight."
This stress response can be lifesaving in emergency situations where you need to act quickly.
But when it’s constantly activated by the stresses of everyday life, it can wear your body down and take a toll on your emotional health.

No one can avoid all stress, but you can counteract its detrimental effects by learning how to produce the relaxation response, a state of deep rest that is the polar opposite of the stress response. The relaxation response puts the brakes on stress and brings your body and mind back into a state of equilibrium.
When the relaxation response is activated, your:
heart rate slows down
breathing becomes slower and deeper
blood pressure drops or stabilizes
muscles relax
blood flow to the brain increases

In addition to its calming physical effects, the relaxation response also increases energy and focus, combats illness, relieves aches and pains, heightens problem-solving abilities, and boosts motivation and productivity. Best of all, anyone can reap these benefits with regular practice.
How to produce the relaxation response
Simply laying on the couch, reading, or watching TV while sometimes relaxing isn’t going to produce the physical and psychological benefits of the relaxation response. For that, you’ll need to actively practice a relaxation technique.
Finding the relaxation technique that’s best for you may be interesting because there is no single relaxation technique that is best for everyone.
So I am going to touch base on a few and post their YouTube links below.

The right relaxation technique is the one that resonates with you, fits your lifestyle, and is able to focus your mind and interrupt your everyday thoughts to elicit the relaxation response. You may even find that alternating or combining different techniques provide the best results.

How you react to stress may also influence the relaxation technique that works best for you:

The “fight” response. If you tend to become angry, agitated, or keyed up under stress, you will respond best to stress relief activities that quiet you down, such as meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, deep breathing, or guided imagery.
The “flight” response. If you tend to become depressed, withdrawn, or spaced out under stress, you will respond best to stress relief activities that are stimulating and energize your nervous system, such as rhythmic exercise, massage, mindfulness, or power yoga.

The immobilization response. If you’ve experienced some type of trauma and tend to “freeze” or become “stuck” under stress, your challenge is to first rouse your nervous system to a fight or flight response (above) so you can employ the applicable stress relief techniques.
To do this, choose physical activity that engages both your arms and legs, such as running, dancing, or tai chi, and perform it mindfully, focusing on the sensations in your limbs as you move.

Deep breathing
With its focus on full, cleansing breaths, deep breathing is a simple yet powerful relaxation technique. It’s easy to learn, can be practiced almost anywhere, and provides a quick way to get your stress levels in check. Deep breathing is the cornerstone of many other relaxation practices, too, and can be combined with other relaxing elements such as aromatherapy and music. All you really need is a few minutes and a place to stretch out.
How to practice deep breathing
The key to deep breathing is to breathe deeply from the abdomen, getting as much fresh air as possible in your lungs. When you take deep breaths from the abdomen, rather than shallow breaths from your upper chest, you inhale more oxygen. The more oxygen you get, the less tense, short of breath, and anxious you feel.
Sit comfortably with your back straight. Put one hand on your chest and the other on your stomach.
Breathe in through your nose. The hand on your stomach should rise. The hand on your chest should move very little.
Exhale through your mouth, pushing out as much air as you can while contracting your abdominal muscles. The hand on your stomach should move in as you exhale, but your other hand should move very little.
Continue to breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth. Try to inhale enough so that your lower abdomen rises and falls. Count slowly as you exhale.

If you find it difficult breathing from your abdomen while sitting up, try lying down. Put a small book on your stomach, and breathe so that the book rises as you inhale and falls as you exhale.

Progressive muscle relaxation
Progressive muscle relaxation is a two-step process in which you systematically tense and relax different muscle groups in the body. With regular practice, it gives you an intimate familiarity with what tension as well as complete relaxation feels like in different parts of the body. This can help you to you react to the first signs of the muscular tension that accompanies stress. And as your body relaxes, so will your mind.

Progressive muscle relaxation can be combined with deep breathing for additional stress relief.
Practicing progressive muscle relaxation
Consult with your doctor first if you have a history of muscle spasms, back problems, or other serious injuries that may be aggravated by tensing muscles.
Start at your feet and work your way up to your face, trying to only tense those muscles intended.
1. Loosen clothing, take off your shoes, and get comfortable.
2. Take a few minutes to breathe in and out in slow, deep breaths.
3. When you’re ready, shift your attention to your right foot. Take a moment to focus on the way it feels.
4. Slowly tense the muscles in your right foot, squeezing as tightly as you can. Hold for a count of 10.
5. Relax your foot. Focus on the tension flowing away and how your foot feels as it becomes limp and loose.
6. Stay in this relaxed state for a moment, breathing deeply and slowly.
7. Shift your attention to your left foot. Follow the same sequence of muscle tension and release.
8. Move slowly up through your body, contracting and relaxing the different muscle groups.
9. It may take some practice at first, but try not to tense muscles other than those intended.

Mindfulness meditation
Rather than worrying about the future or dwelling on the past, mindfulness meditation switches the focus to what’s happening right now, enabling you to be fully engaged in the present moment.

Meditations that cultivate mindfulness have long been used to reduce stress, anxiety, depression, and other negative emotions. Some of these meditations bring you into the present by focusing your attention on a single repetitive action, such as your breathing, a few repeated words, or the flickering light of a candle. Other forms of mindfulness meditation encourage you to follow and then release internal thoughts or sensations. Mindfulness can also be applied to activities such as walking, exercising, or eating.
A basic mindfulness exercise:
1. Sit on a straight-backed chair or cross-legged on the floor.
2. Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling.
3. Once you've narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations, and thoughts.
4. Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.

Body scan meditation
This is a type of meditation that that focuses your attention on various parts of your body. Like progressive muscle relaxation, you start with your feet and work your way up. But instead of tensing and relaxing muscles, you simply focus on the way each part of your body feels, without labeling the sensations as either “good” or “bad”.
Practicing body scan meditation
Lie on your back, legs uncrossed, arms relaxed at your sides, eyes open or closed. Focus on your breathing for about two minutes until you start to feel relaxed.
Turn your focus to the toes of your right foot. Notice any sensations you feel while continuing to also focus on your breathing. Imagine each deep breath flowing to your toes. Remain focused on this area for one to two minutes.
Move your focus to the sole of your right foot. Tune in to any sensations you feel in that part of your body and imagine each breath flowing from the sole of your foot. After one or two minutes, move your focus to your right ankle and repeat. Move to your calf, knee, thigh, hip, and then repeat the sequence for your left leg. From there, move up the torso, through the lower back and abdomen, the upper back and chest, and the shoulders. Pay close attention to any area of the body that causes you pain or discomfort.
After completing the body scan, relax for a while in silence and stillness, noting how your body feels. Then slowly open your eyes and stretch, if necessary.
Rhythmic movement and mindful exercise
The idea of exercising may not sound particularly soothing, but rhythmic exercise that gets you into a flow of repetitive movement can be very relaxing. Examples include:
Running
Walking
Swimming
Dancing
Rowing
Climbing
For maximum stress relief, add mindfulness to your workout
While simply engaging in rhythmic exercise will help you relieve stress, if you add a mindfulness component on top, you’ll get even more benefit.
As with meditation, mindful exercise requires being fully engaged in the present moment—paying attention to how your body feels right now, rather than your daily worries or concerns. In order to “turn off” your thoughts, focus on the sensations in your limbs and how your breathing complements your movement.
If you’re walking or running, for example, focus on the sensation of your feet touching the ground, the rhythm of your breath, and the feeling of the wind against your face. If your mind wanders to other thoughts, gently return to focusing on your breathing and movement.
Visualization
Visualization, or guided imagery, is a variation on traditional meditation that involves imagining a scene in which you feel at peace, free to let go of all tension and anxiety. Choose whatever setting is most calming to you, whether it’s a tropical beach, a favorite childhood spot, or a quiet wooded glen.
You can practice visualization on your own or with a therapist (or an audio recording of a therapist) guiding you through the imagery. You can also choose to do your visualization in silence or use listening aids, such as soothing music or a sound machine or recording that matches your chosen setting—the sound of ocean waves if you’ve chosen a beach, for example.
Practicing visualization
Close your eyes and imagine your restful place. Picture it as vividly as you can—everything you can see, hear, smell, taste, and feel. Just “looking” at it like you would a photograph is not enough. Visualization works best if you incorporate as many sensory details as possible.
For example, if you are thinking about a dock on a quiet lake:
See the sun setting over the water
Hear the birds singing
Smell the pine trees
Feel the cool water on your bare feet
Taste the fresh, clean air
Enjoy the feeling of your worries drifting away as you slowly explore your restful place. When you are ready, gently open your eyes and come back to the present.
Don't worry if you sometimes zone out or lose track of where you are during a visualization session. This is normal. You may also experience feelings of heaviness in your limbs, muscle twitches, or yawning. Again, these are normal responses.
Yoga and tai chi
Yoga involves a series of both moving and stationary poses, combined with deep breathing. As well as reducing anxiety and stress, yoga can also improve flexibility, strength, balance, and stamina. Since injuries can happen when yoga is practiced incorrectly, it’s best to learn by attending group classes, hiring a private teacher, or at least following video instructions. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others, tailoring your practice as you see fit.

If you’re unsure whether a specific yoga class is appropriate for stress relief, call the studio or ask the teacher.
Tai chi
If you’ve seen a group of people in the park slowly moving in synch, you’ve probably witnessed tai chi. Tai chi is a self-paced, non-competitive series of slow, flowing body movements. By focusing your mind on the movements and your breathing, you keep your attention on the present, which clears the mind and leads to a relaxed state.
Tai chi is a safe, low-impact option for people of all ages and fitness levels, including older adults and those recovering from injuries. As with yoga, it's best learned in a class or from a private instructor. Once you’ve learned the basics, you can practice alone or with others.
Self-massage
You’re probably already aware how much a professional massage at a spa or health club can help reduce stress, relieve pain, and ease muscle tension. What you may not be aware of is that you can experience many of the same benefits at home or work by practicing self-massage—or trading massages with a loved one.
Try taking a few minutes to massage yourself at your desk between tasks, on the couch at the end of a hectic day, or in bed to help you unwind before sleep. To enhance relaxation, you can use aromatic oil, scented lotion, or combine self-message with mindfulness or deep breathing techniques.

Starting a regular relaxation practice
Learning the basics of these relaxation techniques isn’t difficult, but it takes regular practice to truly harness their stress-relieving power. Most stress experts recommend setting aside at least 10 to 20 minutes a day for your relaxation practice. If you’d like to maximize the benefits, aim for 30 minutes to an hour.
Tips for making relaxation techniques part of your life
Set aside time in your daily schedule. If possible, schedule a set time once or twice a day for your practice. If your schedule is already packed, remember that many relaxation techniques can be practiced while you’re doing other things. Try meditating while commuting on the bus or train, taking a yoga or tai chi break at lunchtime, or practicing mindful walking while exercising your dog.
Don't practice when you're sleepy. These techniques are so relaxing that they can make you very sleepy. However, you will get the most benefit if you practice when you’re fully alert. Avoid practicing close to bedtime or after a heavy meal or alcohol.
Expect ups and downs. Don’t be discouraged if you skip a few days or even a few weeks. Just get started again and slowly build up to your old momentum.
If you exercise, improve the relaxation benefits by adopting mindfulness. Instead of zoning out or staring at a TV as you exercise, try focusing your attention on your body. If you’re resistance training, for example, focus on coordinating your breathing with your movements and pay attention to how your body feels as you raise and lower weights.

Here is a few links I use to
relax
reduce pain
help me sleep better

These are my favorites and I listen to it daily and a few I listen to now and then

Daily
Mindfulness
https://youtu.be/-2zdUXve6fQ

Stress Relief and Confidence
https://youtu.be/-KMngzCWgTw

Morning Meditation for Healing
https://youtu.be/q9ZR_CJhuLc

Reiki for pain relief
https://youtu.be/3nJtajgAb34

Relax Video Male Voice
https://youtu.be/_jD3VxSGM-k

https://youtu.be/oA_rY4N8XJA

Sounds for Anxiety depression
https://youtu.be/AmqDOA-JALg

Meditation Sounds for pain relief
https://youtu.be/XiNne25uMK8

To help you sleep
https://youtu.be/xQ6xgDI7Whc

Disclaimer
Usage Policy

The information provided on this website is for educational purposes only. By using the website you are participating at your own risk.
• Make sure you practise with enough free space around you. Wear comfortable clothing so you can move freely.
• Please take responsibility for your own body and include extra warm up and cool down stretches where appropriate.
• You should avoid alcohol and drugs before yoga and meditation. Also no heavy meals for two hours before practice. Keep yourself hydrated before and after your yoga practice.
• If you feel dizzy, light-headed, faint, or if you experience any other discomfort, stop exercising immediately and consult a medical doctor. You are responsible for your condition during your practice. Exercise within your limits. Never force or strain. Seek attention and advice as appropriate.
• We offer no medical advice. You should consult a medical practitioner before starting any new exercise regime. This is particularly important if you are overweight, pregnant, nursing, regularly taking medications, or have any existing medical conditions. This website may not be tailored to your current physical and mental health. We accept no liability whatsoever for any damages arising from the use of this website.
• We do not recommend that you attempt any of this or yoga exercises for the first time without suitable experience or supervision.
• While This website takes reasonable efforts to maintain this website in an accurate and up-to-date fashion it may contain some technical or other mistakes, inaccuracies or typographical errors. This website cannot be held responsible for any mistakes or omissions on this website.

Posted in Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Awareness, Blessed, Bone Health, Chronic Pain, Diagnosed, Eat Healthy, Factor V Leiden, Herbal, Inflammation, Meditation, Mindfulness, Osteonecrosis, Uncategorized

Learning To Live Mindfully When You Have A Chronic Condition 

Mindfulness is an incomparable tool to get past the mental struggles caused by pain and reduced mobility.Employing “mindfulness” also known as “restful alertness” can be described as being present in the moment. Training your mind to stay in the moment and not wander to anxiety and fear-driven thoughts will keep anxiety and stress at bay.

In 2015 there was a clinical trial study done Mindfulness meditation was been shown in clinical trial studies to reduce chronic pain by up to 57 percent.  

57 percent is a great number. Just think if you had 25 percent less pain, or 50 percent.

Just think what  that would do for so many and their overall happiness , quality of life. 
Living with chronic pain and illness can be intolerable. Even  for some after taking the maximum dose of painkillers, the aching soon returns with a vengeance. You want to do something, anything, to stop the pain, but whatever you try seems to fail. Moving hurts. Doing nothing hurts. Ignoring it hurts.

But it’s not just the pain that hurts; your mind can start to suffer as you desperately try to find a way of escaping. Pointed and bitter questions can begin nagging at your soul: What will happen if I don’t recover? What if it gets worse? I can’t cope with this . ~ Please, I just want it to stop~
It’s only natural to want to fight back against pain and illness in times such as these, but what if this struggle actually made your suffering worse?
 What if it was more effective to explore the sensations of pain and illness as they rose and fell in your body? 
This may seem like the worst thing imaginable, but the latest medical advances show that it can be more powerful than the most commonly prescribed painkillers.
I know when I was first diagnosed with Avascular Necrosis \Osteonecrosis my pain was so intense so mind bending at times I could not even think clearly.
I hate pills all pills and I didn’t want to take them but at first I did but I noticed it just eased the pain the pain never actually went away. 

Then in my searches for a good honest qualified orthopedic doctor who would help me by trying new things vs always wanting to inject me with steroids or hand me an rx for them with the phrase “Well Deb we just have to wait until the knee collapses and then we can replace it”

SAY WHAT !!

I would leave their offices frustrated and furious. Vowing to find my own relief, treatment etc

I was scared to death about what was going to happen to my mobility, my job why wasn’t any ortho interested in actually helping me vs waiting for my knee to collapse and then replace it?
I read book after book 

Seeking out my own remedy 

I Spoke to (paying copays and X-rays and Mri’s & blood test along the way) 

Orthopedics 

Physical Therapists

Osteopath’s

Rheumatologist’s

Endocrinologist’s

Vascular Specialists 

Hematologist’s

The best they came up with we will wait until your knee joint collapses and replace it. 

So many areas of physicians: osteopathic and allopathic and naturopathic 
Let’s learn the difference 

I mean I felt cheated-  My family doctor at that time was a DO –

Doctor of Osteopath Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine, or DOs, are fully licensed physicians who practice in all areas of medicine. Emphasizing a whole-person approach to treatment and care, DOs are trained to listen and partner with their patients to help them get healthy and stay well. DOs receive special training in the musculoskeletal system, your body’s interconnected system of nerves, muscles and bones. By combining this knowledge with the latest advances in medical technology, they offer patients the most comprehensive care available in medicine today. Osteopathic physicians focus on prevention, tuning into how a patient’s lifestyle and environment can impact their wellbeing. DOs strive to help you be truly healthy in mind, body and spirit — not just free of symptoms.
I think mine was either absent that day or became so busy seeing patients he forgot what his title really meant.  I got none of the treatment or knowledge of the above definition. 

Naturopathic physicians combine the wisdom of nature with the rigors of modern science. Steeped in traditional healing methods, principles and practices, naturopathic medicine focuses on holistic, proactive prevention and comprehensive diagnosis and treatment. By using protocols that minimize the risk of harm, naturopathic physicians help facilitate the body’s inherent ability to restore and maintain optimal health. It is the naturopathic physician’s role to identify and remove barriers to good health by helping to create a healing internal and external environment. NDs treat all medical conditions and can provide both individual and family health care. Among the most common ailments they treat are allergies, chronic pain, digestive issues, hormonal imbalances, obesity, respiratory conditions, heart disease, fertility problems, menopause, adrenal fatigue, cancer, fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. NDs can perform minor surgeries, such as removing cysts or stitching up superficial wounds. However, they do not practice major surgery. NDs are trained to utilize prescription drugs, although the emphasis of naturopathic medicine is the use of natural healing agents.

Allopathic Physician MD Nurses and physicians are on the front line of medicine. As practitioners, they work in solo or group practices examining patients and obtaining medical histories; ordering, performing and interpreting diagnostic tests; and prescribing and administering treatment for patients suffering from injury or disease. They also counsel patients about illness, injuries, health conditions and preventive healthcare (diet/fitness, smoking cessation, etc.).

In hospitals, they provide emergency care, perform surgery and care for patients with injuries or life-threatening illnesses like cancer or serious conditions like asthma. In laboratories across the country, physician researchers look for the cause of illnesses and for new and better ways to treat all kinds of diseases and injuries. They run medical centers and teach future generations of physicians and other health care practitioners.
They all sound great right? So what happens to many doctors when they come across a patient who’s medical is difficult,challenging. Sometimes it seems they don’t have time or want to make time because either they are to busy or they aren’t very knowledgeable in that area of  condition disease or illness. So they seem fudge through it. 

Many never think outside the box. 

If this happens move on. Find a new Dr. 
I Spoke to herbalists and a  naturopath  or two , one  I really wish was covered by insurance. The other was just interested in $.
But the one that I would love to see if I could afford her was so knowledgeable in the brief time I met her and sat down for about an hour and just spoke to her she gave me general suggestions that honestly have helped me more than others I paid to see regularly.

I learned to be more mindful 

I learned to do basic meditation 

I changed the way I was thinking 

I began to exercise again this time I had a plan. 

I started a journal and a food log which I could see if what I was eating contributed to my pain. And my feeling when I ate. I will get into that tomorrow.
 I exercised whether in pain or no pain. I started out with 5 minutes 3-4x a day on a recumbent bike to see how my joints felt. 
Then went to 7 minutes, then 10 then 15

I did my research on supplements 

I started to take herbology classes 

I was living in the moment and being mindful about everything.

I began transforming my pain into a glorious and grateful  appreciation  for which is right in front of me.  

Eating Healthy and taking my supplements and Exercising a new mindful way and added meditation was working. ,

It wasn’t over night but in a couple weeks I noticed I felt happier, not as still all the time, and pain was not as intense as usual.

Over time I noticed more improvements.

I then quit smoking after 40 years 

I can tell you meditation and diet and any exercise helps .

Try it 

Talk to your doctor and what do you have to lose. 

To be continued tomorrow….

Check out these  cute videos and learn about meditation and mindfulness 
Meditation Info https://youtu.be/rqoxYKtEWEc
Beginners Guide to Meditation https://youtu.be/w6T02g5hnT4
How being Mindful Empowers Us https://youtu.be/vzKryaN44ss
MeditationVideo          https://youtu.be/YeeDo-c3lDI