Posted in Arthritis, Chronic Pain, Pain

Not All Pain is Created Equal

Not All Pain is Created Equal

When we hear the word arthritis, we think of our grandparents talking about their joint aches. We had no idea it could happen to children and people of all ages.

There are more than 100 types of arthritis and related diseases, and not all arthritis pain is alike. It can originate in different areas of our body, triggering chemical and electrical signals that move from the area of pain or injury up to brain and back to let us know that hurt

I have a high tolerance for pain so when I am hurting, I know it’s bad. Everyone’s threshold and tolerance for pain is unique. Then, there are days I bump my hand or arm and I see stars. I just don’t understand it….

Living and coping with chronic pain can be the hardest part of living with a joint disease. It can disrupt every part of our life and many parts of your life can also affect your pain.

Facts on Pain

  • As many as 75 percent of those 65 and older report persistent pain from arthritis and other chronic conditions.
  • Almost four out of five older adults have multiple chronic conditions besides arthritis, like diabetes, heart disease and obesity. And the combination can heighten pain and discomfort.
  • Women are more likely to develop chronic pain and often feel pain more intensely than men.
  • In the United States, 23% of all adults—over 54 million people—have arthritis. About 24 million adults are limited in their activities from arthritis, and more than 1 in 4 adults with arthritis report severe joint pain

National Prevalence

  • From 2013–2015, an estimated 54.4 million US adults (22.7%) annually had ever been told by a doctor that they had some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia. Learn more about national arthritis statistics.
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Throughout September, I want to help bring attention to living with chronic pain and the suffering arthritis frequently causes. Let your family and friends know it’s Pain Awareness Month and ask them to help spread the word about how important it is to find more effective treatments and a cure for all forms of joint pain and arthritis.

Most of all, make sure you take care of yourself.

Tips on taking care of yourself and living with arthritis

References

Managing a flare – Arthritis Foundation- https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/managing-pain/pain-relief-solutions/tips-for-managing-an-arthritis-flare

Exercise and kids with JA – https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/physical-activity/getting-started/best-exercises-for-children-with-ja

Arthritis , Autoimmune and Rheumatology Research Cure Arthritis https://curearthritis.org/arthritis-research

Posted in Awareness

Dealing with Joint Pain in the Pandemic

How do I deal with my knee and back pain until the orthopedic doctors start seeing patients again?

There are a variety of non-operative treatment options for pain. No one treatment is going to help everyone, and patients need to find the treatments that seem to work the best for them.

Medications I personally cannot take NSAIDS so I reach for

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is an over-the-counter option that is safe and effective for me.

For many Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) – e.g. Ibuprofen and naproxen – may also be helpful. Prescription NSAIDs are also an option to discuss with your health care provider.

Some say medical marijuana helps them. I’ve never tried it so I cannot comment.

Supplements, such as glucosamine/chondroitin, are generally safe and may be helpful in reducing some arthritic pain. Also talk to you doctor about curcumin supplements tablets .

I drink Turmeric tea aka golden milk it is a natural anti-inflammatory agent.

Exercise helps me. I’m not talking about running or walking a marathon.

Just 1-2 miles once or twice a day. Makes me feel good especially in summer. My joints love the heat.

I have a daily exercise regimen, specifically designed for me and my knee osteonecrosis osteoarthritis, and this back pain that is really an out of the blue pain.

With osteonecrosis moving is critically important for maintaining strength in muscles supporting the joints , reducing pain and it’s also great for stress.

It is important to be as active as your joints allow and find a variety of stretching and strengthening exercises that you perform daily, without increasing your pain.

A good source for exercise instruction for arthritis may be found at you ortho office maybe they can email you some ideas.

Crutches, a walker, ice/heat treatments and a knee brace may also be helpful in managing your hip and/or knee pain.

Weight Loss and Diet

The covid 19 is a little saying that explains what is happened to many since the pandemic.

And extra 19 pounds can cause the joints to really hurt.

Many patients with osteonecrosis and arthritis are carrying a few extra pounds and weight loss reduces stress across our joints.

We put 3-5X our body weight across our hip and knee joints with activity, particularly stair climbing and getting in and out of a chair. Every 10 pounds of extra weight carried results in 50 pounds of weight bearing pressure across the hips and knees!

A healthy diet is important for general health and weight loss, and some may find benefit from focusing on an “anti-inflammatory” diet. The anti-inflammatory diet is a diet which includes tomatoes, olive oil, green leafy vegetables, nuts, fatty fish, and fresh fruit, particularly blueberries, strawberries, cherries and oranges. Foods thought to cause inflammation, and to avoid, include white bread and pastries, French fries, soda, margarine and red meat.

In summary: stay active, eat healthy, maintain social distancing as instructed and maintain a positive attitude.

Please know that your orthopedic provider and all pcp ‘s are also anxious to get back to “business as usual” and help you to resolve your arthritic pain!

Check out my other posts on great recipes

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Wishing you love, good health and a pain free day

Love

Deb

https://flexitarianforlife.wordpress.com/

http://www.ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com

Posted in Awareness

All About Our Knees Part 3 of 6

Part 3 knee

Knee injuries can be the result of sports, falls or trauma. They typically involve the ligaments that hold two of the bones of the knee – the femur and tibia – together. Here are some of the most common types:

Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are among the most common and dreaded sports injuries. Your ACL keeps your knee from moving too far out of position. Changing directions too quickly or hyperextending the knee can tear the ACL. Women are more prone to tearing the ACL. Surgery is often necessary to repair damage to an ACL.

A stretch or tear of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is typically caused by a hit or blow to the outer knee. Pain is felt along the inner knee. Bracing and conservative treatment, such as rest and physical therapy, are usually sufficient to heal these injuries.

The meniscus is crescent-shaped cartilage between your thigh bone (femur) and lower leg bone (tibia). You have two of these cushions in each of your knees, inner (medial) and outer (lateral). The medial one is most often injured. These injuries often are caused by sudden twisting, resulting in swelling, pain and locking of the knee. Arthroscopic surgery may be necessary to remove the torn fragment when conservative treatment does not help.

Posted in Awareness

All About Our Knees Part 2

Types of Pain

What are the different types of knee pain?

Knee pain has many causes. Some of the most common include:

Osteoarthritis

Arthritis is a chronic condition that causes joint inflammation. Symptoms include redness, warmth, swelling, tenderness and pain. Up to 30 percent of the population may have knee osteoarthritis, or “wear and tear” arthritis. This is the gradual breakdown of the cartilage in the knee. Also called degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis usually develops over years and often is found in patients who have had a knee infection or injury and those who are overweight.

As cartilage wears away, the bones around it can grow thicker and develop bony spurs. This can lead to increased friction between the bones and disrupted movement in your knee. This also can lead to problems with the synovium, a membrane in your knee that produces a liquid to keep your cartilage slippery. This membrane can become inflamed and make too much fluid. This results in swelling, or “water on the knee.” In the most severe cases, the knee can become deformed as the continued friction wears away the bone.

Common symptoms of osteoarthritis include pain, stiffness, tenderness, a limited range of motion and a grating sensation when you bend your knee. The pain is usually worse after activity.

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis can affect joints on both sides of the body (both knees, both hands and/or both wrists). In rheumatoid arthritis, your body’s cells attack your own tissues. While in most people symptoms develop gradually over years, they can appear rapidly. Rheumatoid arthritis affects three to five times more women than men and often presents between the ages of 20 and 50.

Rheumatoid arthritis may be related to a combination of abnormal immunity and genetic, environmental and hormonal factors. Over time, rheumatoid arthritis can cause cartilage to wear away, swelling in the synovium, and excess fluid in the knee. In later stages, bones can rub against each other.

Bursitis

Bursitis is the inflammation of any of the fluid-filled sacs (bursae) protecting the body’s joints. This is usually caused by repetitive motions or by a stress such as kneeling. Sometimes, a sudden injury can cause bursitis.

Tendonitis

The tendons – rope-like tissues connecting muscles to bone at the knee and other joints – can become painfully inflamed by repetitive and strenuous movement. Tendonitis is a common sports injury, caused by overuse of the same parts of the body. Patellar tendinitis, or “jumper’s knee,” is an inflammation or irritation of the tendon between the knee cap and the shin bone.

Baker’s cyst

A lump behind your knee could be a Baker’s cyst. A Baker’s cyst, also called a popliteal cyst, is a fluid-filled pocket that causes swelling and tightness behind the knee. Often, it is not painful. A Baker’s cyst is typically associated with arthritis or a cartilage tear, conditions that can cause your knee to produce too much fluid. The key to treatment is to find the underlying cause of the fluid accumulating in the Baker’s cyst.

Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS)

Knee pain or discomfort while walking up and down stairs, jumping or squatting may be symptoms of patellofemoral pain syndrome. This common knee problem is felt toward the front of the knee. It can cause a grinding sensation when bending or straightening your leg, and can cause your knee to occasionally buckle. Sometimes called “runner’s knee,” patellofemoral pain syndrome may be caused by a kneecap that is not aligned properly, overuse, injury, excess weight or when the cartilage in the knee cap is worn significantly.

Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis

Osteonecrosis of the knee (also known as avascular necrosis) is a painful condition that occurs when the blood supply to a section of bone in the femur (thighbone) or tibia (shinbone) is disrupted. The pain varies from no pain to severe hot pain. Like bathe feeling of being hit in knee with a hot iron or sharp stabbing lightening bolt pain. Treatment can vary depending on stage from Prp injections to Total Knee Replacement.

SPONK Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the knee comes on suddenly.

Posted in Awareness

All About Our Knees Part 1 of a 6 part series.

About the knee 1 of 6

Did you know that your knee is the largest joint in your body. Its a really amazing and complex mechanism made of bone, cartilage and ligaments. The cartilage in your knee acts as a cushion and gliding surface. So the knee can move freely.

When the knee is healthy, the cartilage keeps the bones in the joint from rubbing together. However, when the joint is affected by arthritis, the bones make contact and cause mild or severe pain.

Injuries, as well as aging and degenerative conditions such as arthritis, osteoarthritis can cause the cartilage to break down.

Things like osteonecrosis of the knee (also known as avascular necrosis) is a painful condition that occurs when the blood supply to a section of bone in the femur (thighbone) or tibia (shinbone) is disrupted. And eventually can lead to severe osteoarthritis and even joint collapse.

Knee pain can affect every step you take. From playing sports to climbing steps, knee pain is difficult to ignore.

Some home remedies may help temporarily, but if you have chronic pain or symptoms such as swollen or red joints, it’s time to see a doctor.

I am not a fan of steroid injections or corticosteroids period as they can lead to Osteonecrosis.

And in my opinion doctors use these way too much for me. It seems like the go to drug for everything.

Because it helps inflammation but When prescribed in doses that exceed your body’s usual levels, corticosteroids suppress inflammation. This can reduce the signs and symptoms of inflammatory conditions, such as arthritis and asthma.

But they also have side effects like

What side effects can corticosteroids cause?

  • Elevated pressure in the eyes (glaucoma)
  • Fluid retention, causing swelling in your lower legs.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Problems with mood swings, memory and behavior and other psychological effects, such as confusion or delirium. Just to name a few.
Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Patient Leader, WegoHealth, WEGOHealthAwards, WEGOHealthAwards2020

I Am A Nominee In The WEGOHealth Awards 2020

I am so honored to share that I am a nominee in the WEGOHealth Awards for Best In Show – Community and Patient Leader Hero

#WEGOHealthChat #WEGOHealthAwards #PatientLeader #Osteoarthritis #Osteonecrosis #Grateful www,ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com and  https://avascularnecrosiseducation.com

 

My WEGOHealth Profile Link    Deborah Andio WEGOHealth Profile Link

Voting will begin in July and link will be posted then to vote.

Until then if you wish to nominate me or read about WEGOHealth or take the time to nominate other amazing hardworking Advocates please go to link below

WEGOHealthAwards Vote – Review Nominees – How It Works -The Judges

 

My Nominations

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Posted in Awareness

Arthritis Pain Do’s and Don’ts

Arthritis pain:

The Do’s and The don’ts

Will physical activity reduce or increase your arthritis pain? Get tips on exercise and other common concerns when coping with arthritis symptoms and arthritis pain.

Arthritis is a leading cause of pain and disability worldwide. You can find plenty of advice about easing the pain of arthritis and other conditions with exercise, medication and stress reduction. How do you know what will work for you?

Here are some do’s and don’ts to help you figure it out

Basics

Whatever your condition, it will be easier to stay ahead of your pain if you:

• Learn all you can about your condition, including what type of arthritis you have and whether any of your joints are already damaged

• Enlist your doctor, friends and family in managing your pain

• Tell your doctor if your pain changes

Everyday routines

Pay attention to your joints, whether sitting, standing or engaging in activity. When we have pain the last thing we want to do is move but often what we should be doing.

• Keep your joints moving. Do daily, gentle stretches that move your joints through their full range of motion.

• Use good posture. A physical therapist can show you how to sit, stand and move correctly.

• Know your limits. Balance activity and rest, and don’t overdo it.

In addition, lifestyle changes are important for easing pain.

• Manage weight. Being overweight can increase complications of arthritis and contribute to more arthritis pain. Making incremental, permanent lifestyle changes resulting in gradual weight loss is often the most effective method of weight management.

• Quit smoking. If you smoke stop. It’s not that hard , I quit smoking and so can you. Smoking causes stress on connective tissues, which can increase arthritis pain.Smoking also slows down the healing process as well as it’s a nasty stinky habit.

Exercise

When you have arthritis, movement can decrease your pain and stiffness, improve your range of motion, strengthen your muscles, and increase your endurance.

What to do

Choose the right kinds of activities those that build the muscles around your joints but don’t damage the joints themselves. A physical or occupational therapist can help you develop an exercise program that’s right for you.

Don’t just go start jogging if you have knee problems or lifting weights if you have back and joint issues.

Always consult your doctor before doing anything!!

Once you get the ok.

Focus on stretching, range-of-motion exercises and gradual progressive strength training. Include low-impact aerobic exercise, such as walking, cycling or water exercises, to improve your mood and help control your weight.

What to avoid

Avoid activities that involve high impact and repetitive motion, such as:

• Running

• Jumping

• Tennis

• High-impact aerobics

• Repeating the same movement, such as a tennis serve, again and again

Medications

Many types of medications are available for arthritis pain relief. Most are relatively safe, but no medication is completely free of side effects. Talk with your doctor to formulate a medication plan for your specific pain symptoms.

What to do

Over-the-counter pain medications, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen sodium (Aleve) can help relieve occasional pain triggered by activity your muscles and joints aren’t used to — such as gardening after a winter indoors. But not everyone can take certain medications again talk to your doctor.

Cream containing capsaicin may be applied to skin over a painful joint to relieve pain, do not use if you have a scratch, cut or open wound. Use alone or with oral medication.

Consult your doctor if over-the-counter medications don’t relieve your pain.

What to avoid

• Overtreatment. Talk with your doctor if you find yourself using over-the-counter pain relievers regularly.

• Undertreatment. Don’t try to ignore severe and prolonged arthritis pain. You might have joint inflammation or damage requiring daily medication.

• Focusing only on pain. Depression is more common in people with arthritis. Doctors have found that treating depression with antidepressants and other therapies reduces not only depression symptoms but also arthritis pain.

Physical and emotional integration

It’s no surprise that arthritis pain has a negative effect on your mood. If everyday activities make you hurt, you’re bound to feel discouraged. But when these normal feelings escalate to create a constant refrain of fearful, hopeless thoughts, your pain can actually get worse and harder to manage.

What to do

Therapies that interrupt destructive mind-body interactions include:

• Cognitive behavioral therapy. This well-studied, effective combination of talk therapy and behavior modification helps you identify — and break — cycles of self-defeating thoughts and actions.

• Relaxation therapy. Meditating, doing yoga, deep breathing, listening to music, being in nature, writing in a journal do whatever helps you relax. There’s no downside to relaxation, and it can help ease pain.

• Acupuncture. Some people get pain relief through acupuncture treatments, when a trained acupuncturist inserts hair-thin needles at specific points on your body. It can take several weeks before you notice improvement.

• Heat and cold. Use of heat, such as applying heating pads to aching joints, taking hot baths or showers, or immersing painful joints in warm paraffin wax, can help relieve pain temporarily. Be careful not to burn yourself. Use heating pads for no more than 20 minutes at a time.
Use of cold, such as applying ice packs to sore muscles, can relieve pain and inflammation after strenuous exercise.

• Massage. Massage might improve pain and stiffness temporarily. Make sure your massage therapist knows where your arthritis affects you.

What to avoid

• Smoking. If you’re addicted to tobacco, you might use it as an emotional coping tool. But it’s counterproductive: Toxins in smoke cause stress on connective tissue, leading to more joint problems.

• A negative attitude. Negative thoughts are self-perpetuating. As long as you dwell on them, they escalate, which can increase your pain and risk of disability. Instead, distract yourself with activities you enjoy, spend time with people who support you and consider talking to a therapist.

Wishing you a pain free day

Deb

Posted in Advocate, Arthritis, Awareness, Meditation, Mindfulness, osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Pain

How I Use Meditation and Palming To Help My Pain

So I have been meditating for over 18 months. It has helped me learn to quiet my mind. Focus on my breathing and start taking back some control of my pain.

It sure did pay off last week.

I fell after another bowman lost her balance her cane went sliding and she also grabbed onto me as for me to stop her fall.

That did not happen.

As with any time I am feeling pain I try to meditate the pain away.

Sometimes it works fantastically sometimes it just calms me which is also good.

Here are the steps I take to help meditate my pain away

Step 1: Stabilize your mind

Step 2: Identify the area where you feel pain.

Step 3: Focus your mind to the pain sensation in the area.

Step 4: Notice if the pain sensation changes.

Step 5: If your mind wanders, gently bring your mind back to the object of your meditation, which is a focused awareness on pain.

Mind stabilization can be achieved with mindfulness meditation, described as “a simple mental exercise, which develops mindfulness and concentration by paying attention on a chosen object (for example, taste of food or activity you wish to focus on) and holding the attention for a period of time. Mindfulness meditation does not necessarily require sitting but can be practiced while eating, walking, running, commuting, and doing other activities. This mental exercise also helps develop an ability to sustain mindfulness for prolonged time.”

Here are helpful tips for quieting an unquiet mind:

  • Meditate for only two minutes (gradually move to 3,4,5,15… minutes)
  • Use a timer to remind you of an end of a meditation session.
  • Instead of trying to stop, welcome it whatever arises.
  • If you cannot concentrate on the object of your meditation, pay attention to the thoughts and stories occurring in your mind instead.
  • If you cannot meditate while sitting, meditate while walking,hiking,running,laying down at night, eating etc….

Say to your self

I am

Breathe in I breathe out am – do this a few times then add I am pain free, I am healing, I am well.

When I’m finished doing this for a few minutes at the end I rub my hands together get them warm and gently place the palms of my hands on my eyes. It feels so good. You can then rub your head.

Feeling the energy in your body going to help your pain.

Palming helps the eyes

Palming: Palming, which was originally invented by Tibetan yogis, is done in darkness with the palms cupping the eyes. Palming soothes the optic nerve, which is often irritated. Sit in a darkened room with your elbows leaning on a table. Relax your back and shoulders, rub your hands together vigorously to warm them, then place your palms over your eyes. Don’t press the eye sockets and don’t lean on the cheekbones. Visualize total blackness, the most relaxing color for the brain, and breathe deeply. Let the blackness permeate everything: your eyes, your whole body, the room you sit in, the city, the state, the continent, the planet, the stars, the universe.

You may see all kinds of lights, which is an indication of irritation in the optic nerve. In fact, you may not see total darkness until you have completed several palming sessions. Palm for as long as is comfortable.

Meditation and Palming

I find this not just relaxing but I feel centered , calm , content and I have less pain when I do this 2x a day, for just 10 minutes.

Here are the links I used and still use sometimes

I am – guided meditation by Wayne Dyer https://youtu.be/BoE4QjMiHys

Palming for relaxing and helping eyes

Posted in Awareness, Bone Health

Fall Weather + Falling Temps = Joint Pain

Can you predict the weather based on how your joints feel?

Is it Cloudy with a chance of pain I your neck of the woods?

Can increased joint pain be caused by the weather?

In my opinion and experience absolutely

For every mile I walk in the fall feels like 2 on my knee joints especially when it’s below 45 degrees and the air is very dry.

When its fall and winter my bones sound like I am walking on a few leaves or twigs some days.

There is no one explanation for why dropping temperatures affect your joints.

One theory relates to drops in barometric pressure, which causes tendons, muscles, and the surrounding tissues to expand. Because of the confined space within the body, this can cause pain, especially in joints affected by osteoarthritis.

For me having Osteoarthritis and Osteonecrosis as well as Spondylolisthesis in my L5S1 this weather has been pretty painful for several years now. But I cannot allow it to keep me from moving.

In days I just want to stay under the blanket, I still make sure I move .

Sitting is a killer.

Thankfully I have found ways to help my pain

I take curcumin as well as a few years ago started to I eat a more plant based diet.

It’s not only helped my pain be less intense it’s also given me other benefits, lower blood pressure, lower cholesterol and triglycerides and my scale was lower.

Sure we need protein but for me I prefer mostly plant protein and occasionally eat chicken and fish and maybe 1x a month good quality red meat.

I have noticed a big improvement on how I feel also.

Less foggy , more energy and just overall more balanced.

I eat

  • Omega-3 fatty acids. Think fish and walnuts to curb inflammation. Avocados yummy!!
  • Vitamin K. Make meals that feature greens, such as spinach, kale, and cabbage, for their pain-soothing properties.
  • Vitamin C. Add color to your diet with juicy oranges, sweet red peppers and tomatoes, and other C-rich foods to halt cartilage loss (and resulting pain) that comes with arthritis
  • Spices Turmeric, Curcumin,Hot peppers, Sriracha I love all the heat and they have anti inflammatory properties that help with pain.

I avoid

Avoid foods high in omega-6 fatty acids, such as corn oil, which may trigger painful inflammation.

Also swap refined grains for more whole grain. research suggests refined grains have an inflammatory effect, whereas high-fiber whole grains may help reduce inflammation.

Keep Moving
One reason cold weather is linked to joint pain is people are less likely to exercise when it’s chilly and damp.

Being a couch potato is bad news for your joints because exercise helps lubricate them to prevent pain and it’s shown to age us faster.

I have a recumbent bike for indoors to help my joints stay moving.

I make sure I’m getting plenty of vitamin D to help keep my bones stay strong and prevent even morejoint pain.

I for a supplement with D3 (the kind your body manufactures from sunlight), but check with your doctor first because some supplements can interact with prescription and over-the-counter drugs.

Another thing I do is I keep my joints warm.

I love thermacare heat wraps.

Many ask me about what I eat in a day or what products I like.

So lasted this week I will let you know as I get my holiday favs ready.

I am not paid or endorsed in anyway.

These are things I like from personal experience.

Stay warm , and keep moving

Wishing you a pain free day

Posted in awards,patient leader, Awareness

WEGOHealth Awards2019©

Wow I am beyond honored I’ve now also been

Nominated for Patient Leader Hero- Healthcare Collaborator – Rookie of The Year and Best In Show Blog

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Endorsements Now Open If You Would Like to Vote (link below)

I have been nominated for the past few years in various categories

Thank You for considering Endorsing my nominations

It’s deeply appreciated

My Profile and Info WEGOHealth Link

Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis Education

FlexitarianForLife

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Posted in Awareness

Knee pain from exercise? Here’s what you should know….

Do you suffer with knee pain from exercise?

Here’s what you should know, according to Health’s medical expert.

Knee pain especially during and after exercise is a common exercise complaint.

The knee is an intricate joint, involving bones, menisci, muscles, tendons, and ligaments they all are working in rhythm supporting the joint.

If there is damage or stress to any of these components, you may have achy knees. Plus, many physical activities—running, jumping, stretching, bending—can put a lot of strain, impact, or body weight directly on the knees, and in turn, cause pain while you work out. This is common among weekend warriors who work out intensely but inconsistently. You can also develop tendonitis over time if you’re regularly doing these motions.

If you feel sharp sudden or stabbing pain stop and contact your physician.

Knee pain is a common complaint that affects people of all ages. Knee pain may be the result of an injury, such as a ruptured ligament or torn cartilage. Medical conditions — including arthritis, gout and infections — also can cause knee pain.

Many types of minor knee pain respond well to self-care measures. Physical therapy and knee braces also can help relieve knee pain. In some cases, however, your knee may require surgical repair.

Symptoms

The location and severity of knee pain may vary, depending on the cause of the problem. Signs and symptoms that sometimes accompany knee pain include:

  • Swelling and stiffness
  • Redness and warmth to the touch
  • Weakness or instability
  • Popping or crunching noises
  • Inability to fully straighten the knee

When to see a doctor

Call your doctor if you:

  • Can’t bear weight on your knee or feel as if your knee is unstable (gives out)
  • Have marked knee swelling
  • Are unable to fully extend or flex your knee
  • See an obvious deformity in your leg or knee
  • Have a fever, in addition to redness, pain and swelling in your knee
  • Have severe knee pain that is associated with an injury

Causes

Knee pain can be caused by injuries, mechanical problems, types of arthritis and other problems.

Injuries

A knee injury can affect any of the ligaments, tendons or fluid-filled sacs (bursae) that surround your knee joint as well as the bones, cartilage and ligaments that form the joint itself. Some of the more common knee injuries include:

  • ACL injury. An ACL injury is a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) — one of four ligaments that connect your shinbone to your thighbone. An ACL injury is particularly common in people who play basketball, soccer or other sports that require sudden changes in direction.
  • Fractures. The bones of the knee, including the kneecap (patella), can be broken during motor vehicle collisions or falls. People whose bones have been weakened by osteoporosis can sometimes sustain a knee fracture simply by stepping wrong.
  • Torn meniscus. The meniscus is formed of tough, rubbery cartilage and acts as a shock absorber between your shinbone and thighbone. It can be torn if you suddenly twist your knee while bearing weight on it.
  • Knee bursitis. Some knee injuries cause inflammation in the bursae, the small sacs of fluid that cushion the outside of your knee joint so that tendons and ligaments glide smoothly over the joint.
  • Patellar tendinitis. Tendinitis is irritation and inflammation of one or more tendons — the thick, fibrous tissues that attach muscles to bones. Runners, skiers, cyclists, and those involved in jumping sports and activities may develop inflammation in the patellar tendon, which connects the quadriceps muscle on the front of the thigh to the shinbone.

Mechanical problems

Some examples of mechanical problems that can cause knee pain include:

  • Loose body. Sometimes injury or degeneration of bone or cartilage can cause a piece of bone or cartilage to break off and float in the joint space. This may not create any problems unless the loose body interferes with knee joint movement, in which case the effect is something like a pencil caught in a door hinge.
  • Iliotibial band syndrome. This occurs when the tough band of tissue that extends from the outside of your hip to the outside of your knee (iliotibial band) becomes so tight that it rubs against the outer portion of your femur. Distance runners and cyclists are especially susceptible to iliotibial band syndrome.
  • Dislocated kneecap. This occurs when the triangular bone (patella) that covers the front of your knee slips out of place, usually to the outside of your knee. In some cases, the kneecap may stay displaced and you’ll be able to see the dislocation.
  • Hip or foot pain. If you have hip or foot pain, you may change the way you walk to spare these painful joints. But this altered gait can place more stress on your knee joint. In some cases, problems in the hip or foot can cause knee pain.

Types of arthritis

More than 100 different types of arthritis exist. The varieties most likely to affect the knee include:

  • Osteoarthritis. Sometimes called degenerative arthritis, osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It’s a wear-and-tear condition that occurs when the cartilage in your knee deteriorates with use and age.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. The most debilitating form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune condition that can affect almost any joint in your body, including your knees. Although rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease, it tends to vary in severity and may even come and go.
  • Gout. This type of arthritis occurs when uric acid crystals build up in the joint. While gout most commonly affects the big toe, it can also occur in the knee.
  • Pseudogout. Often mistaken for gout, pseudogout is caused by calcium-containing crystals that develop in the joint fluid. Knees are the most common joint affected by pseudogout.
  • Septic arthritis. Sometimes your knee joint can become infected, leading to swelling, pain and redness. Septic arthritis often occurs with a fever, and there’s usually no trauma before the onset of pain. Septic arthritis can quickly cause extensive damage to the knee cartilage. If you have knee pain with any of these symptoms, see your doctor right away.

Other problems

Patellofemoral

pain syndrome is a general term that refers to pain arising between the kneecap (patella) and the underlying thighbone (femur). It’s common in athletes; in young adults, especially those who have a slight maltracking of the kneecap; and in older adults, who usually develop the condition as a result of arthritis of the kneecap.

Osteonecrosis

Also called: Aseptic necrosis, Avascular necrosis, Ischemic necrosis

Osteonecrosis is a disease caused by reduced blood flow to bones in the joints. In people with healthy bones, new bone is always replacing old bone. In osteonecrosis, the lack of blood causes the bone to break down faster than the body can make enough new bone. The bone starts to die and may break down.

You can have osteonecrosis in one or several bones. It is most common in the upper leg. Other common sites are your upper arm and your knees, shoulders and ankles. The disease can affect men and women of any age, but it usually strikes in your thirties, forties or fifties. 

At first, you might not have any symptoms. As the disease gets worse, you will probably have joint pain that becomes more severe. You may not be able to bend or move the affected joint very well. 

No one is sure what causes the disease. Risk factors include 

  • Long-term steroid treatment
  • Alcohol abuse
  • Joint injuries
  • Having certain diseases, including arthritis and cancer 

Doctors use imaging tests and other tests to diagnose osteonecrosis. Treatments include medicines, using crutches, limiting activities that put weight on the affected joints, electrical stimulation and surgery.

Risk factors

A number of factors can increase your risk of having knee problems, including:

  • Excess weight. Being overweight or obese increases stress on your knee joints, even during ordinary activities such as walking or going up and down stairs. It also puts you at increased risk of osteoarthritis by accelerating the breakdown of joint cartilage.
  • Lack of muscle flexibility or strength. A lack of strength and flexibility can increase the risk of knee injuries. Strong muscles help to stabilize and protect your joints, and muscle flexibility can help you achieve full range of motion.
  • Certain sports or occupations. Some sports put greater stress on your knees than do others. Alpine skiing with its rigid ski boots and potential for falls, basketball’s jumps and pivots, and the repeated pounding your knees take when you run or jog all increase your risk of knee injury. Jobs that require repetitive stress on the knees such as construction or farming also can increase your risk.
  • Previous injury. Having a previous knee injury makes it more likely that you’ll injure your knee again.

Complications

Not all knee pain is serious. But some knee injuries and medical conditions, such as osteoarthritis, can lead to increasing pain, joint damage and disability if left untreated. And having a knee injury — even a minor one — makes it more likely that you’ll have similar injuries in the future.

Prevention

Although it’s not always possible to prevent knee pain, the following suggestions may help forestall injuries and joint deterioration:

  • Keep extra pounds off. Maintain a healthy weight; it’s one of the best things you can do for your knees. Every extra pound puts additional strain on your joints, increasing the risk of injuries and osteoarthritis.
  • Be in shape to play your sport. To prepare your muscles for the demands of sports participation, take time for conditioning. Work with a coach or trainer to ensure that your technique and movement are the best they can be.
  • Practice perfectly. Make sure the technique and movement patterns you use in your sports or activity are the best they can be. Lessons from a professional can be very helpful.
  • Get strong, stay flexible. Because weak muscles are a leading cause of knee injuries, you’ll benefit from building up your quadriceps and hamstrings, which support your knees. Balance and stability training helps the muscles around your knees work together more effectively. And because tight muscles also can contribute to injury, stretching is important. Try to include flexibility exercises in your workouts.
  • Be smart about exercise. If you have osteoarthritis, chronic knee pain or recurring injuries, you may need to change the way you exercise. Consider switching to swimming, water aerobics or other low-impact activities — at least for a few days a week. Sometimes simply limiting high-impact activities will provide relief.
Posted in Arthritis, Awareness, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis

What your eating maybe worsening your Osteoarthritis

Your eating what?

Before you take one more bite of that fast food lunch or dinner consider how it affects your osteoarthritis.

Did you know that research shows that diets high in saturated fat – found in red meat, butter, cheese, lard and processed foods – can weaken knee cartilage, making it more prone to damage.

Yep so start eating more plants

There was a study in 2017 published in Arthritis Care & Research, researchers followed more than 2,000 patients with OA for up to four years, checking disease progression  and diet at yearly intervals. Participants who ate the most fat, especially the saturated kind, showed increasing joint damage, whereas those who ate healthy fats like olive oil and avocados had little disease progression.

Another recent animal study showed that it even may harm the underlying bone, according to Yin Xiao, PhD, a professor at Queensland University of Technology in Australia and lead author of a 2017 study that looked at the effect of diet on OA.

“Our findings suggest that it’s not wear and tear but diet that has a lot to do with the onset of osteoarthritis,” he says.

Blame It On Inflammation

Fat’s not the only culprit, though. Sugar, refined carbs, red meat, processed food and corn and soybean oils can spark inflammation, too. Barry Sears, PhD, a long-time researcher in inflammatory nutrition, says eating them is “like throwing a match into a vat of gasoline.”

These foods also tend to pack on pounds, putting extra pressure on stressed joints. To make matters worse, body fat, especially the kind that collects around your belly, makes its own inflammatory proteins, perpetuating the cycle of inflammation even after you’ve sworn off junk food forever.

Fighting Back

The solution is to change the way you eat. Switching to an anti-inflammatory or Mediterranean-style diet can help you lose weight and significantly improve your joint, heart and  brain health without sacrificing good taste.

An anti-inflammatory diet is heavy on fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and healthy fats like olive oil, avocados and nuts. Poultry’s allowed  now and then and you can have one glass of red wine or beer a day. Off the menu, as you might expect, are sugar, red meat, and processed foods.

What sets this way of eating apart is that it actively fights inflammation, experts say.

“There are a variety of foods in the Mediterranean diet that are high in fiber, beta carotene, magnesium and omega 3s, all of which have been found to reduce inflammatory markers in human studies,” explains Michelle Babb, MS, RD, a Seattle-based nutrition educator.

“I’ve had [arthritis] patients who have been able to discontinue the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a result of transitioning to a Mediterranean diet. Some even report a noticeable difference in pain in the first week.”

Even so, changing the way you eat can be daunting.

“Don’t expect your diet to change overnight,” advises Sotiria Everett, EdD, RD, an assistant professor at Stonybrook University Medical Center in New York. “Start by looking at what you’re eating now (a food diary is a great way to do this) and identifying areas where you can improve.”

But Babb doesn’t see a problem. Her patients “really enjoy this food plan and don’t feel it’s a hardship to follow it,” she says.

She admits it takes more work and advance planning than the drive-through and recommends prepping some food for the week in advance.

I personally can agree with this as when I stopped eating so much red meat and cut out sugar and most processed junk I felt much better .

And when I eat things that are not as healthy as they should be I feel more pain.

So try a plant based diet or as they suggest Mediterranean

You will be so glad you did.

This taken from article Arthritis Foundation Blog

Posted in Arthritis, Awareness

May – Arthritis Awareness Month

I have had OA in knees over 14 years.

The clicking popping sounds , the feeling of stiffness like the tin man on the wizard of oz is normal especially when it’s rainy.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a form of degenerative joint pain caused by wear and tear on your joints. As you age, the cartilage that cushions your joints starts to wear down, causing the bones to rub together. The bone-on-bone action leads to inflammation of the joints.

Almost 300,000 babies and children have arthritis or a rheumatic condition.

The most common type of arthritis is osteoarthritis, which affects an estimated 54 million Americans.

Number of people expected to have doctor-diagnosed arthritis by the year 2040: more than 78 million.

People in the early stages of osteoarthritis may notice that moving the affected areas of their bodies is not as easy as it once was. Joint stiffness and pain can contribute to loss of flexibility, also called loss of range of motion.

Range of motion is the extent to which you can move your joints in their normal patterns. For example, fully bending and extending your knee is its range of motion.

If you have arthritis, you might not be able to bend your knee as far. Loss of flexibility is usually a very gradual process.

There’s no cure for osteoarthritis (OA) yet, but there are several treatment options and lifestyle changes that can relieve your symptoms. A combination of treatments and lifestyle changes can help:

  • alleviate symptoms
  • improve quality of life
  • slow progression of the disease

The right types of exercise can help with OA. Exercise may improve pain and stiffness and even prevent further damage to your joints. The stronger the muscles around your knee are, the better they can absorb the shock placed on the knee when you move.

Exercise can also help you lose weight, put less stress on the knees, and ease pain. Your doctor or physical therapist can recommend specific exercises based on your needs.

These may include strengthening exercises for your muscles and stretching and range-of-motion exercises for stiffness. Aerobic activity is recommended for those who need to lose weight.

Over-the-counter (OTC) medications like acetaminophen (Tylenol) and NSAIDs (ibuprofen, naproxen, aspirin) can help alleviate some of the pain and inflammation. Your doctor may also prescribe stronger medications.

Use caution, even when taking OTC medications. They can interact with other medications you’re taking. Always speak to your doctor before taking new medications.

Topical medications are also available. These creams and gels contain active ingredients that include: 

  • salicylate
  • menthol
  • capsaicin

Using these products may relieve the pain and inflammation associated with OA because of their heating and cooling effects on the skin.

Heat Over Ice

Many swear by ice ….. not me

I prefer heat… I also have osteonecrosis in Rt knee and I love love love thermacare heat wraps.

I personally found Heat helps my pain and mobility where as cold seems to make me hurt more.

Viscosupplementation works differently. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is injected into the knee joint. HA is a naturally present part of joint fluid. It lubricates the joints and helps them move freely. Most people with OA don’t have enough HA in their joint fluid.

By injecting HA into the joint, the knee benefits from extra lubrication. It decreases friction in the joint and improves the joint’s ability to absorb shock. This means less pain when you move.

Viscosupplementation has been found to provide relief to approximately 50 percent of people with OA of the knee. However, the newest guidelines from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) doesn’t recommend this for OA of the knee.

I personally hate cortisone injections. They cause me more pain and I get a reaction that makes me hurt worse.

Pulse it can lead to faster break down of cartilage and Osteonecrosis.

In the end we have to do and try what we feel may help.

Just know there are options

Prp Injections Platelet Rich Plasma

PRP

aaos treatment of osteoarthritis

I am not a paid endorser for any product mentioned.
Posted in Awareness, Chronic Pain, osteoarthritis, Pain

Osteoarthritis Facts

 

I have had OA for over 15 years and its painful. Its limiting and when you have it in your 40s it really sucks. Fast forward I am 56 and I am still learning how to cope with my pain associated with OA .

Writing about living with osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis as well as a bilateral pars fracture and spondylolisthesisin my L5 S1 has allowed me to meet great people, share my experiences with others, and better understand how people are dealing with similar issues. And hopefully help others like me.

We must not always sit sit means stiff and stiff means more pain.

Pain is the arguably the most distressing feature of osteoarthritis or any bone problem , affecting a patients quality of life and ability to carry out daily routines. Why osteoarthritis is sometimes painful and others painless is yet to be explained.

Today there are over 50 million adults in the United States have some type of arthritis. Although there are more than 100 different types of arthritis, when most people talk about arthritis many are referring to the most common type: osteoarthritis. More common in women, osteoarthritis causes chronic (long-term) symptoms and tends to occur more often as you age.

You are more at risk for osteoarthritis if you:

Are overweight

Have a family history of arthritis

Have had a previous joint injury

How to Manage Joint Pain as You Age

If you have osteoarthritis, your symptoms may come and go and they may become worse over time. Osteoarthritis symptoms can become so severe that you are unable to do certain things you could previously, such as write or walk up and down stairs. The most common symptoms of osteoarthritis include:

Pain and stiffness

Swelling near the joints

Trouble moving around without pain

Decreased range of motion

You can help prevent or delay osteoarthritis symptoms by doing the following:

Regularly exercising

Doing muscle strengthening activities

Avoiding repetitive movements that wear on joints

Maintaining a healthy weight

Living with Osteoarthritis

If you have mild or early symptoms of osteoarthritis, you can help manage your pain using these tips:

We have to keep moving — mild exercise, such as walking, at least once a day

Rest after activity

Alternate hot and cold on the affected joints

Massage therapy

Take over the counter anti-inflammatory pain relief if your allowed to- so check with your doctor

Most mild or moderate arthritis can be treated with a combination of anti-inflammatory medicine and hot/cold therapy or pain relieving creams, rubs or sprays. Some people find that acupuncture can also relieve arthritis symptoms.

When arthritis pain becomes severe, your doctor may recommend mild narcotic medicines with codeine or hydrocodone for pain.

Some patients also find temporary joint pain relief with corticosteroid injections. But use caution because this can cause an even bigger bone problem and that is Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis.

PRP and Prolotherapy as well as Injections like Euflexxa can help Oa and often can also ease some of the pain from osteonecrosis as well.

When medical treatment no longer provides relief, joint replacement surgery may be an option.

Did You know

The new study followed two groups of men and women who had knee osteoarthritis or were at risk for it. Among the first group, those who ate the most fiber were 30% less likely to develop knee pain or stiffness than those who ate the least fiber. More than 4,700 people with knee osteoarthritis were followed for 4 years.

The second group, which followed 1,200 for 9 years, had an even more dramatic result: top fiber consumers had a 60% lower risk for knee symptoms than those who consumed the least fiber.1

Researchers think that fiber’s benefits for those with arthritis stem from two factors:

  1. Fiber creates a feeling a fullness, which can help you eat less and manage weight better. Being overweight is a known risk factor for knee osteoarthritis.

See Knee Osteoarthritis Causes

  1. Fiber can decrease inflammation. Studies have found that fiber intake is inversely associated with levels in the body of C-reactive protein, an inflammatory marker.

Here are some great ways to add more fiber to your diet:

Add kidney or garbanzo beans or lentils to soups and salads

Instead of drinking juice, eat an orange or apple.

Keep raw, cut-up vegetables on hand for snacking. Dip them in yogurt or hummus and enjoy.

Keep fiber-rich snack options on hand, like unsalted nuts or dried fruit.

With a few small changes to your eating habits, you can help protect your knees, your heart, and more by getting fiber in your diet.

 

pain2

 

Education

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting millions of people worldwide. It occurs when the protective cartilage on the ends of your bones wears down over time.

Although osteoarthritis can damage any joint in your body, the disorder most commonly affects joints in your hands, knees, hips and spine.

Osteoarthritis symptoms can usually be effectively managed, although the underlying process cannot be reversed. Staying active, maintaining a healthy weight and other treatments may slow progression of the disease and help improve pain and joint function.

Symptoms

Osteoarthritis symptoms often develop slowly and worsen over time. Signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis include:

  • Pain. Your joint may hurt during or after movement.
  • Tenderness. Your joint may feel tender when you apply light pressure to it.
  • Stiffness. Joint stiffness may be most noticeable when you wake up in the morning or after a period of inactivity.
  • Loss of flexibility. You may not be able to move your joint through its full range of motion.
  • Grating sensation. You may hear or feel a grating sensation when you use the joint.
  • Bone spurs. These extra bits of bone, which feel like hard lumps, may form around the affected joint.

When to see a doctor

If you have joint pain or stiffness that doesn’t go away, make an appointment with your doctor.

Causes

Osteoarthritis occurs when the cartilage that cushions the ends of bones in your joints gradually deteriorates. Cartilage is a firm, slippery tissue that permits nearly frictionless joint motion.

In osteoarthritis, the slick surface of the cartilage becomes rough. Eventually, if the cartilage wears down completely, you may be left with bone rubbing on bone.

Risk factors

Factors that may increase your risk of osteoarthritis include:

  • Older age. The risk of osteoarthritis increases with age.
  • Sex. Women are more likely to develop osteoarthritis, though it isn’t clear why.
  • Obesity. Carrying extra body weight contributes to osteoarthritis in several ways, and the more you weigh, the greater your risk. Increased weight puts added stress on weight-bearing joints, such as your hips and knees. In addition, fat tissue produces proteins that may cause harmful inflammation in and around your joints.
  • Joint injuries. Injuries, such as those that occur when playing sports or from an accident, may increase the risk of osteoarthritis. Even injuries that occurred many years ago and seemingly healed can increase your risk of osteoarthritis.
  • Certain occupations. If your job includes tasks that place repetitive stress on a particular joint, that joint may eventually develop osteoarthritis.
  • Genetics. Some people inherit a tendency to develop osteoarthritis.
  • Bone deformities. Some people are born with malformed joints or defective cartilage, which can increase the risk of osteoarthritis.

Complications

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease that worsens over time. Joint pain and stiffness may become severe enough to make daily tasks difficult.

Some people are no longer able to work. When joint pain is this severe, doctors may suggest joint replacement surgery.

Imaging tests

Pictures of the affected joint can be obtained during imaging tests. Examples include:

X-rays. Cartilage doesn’t show up on X-ray images, but cartilage loss is revealed by a narrowing of the space between the bones in your joint. An X-ray may also show bone spurs around a joint. Some people may have X-ray evidence of osteoarthritis before they experience any symptoms.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An MRI uses radio waves and a strong magnetic field to produce detailed images of bone and soft tissues, including cartilage. An MRI isn’t commonly needed to diagnose osteoarthritis but may help provide more information in complex cases.

Lab tests

Analyzing your blood or joint fluid can help confirm the diagnosis.

Blood tests. Although there is no blood test for osteoarthritis, certain tests may help rule out other causes of joint pain, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

Joint fluid analysis. Your doctor may use a needle to draw fluid out of the affected joint. Examining and testing the fluid from your joint can determine if there’s inflammation and if your pain is caused by gout or an infection.

 

Medications

Osteoarthritis symptoms, primarily pain, may be helped by certain medications, including:

  • Acetaminophen. Acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) has been shown to be effective for people with osteoarthritis who have mild to moderate pain. Taking more than the recommended dosage of acetaminophen can cause liver damage.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Over-the-counter NSAIDs, including ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and naproxen sodium (Aleve, others), taken at the recommended doses, typically relieve osteoarthritis pain. Stronger NSAIDs, available by prescription, may also slightly reduce inflammation along with relieving pain.

    NSAIDs can cause stomach upset, cardiovascular problems, bleeding problems, and liver and kidney damage. Topical NSAIDs have fewer side effects and may relieve pain just as well.

  • Duloxetine (Cymbalta). Normally used as an antidepressant, this medication is also approved to treat chronic pain, including osteoarthritis pain.

Therapy

  • Physical therapy. A physical therapist can work with you to create an individualized exercise program that will strengthen the muscles around your joint, increase your range of motion and reduce pain. Regular gentle exercise that you do on your own, such as swimming or walking, can be equally effective.
  • Occupational therapy. An occupational therapist can help you discover ways to do everyday tasks or do your job without putting extra stress on your already painful joint. For instance, a toothbrush with a large grip could make brushing your teeth easier if you have finger osteoarthritis. A bench in your shower could help relieve the pain of standing if you have knee osteoarthritis.
  • Tai chi and yoga. These movement therapies involve gentle exercises and stretches combined with deep breathing. Many people use these therapies to reduce stress in their lives, and research suggests that tai chi and yoga may reduce osteoarthritis pain and improve movement. When led by a knowledgeable instructor, these therapies are safe. Avoid moves that cause pain in your joints.

Surgical and other procedures

If conservative treatments don’t help, you may want to consider procedures such as:

  • Cortisone injections. Injections of corticosteroid medications may relieve pain in your joint. During this procedure your doctor numbs the area around your joint, then places a needle into the space within your joint and injects medication. The number of cortisone injections you can receive each year is generally limited to three or four injections, because the medication can worsen joint damage over time.Use Caution as these can cause Osteonecrosis
  • Lubrication injections. Injections of hyaluronic acid may offer pain relief by providing some cushioning in your knee, though some research suggests these injections offer no more relief than a placebo. Hyaluronic acid is similar to a component normally found in your joint fluid.
  • Realigning bones. If osteoarthritis has damaged one side of your knee more than the other, an osteotomy might be helpful. In a knee osteotomy, a surgeon cuts across the bone either above or below the knee, and then removes or adds a wedge of bone. This shifts your body weight away from the worn-out part of your knee.
  • Joint replacement. In joint replacement surgery (arthroplasty), your surgeon removes your damaged joint surfaces and replaces them with plastic and metal parts. Surgical risks include infections and blood clots. Artificial joints can wear out or come loose and may need to eventually be replaced.
  • PRP Injections is a concentration of platelet cells taken from your blood, and these platelets have growth factors that may help in the healing process of chronic injuries. Growth factors are chemicals that signal the body to initiate a healing response.

Lifestyle and home remedies

Lifestyle changes can make a significant difference in osteoarthritis symptoms. Other home treatments also might help. Some things to try include:

  • Exercise. Exercise can increase your endurance and strengthen the muscles around your joint, making your joint more stable. Try walking, biking or swimming. If you feel new joint pain, stop.

    New pain that lasts for hours after you exercise probably means you’ve overdone it but doesn’t mean you have done any significant damage or that you should stop exercising. Simply resume a day or two later at a slightly lower level of intensity.

  • Lose weight. Obesity or even being somewhat overweight increases the stress on your weight-bearing joints, such as your knees and your hips. Even a small amount of weight loss can relieve some pressure and reduce your pain.

    Talk to a dietitian about healthy ways to lose weight. Most people combine changes in their diets with increased exercise.

  • Use heat and cold to manage pain. Both heat and cold can relieve pain in your joint. Heat also relieves stiffness, and cold can relieve muscle spasms and pain.
  • Capsaicin. Topical capsaicin — an active component in hot chili peppers — applied over an arthrititic joint may be an alternative for people who can’t take NSAIDs. It may not be noticeably helpful unless consistently applied three to four times a day for several weeks. Be sure to wash your hands well after applying capsaicin cream.
  • Apply over-the-counter pain creams. Creams and gels available at drugstores may provide temporary relief from osteoarthritis pain. Some creams numb the pain by creating a hot or cool sensation.

    Other creams contain medications, such as aspirin-like compounds, that are absorbed into your skin. Pain creams work best on joints that are close to the surface of your skin, such as your knees and fingers.

  • Braces or shoe inserts. Your doctor may recommend shoe inserts or other devices that can help reduce pain when you stand or walk. These devices can immobilize or support your joint to help take pressure off it.
  • Knee taping. Strapping tape may help ease the pain of knee osteoarthritis. Ask a doctor or physical therapist to demonstrate how best to place the tape.
  • Use assistive devices. Assistive devices can make it easier to go about your day without stressing your painful joint. A cane may take weight off your knee or hip as you walk. Carry the cane in the hand opposite the leg that hurts.

    Gripping and grabbing tools may make it easier to work in the kitchen if you have osteoarthritis in your fingers. Your doctor or occupational therapist may have ideas about what sorts of assistive devices may be helpful to you. Catalogs and medical supply stores also may be places to look for ideas.

Alternative medicine

Various complementary and alternative medicine may help with osteoarthritis symptoms. Treatments that have shown promise for osteoarthritis include:

  • Acupuncture. Some studies indicate that acupuncture can relieve pain and improve function in people who have knee osteoarthritis. During acupuncture, hair-thin needles are inserted into your skin at precise spots on your body.
  • Glucosamine and chondroitin. Studies have been mixed on these nutritional supplements. A few have found benefits for people with osteoarthritis, while most indicate that these supplements work no better than a placebo.Don’t use glucosamine if you’re allergic to shellfish. Glucosamine and chondroitin may interact with blood thinners such as warfarin and cause bleeding problems.
  • Avocado-soybean unsaponifiables. This nutritional supplement — a mixture of avocado and soybean oils — is widely used in Europe to treat knee and hip osteoarthritis. It acts as an anti-inflammatory, and some studies have shown it may slow down or even prevent joint damage.

 

Homemade Pain Rub

Pain Rub

Ingredients

½ cup carrier oil of choice (sweet almond, grapeseed, olive, etc.)

2 T. beeswax pellets (available here)

20 drops Lavender essential oil

10 drops Frankincense essential oil

10 drops Marjoram essential oil

10 drops Rosemary essential oil

Materials

Metal spoon

Large, heat safe glass bowl

Pot

Metal tin (such as these) or glass jar

Instructions

Pour the carrier oil and place the beeswax into the glass bowl.

Fill the pot halfway with water, and put it on the stove with medium high heat. Perch the glass bowl on top of the pot to create a double boiler effect. Once the water begins to boil, turn it down to medium low. You want the water to remain at a low boil, without getting all over the stove.

Stir the mixture with the metal spoon until the beeswax is melted.

Carefully remove the glass bowl from the heat and place it on a table top. Allow the mixture to cool for a few minutes, then stir in the essential oils. If the oil is too hot, the essential oils will just evaporate into the air.

Pour the muscle rub into metal tins, or the glass jar and let it cool to room temperature. You can also put the muscle rub in the fridge to speed up the process.

Do Not use on Broken skin

 

 

 

References and Pics

OA info and PRP

 

Mayo Clinic OA